Why don't we bridle our big baits and kite baits?

Discussion in 'San Diego Long Range fishing Reports' started by afraser, Oct 30, 2017.

  1. Fishybuzz

    Fishybuzz fishybuzz

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    Yep but the drag was the porpoise biting them off just behind the head....very frustrating at times....
     
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  2. Rodless_Jim

    Rodless_Jim I've posted enough I should edit this section

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    I don't know about bridling a skippy, but I use a trap rig. Makes it easier to get the big hook to stick. I've seen people yank the skippy out of the tuna's mouth, maybe even the belly more than once, because the hook stayed in the bait.

    I don't claim to be any kind of expert at it, but I prefer to use a trap.
     
  3. Rodless_Jim

    Rodless_Jim I've posted enough I should edit this section

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    And nothing more frustrating than a drive-by where the tuna hammers the bait and crushes it, but doesn't come back to eat it!
     
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  4. JohnTFT

    JohnTFT Insomniac

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    Im not so sure a bridled bait in the back will make the bait live any longer. The stress level is still there. You dont have the option of putting the bait in a tube and setting up your needles and floss to get it done. You jig the fish up and the deck hand holds it.

    You run and get your big bait set up. To bridle it will take two deck hands which may not be available depending on how busy fishing is.

    I think catching the bait on the jig and setting the hook early in the jig strike is key. Lessens the chance of a gut hook. Less damage to the fish is less stress.


    Slap a 12-14/0 Southern Tuna in its back and flip it out. They live long enough to get bit. The longer you fish them leads in my experience to some really big sharks!

    I have caught a few big ones on skipjack. The slap hook method on a LR boat seems to be about right for me.
     
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2017
  5. Tim Turis

    Tim Turis Well-Known "Member"

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    B96B4A82-96C3-4C77-B0FD-C9C1115E3C8F.jpeg

    Big ones around a ball of skipjack.
     
  6. DC61

    DC61 Well-Known "Member"

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    I do bridle mine. I put it through the base of the eye socket. Once I spin the bait and insert the hook through the line the hook rides in front of the eyes, above the nose. Turning the skipjack upside down and covering its eyes calms it down.

    I buy the mortician needles from Amazon and open the eye with a dremmel. I use waxed rigging floss. I premake the 5" loops and hang them on my needle. The entire process takes about 30 seconds. And yes, the bait definitely lives longer.
     
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  7. Fishybuzz

    Fishybuzz fishybuzz

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    Jim ho many fish have you caught with the trap hook set up?
     
  8. dh515

    dh515 I've posted enough I should edit this section

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    Here’s a short video that shows bridling a bait through the back.

     
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  9. Rodless_Jim

    Rodless_Jim I've posted enough I should edit this section

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    Three. None of them over 120lbs. I'm astonished they could swallow the bait, but they did. In each case they were smaller skippies, but even so it was surprising.
     
  10. JohnTFT

    JohnTFT Insomniac

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    These would work also.

    We use them shark fishing.

    Singleopen_Final1.jpg bb.jpg
     
  11. Cubeye

    Cubeye I've posted enough I should edit this section

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    Would you care to detail your trap rig? What size hooks? How do you rig it?
     
  12. Holi-e-Mackeral

    Holi-e-Mackeral Holi-e-Mackeral

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  13. FishRock

    FishRock I've posted enough I should edit this section

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    Have seen some recommending that you clip the upper and lower tips of the tail on big baits to slow them down a bit and make them an easier target for a YFT to get a hold of. Seems like this would make them an easier target for sharks as well. Also recommended that you use a stronger rubber band as a bridle rather than line to allow the hook to move into position with more freedom once the bait has been taken.
     
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  14. Rodless_Jim

    Rodless_Jim I've posted enough I should edit this section

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    Similar to Jeff's setup below Kub.

    I don't leave that 1" distance between the hooks, though. I use a 5/0 or 6/0 ringed Flyliner as my small hook, and I use 50lb spectra to tie the ring of the Flyliner to the bend of the Southern Tuna Hook. This ensures that the big J-hook stays in the correct "attitude" in relation to the bait up until it is time to (hopefully!) set the hook.
     
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  15. Rodless_Jim

    Rodless_Jim I've posted enough I should edit this section

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    I have wondered about that too. But perhaps it's just more time before getting the skippy back in the water? Usually not considered a good thing.
     
  16. Bill W

    Bill W tunaholic

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    A trick used to fish Grouper with a fly lined skippie, or large bait on the kite.
     
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  17. Cubeye

    Cubeye I've posted enough I should edit this section

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    Has anyone hooked a tuna after the skipjack has died? Or there's very little movement from the bait? They eat chunks, so why not a dead skipjack?
     
  18. Juanba

    Juanba CR

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    It seems that big baits get bit fast after getting in the water. Too long a soak and you will catch a shark. I have hooked many sharks soaking too long.

    Catch a bait fish a bait is what many like to do. I can see the brittle bering easier on the bait but most just change out a bait for a fresh one when it starts to die.
     
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