Whats line rating for rods

Derrick.Van

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Mar 26, 2019
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Los Angeles
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Derrick Van
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Don't got one
What does the line rating mean on rods? I'm asking because typically there is a mono rating and a braid rating and the braid rating is higher than mono so what is it saying? Possible dumb question but I am pretty dumb
 
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Dragon

It is what it is...
May 24, 2006
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Paul
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22' Pro Sport CC / 20' Skipjack Open
The rating on the rod gives you the pound test it is rated for. The rating on the reel give you the line capacity for mono and braid that will fit on the spool. Braid will always be more because is has a smaller dia. than mono...Seems your combining 2 different questions together. I personally think the rating on the rod is for mono as there was no braid back then. Everyone fishes braid for the extra strength (less break offs) less stretch (hook set) and more capacity. For when you hook a big BF. Im a mono guy mostly...I only have a couple of rods with braid. My BB rod w/2 speed & my heavy jig stick with a 2 speed...Hope that helps...GL
 
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Day0ne

I Should Upgrade My Account
Dec 24, 2004
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David
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233 Formula Shadowdancer
The two ratings seem to be some sort of marketing ploy, as they don't make sense. I usually go with the mono rating, if it seems to be true, but all line ratings are subject to validation.
 
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LR Houdini

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Jun 26, 2020
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Don Burnett
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In my opinion the line ratings they place on rods is a marking ploy…. For example is an 8 foot has a line rating listed as …
30#-80# … the first thing I’d do is ask the shop owner this question ? Will this rod fish 80# test line on say 100# tuna ?
Most likely with a good reel on the rod …you’re going to get your ass kicked ! And a 100# fish on 30# … I hope you don’t get depressed easily ! Because the odds are in the fishes favor…
A rod with a 30#-80# rating 🤔… go with a middle of the road line test for this rod… like say 40#-50#-60# … it’s a 50# test rod.
Different rod manufactures are all very similar … just consider what fish species your going to be targeting … this site is where you want to be asking questions. Just don’t be purchasing a rod because you think it’s pretty … you can most likely get by with three different rods when bluefin tuna fishing … but for myself…
I take six (6) +- rods on multi day trips… a lighter 30#-40# class outfit … a middle of the road 50#-60# outfit … and a 100#-130# class outfit for when the big boys decide to chew…
With six rods and a reel bag with extra reels I feel confident…

If your going to be fishing yellowtail on kelp patties get yourself a 9 foot jig stick and a reel designed to cast Tady 45’s and Starman jigs … just to start … jigs and jig fishing can become addicting 💉
 
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Dozer217

Almost A Member
Aug 12, 2010
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LBC
You should also test it out, bend it, put a real on it and bend it, any quality tackle shop will have you do this, that will show you what to expect from the setup you're thinking about.
 
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Wade K in deep

IFish4Sanity&SelectivelyHarvest
  • Sep 24, 2019
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    Wade Knupp
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    Kayak & Kickboat
    The Mono ratings are mostly a suggestion telling you that the center of the range is the sweet spot but the high and low values are kinda the limits of what will work reasonably well.
    The braid versus mono ratings are because a lot of people will fill the reel with braid and put a top shot of mono or fluorocarbon (commonly called a Kelp Cutter rig). The Mono strength will generally be what is suited to the rod. The Braid strength is what size will tie well to the mono by being close to the same diameter.
     
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    LR Houdini

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    Jun 26, 2020
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    Don Burnett
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    N/A
    Makes total sense guys…
    For the newer fisher men and women … it depends on where and what your going to be targeting as fish 🐠 🐟 🎣 species…
    Their is a huge difference between a 3/4 day boat ride and a 2-3-4 day per testing the bluefin tuna … or those longer 8-12 ++++
    day trips down into and off of Baja …
    Ask your repeatable local tackle dealers here in Southern California of which there are many …. They’ll let you pull on rods and talk about their reel preferences… but I’ve noticed at present many are out of the more preferred rods and reels…
    I’d keep tuned to Bloody Decks … save your money … and ask questions of the many perch jerkers here on BD’s …
    Maybe get/go on a few fishing trips and ask the crew and such.
    You can always rent tackle … that’s a starting place …
     
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    Omarkayak

    I've posted enough I should know better...
    Jul 26, 2007
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    Northridge, CA
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    Donald W. Clarke III
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    11+ ft, Ocean Kayak Scrambler, P 'N' Queue Pod
    When they give rating for both mono and braid, the mono rating is for topshot/leader strength. For most applications, leader is your weakest link. If it gives a range in mono rating, rod will generally function best toward middle of range (doesn't feel like a club; but powerful enough to pull that hard). Ignore braid rating (such as one might do for some posters, like me!).

    Good fishin'!
    BDC OK
     
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    JPeterson

    Almost A Member
    Mar 16, 2009
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    Bakersfield, Ca, USA
    Name
    Jeremy Peterson
    Boat
    22' Davis Cortez
    I’ve read most of the responses to this thread, but still haven’t seen a real answer to what rod ratings mean. So here we go…

    Every rod is designed to handle a certain amount of pressure or strain optimally, which is controlled by the amount of drag being supplied by your reel (any pressure applied that’s above the drag setting of the reel will cause the drag to slip, preventing that pressure from being transferred to the rod). And the drag on a reel is typically set at roughly 25% of the breaking strength of your line. That means with 40 pound line you should be able to safely run about 10 pounds of drag. Hence, if a rods sweet spot is with 10 pounds of drag on the reel, then by doing the math it means you should be fishing roughly 40 pound line. That’s how companies determine line ratings for rods.

    Most rods are designed to fish optimally in the middle of their line ratings (a rod rated #30-#80 will usually load best with ~#50 line, or 10-12 pounds of drag).
     
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