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Save Your Tackle- Build a Quarantine Tub

Tackle Organization

It has been said that I am a bit particular in my ways, and I will not deny it. But there is always a reason! Much of what I do is to limit the effects of salt on our equipment, like rods and reels, the boat, etc. Often taken for granted is your tackle, which is not cheap either. If I expose tackle to the elements, then it can never be returned to the tackle box without being de-salted, dried and re-sharpened if appropriate. If you contaminate your tackle box with salt it will cause the rusting or corrosion of your entire tackle supply.

I build myself a “quarantine tub” where we stage tackle we may need during a trip and store any tackle that I have used until it is cleaned and dried.

Just squeeze your soap mitt during the boat cleaning over the tub and then let dry. Remove any steel hooks as they are going to rust either way.

How to build it

Get a small Tupperware type container that will fit neatly on your dash or console. Buy a better quality tub, as the cheap ones can shatter when you drill them. You will also need some suction cups from the hardware store.

Arrange the suction cups on the bottom so as to support the tub without wobbling.

Mark the suction cup placement with a sharpie.

Find a drill bit that fits the nub of the suction cup tightly. I use the lid for test drilling as I do not use it.

First drill a smaller pilot hole, followed by the larger bit. Spin the bit fast to help make a clean hole without shattering the tub

Now work the suction cups into the hole. You want it to be a tight fit.

Now drill some smaller drain holes so that the tub does not hold water.

Lastly put a bead of silicone around the top of the suction cup to help hold it in place.

Offshore Academy Quarantine Tub

This simple system will make your tackle dollars go further as well as catching more fish because you tackle is in better shape. Re-sharpen hooks, oil swivels and make sure all is dry before putting back in the tackle box.

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Capt. Scott Goodwin started fishing in the lakes of Kentucky where he grew up. A move to Florida, however, brought him into a whole new realm of fishing. After receiving a bachelor's degree in biology from Eckerd College, he decided that he liked catching fish more than studying them and thus began his career as a captain. Scott began working as a mate on a charter boat and worked his way up to captain. He has been fortunate to fish in some of the top locations on the globe, including Florida, Panama, Costa Rica, Mexico and the Bahamas. Scott has learned from some of the best captains in the sport and has more than 27 years experience as a professional fisherman. He openly shares his knowledge and fishing tips on BD. Scott is now the editor of BDOutdoors.