It’s October … What To Do? Just Keep Skipping, Just Keep Skipping

Hectic work schedules, flag football and the kiddos have kept me off the water since August. The calendar turned to October and I finally had a free day on Monday … so what should we do. Call Ali and JUST KEEP SKIPPING MAN!

Ali and I planned an overnight with the idea of heading out slowly Sunday night and fishing till dark on Monday. Mr. Halibut Phat Matt hopped on the Jihad as well to try and cross a big BFT off his bucket list.

Without any really solid Intel from the day before and neither us being out in the last couple of weeks we weren’t dead set on where to start.

We got some info that there may be some fish on the inside so rather than driving slow out to SCI at night we decided to leave at 4 AM and be on the inside stuff at gray.

PENN ReelWe got to that zone and were greeted with flat calm seas, 5 knots and winds and the sun shinning. Man it’s been a while since I’ve been offshore on such a perfect day! Gotta love Oct in SoCal.

We worked the area for a few hours. There was some life but no tuna on the meter or showing so we bagged that area quickly and started the long ride outside. We also got a buzz from a buddy that was out that way that had seen a few jumpers which helped make the decision easier.

On the way out we metered fish several times so it seems like there is still a huge spread of fish out there. We arrived at our numbers without anyone in the general vicinity. We got the kite up and I was concerned. Nothing on the meter on our first tack of 5 miles and then nothing for the next 3 miles on our second tact. Half way through the second tack Ali marks a school that stays on the screen for a solid 2 minutes while moving at 8 knots…i.e. tonnage.

2 minutes later I see a blow up, wind tight and were on! Always good to hook up by noon.

Tuna fightMatt jumped in the harness and started to pull on his first big tuna. The fish didn’t take a ton of line on the first run and I was thinking 80lber. I was wrong this fish turned out to be a DEMON. One of the ones that just doesn’t want to die. Matt pulled his ass off with 25#’s of drag on the fish but it just didn’t want to die. We had it at color in about 45 minutes and then spent the next 45 minutes trying to plane the fish up to stick it.

bluefin reportAbout an hour and half after we hooked up we had 3 gaffs in a really nice fish for Matt. This thing was so pissed even with three gaffs in it’s head it still wasn’t done and put a few holes in the kill bag.

I should also note we had that school up and blowing up around the boat for most of the time

We finished cleaning up and icing the fish around 3 and got the kite right back up. The next 1.5 hours was accompanied by nothing. No marks no fish up top. Ali and I were talking about running to another area we had marked fish on the way out when Matt screamed were bit from the cockpit the indicator came down but the fish didn’t stick. For the next 2 passes we stared at them on the meter in same spot over and over but they just wouldn’t bite.

kite fishingAli called it and said he guaranteed they’d bite again as the sun starting going down. Right on cue we got bit around 6:30. I got to pull on this one. We pushed the drag little higher and I was able to get another really nice fish in the boat in 25 minutes.

Out of light we took the long ride home and got back to the slip around 10:30.

Thank you again Ali for another great trip on the Jihad.

Stoked to see Matt’s smile after that fish, so much fun seeing someone get their first big tuna!

Remember. Just keep skipping just keep skipping.

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Brett Weinberg grew up in New York, New York, and started fishing from the docks and party boats of Brooklyn and Long Island at the age of four. At 10 he and his family moved from New York City to Cold Spring Harbor, which gave him immediate access to the ocean on a daily basis. Brett continued his passion and learned to fish the beaches on his own and also began fishing on local head boats. He made his first tuna trip at the age of 11, where he landed his first yellowfin. For the next 18 years Brett ran his own boats and continued to fish and work on boats in is his local area and in Montauk, New York. He has appeared on the cover of several magazines and was a featured expert at a Saltwater Sportsman Magazine seminar. In 2009 he was offered an opportunity to help start a pet food company named ROTATIONS Pet Food, based in California. Brett moved his family to San Clemente and has continued his fishing prowess on the West Coast. In three short years Brett has caught everything Southern California has to offer from swordfish at night and big mako's offshore to trophy sea bass and halibut on the inshore grounds.