What is an ideal arsenal for upcoming 15 day trip

Discussion in 'San Diego Long Range fishing Reports' started by potuna, Nov 14, 2016.

  1. potuna

    potuna Unknown member

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    Pete
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    What would you guys that know bring on an up coming 15 day? How many and make up of yft rigs? Same for wahoo and what else?
    Thanks
     
  2. screamingreel

    screamingreel Long Range Fanatic

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    Jeff Burroughs
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    Pete, an "ideal arsenal" is difficult to define and very subjective. There are many variables, preferences and perspectives. I will give you one opinion. You can adjust it to your tastes...

    A couple of 100 & 130 lbs. bait and a couple of 50 lbs. wahoo jig rigs can get it done. Beyond these 6 basic rigs, you could add a 200 lbs. kite rig, 30 lbs. wahoo bait (& making bait) rig. I like to bring at least one long jig stick for surface iron and/or poppers. Maybe a 60/80 lbs. stealth bait rig just in case. ~ 10 rigs is about right depending on your approach. Everyone does it somewhat differently so it affects what you bring.

    Are you going on a trip soon?

    - Jeff
     
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  3. walkerman

    walkerman I've posted enough I should edit this section

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    Every rod/reel combo you have plus one.
     
  4. AKSalmon

    AKSalmon I've posted enough I should edit this section

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    Bill Brown
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    Sold my Parker. You can find me on the Red Rooster.
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    I fly from Alaska so I just can't bring as much tackle as everyone else on the boat. Here's what I bring:
    •• two 130# outfits (Accurate 50T and Avet EXW 30/3) on appropriate 7' rods
    •• two 100# outfits (Avet 30/2 and HXW Raptor) on appropriate 7' rods
    •• two 50# outfits for wahoo, one of a lighter rod for bait and one on a stiffer rod for jigs and bombs (Avet JX 6/3 Raptor and LX 6/3 Raptor)
    •• one outfit for making bait (Accurate BX2 600) that will double as a wahoo outfit if necessary.
    •• I borrow the boat's kite gear but troll one of my 100# outfits with my lucky Maurader.

    Tackle is tough too because of airline weight restrictions. I take as many leaders as I can make ahead of time (plus more 100# and 130# fluorocarbon on spools) and lots and lots of Owner Super Mutu ringed hooks sizes 4/0, 5/0, 6/0 and 7/0, plus a few 10/0 Owner Jobu hooks for big bait. I take only about a half dozen bombs and jigs for wahoo and as much weight as I can take and still keep my tackle box within limits.
     
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  5. potuna

    potuna Unknown member

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    Pete
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    I was on the let's talk hook up trip after thanksgiving until my shorthair blew her acl (ccl for dogs) out. She had the TPLO surgery two weeks ago and should be back to normal in January, they need lots of pt. I'll be on the Braid or las rocas trip on the star, need to confirm with Tracy and the boss. I'll post what I have already and see what you think.
     
  6. potuna

    potuna Unknown member

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    Pete
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    Mak 50W with 200 JB hollow on a cx70 invictus
    ATD 50 topless on a wahoodad 3x 7 3" no line yet
    SDS 3 speed on a 7 6" viper 130 hollow
    SDS 2 no line or mak 20 100 on a 2x4, could get another rod and have both
    HXW raptor 3 speed 100 on a 1x3
    HXW raptor 2 100 on a cp70xh
    This is what I've acquired over the last two years for this trip for yft. I'll check what I have for wahoo.
     
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  7. backlashjack

    backlashjack Scallywag

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    Jackson
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    bass rod - just in case
    1 -30# to 40# setup (probably won't get used)
    2 - 50# setups
    1 - 60# - 80# setup
    1 - 80# to 100# setup
    2 - 100# setups
    2 - 130# to 150# setups
    1 - 150# to 170# setup
    1 - 200# setup

    plenty of weights, hooks, bombs and raiders
     
  8. potuna

    potuna Unknown member

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    Upside is I live in San Diego and I'm 10 minutes from the landing. Wife drops me off and picks me up so I can bring anything.
     
  9. Shooter

    Shooter Member

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    Take what you have now then after your trip go shopping with all the new knowledge you picked up on the trip.
    Good news is that it's a never ending process.

    ENJOY!!!
     
  10. spinner

    spinner Well-Known "Member"

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    it also depends on the boat and your skill and experience level. use the boat rig for trolling. you can you the baot rig for the kite/buttttttttttttttttttttttttttt, be aware that they will not use a flourocarbon leader and you will be susceptable to leader failure/breakage/ so a must have would be a kite rig of your wn with flourocarbon leader. second most important is a go to sardine rig for flyline/scratch fishing. if i was only going to take 1 rig of my own it would be one of the new mak 30s/ you might even get 2 of them because that will be what you will use 75% of the time.
    then make sure you take an asortment of mustad hudlum hooks for flyline scratch sardine fishing/5/0 is always a save bet/makesure you get the wide bite version/not the narrow bite version/the later pull pretty easy. then after that its what ever you have and or use the boat rental gear/ they will also have all the terminal gear you need/just make sure you bring plenty of your
     
  11. tunachris

    tunachris Member

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    A bunch of Internationals
    Couple of long rods with Newells
    Some lighter stuff I rarely use
    More tackle than I will use over a lifetime
    Lots of flourocarbon
    Some big ass hooks
    A bunch of unnecessary stuff just because
     
  12. afraser

    afraser I've posted enough I should edit this section

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    aaron
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    I'd make sure to have 4 setups for big yft with one of them setup for skipjack as bait, meaning at least 700 yds of 100-130 line.2 rods for wahoo, one bait one bombs, and 1-2 rods for popping/surface iron. You need multiple yft rods bc sometimes you have sharks or small fish that tear up your leaders and you don't want to rerig in a bite, although we can probably all change a hook out and retie in under a minute, changing leaders is a bigger task. Maybe have a backup rod for any casting rod, in case of professional overruns in a hot bite. If you do pick out a birds nest, make sure to keep your fingers out or wrap the line around the rod so it the line breaks before pulling tight at the reel. Add a bait rod as well. I also bring a heavy jigging rod, and 2 more long rod so I don't have to switch lures.
     
  13. Steve K

    Steve K Hey, I'm gettin' bit...

    Location:
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    Hmm, some interesting opinions here. Really the easiest tackle list as there are only three species to target: Giant Yellowfin Tuna, Wahoo, and bait. Just as shit can go wrong in a hurry when Wahoo fishing, same thing can happen fishing those big tuna. Couple of 50's for 130 lb and then 150 lb if there are Salamis to use. I'll use a Cal treated Penn 50S on a Super Seeker 6463XXXXH and an Avet SDS50 on a Super Seeker 6463XXXH. With a borrowed ATD30T on a Calstar 770XXXH, I'm about set.

    Optional would be the ATD50W on the 6364XXXXH for the kite and big baits and one for stealthin' around middle of the day when or if it slows down to just a scratch, Penn 30S on a Seeker Black Steel 6463XXH.

    Throw in whatever it takes to be ready for the Wahoo, jigs, bombs and bait. Use one of those outfits for catching bait. I think I'll add a 30 lb outfit (Penn Fathom 15LD2) for trying to catch those Tubes and put it in low on the retrieve, hoping the Porpoise back off and give us a chance.
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2016
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  14. alan760

    alan760 Well-Known "Member"

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    Alan
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    1. 2 130 lb outfits bait
    2. 2 100 lb outfits bait
    3. 2 50 lb outfits, wahoo jigs
    4. 1 40 lb outfit for wahoo bait
    5. 1 40lb outfit surface iron
    6. 1 130 lb outfit troll
    7. 1 130 outfit PL68/Flatfall (optional rig)

    Tuna rods are mostly CS 775 or 770 series. Wahoo rods 700H and 700M. Also have a Seeker 6463XXXH that I can't leave at home and new this year a UC 7-6 Viper.
     
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  15. Rodless_Jim

    Rodless_Jim I've posted enough I should edit this section

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    Jim
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    Rather than trying to list rods and reels (you are already getting great advice on that), I urge you to consider the various ways in which you might decide to fish. You may find that, as long as you have the tackle to set up for each tactic, you don't need to bring too many outfits.

    ASIDE: I say this in the full awareness that I myself always bring more setups than I strictly need...indeed, too many. Even so, this is how I believe one should approach this question; it is how I start putting my equipment together for a trip.

    When you are fishing for cow tuna, chances are you will use some or all of these techniques/tactics/outfits:

    - 200lb Kite
    Pretty basic. Use your own kite rig or borrow one from the boat. You may/will use different baits, so either come prepared with the parts and tools to make your own, get help from other anglers, or borrow/buy from the boat. How you spool your kite reel (if you have one) is very much personal preference. I use a Makaira 50W SEa, spooled with 500 yards of 130lb Threadlock, topped with another 400 yards of 200lb TUFLine Guides Choice. Add a top shot and leader as the boat recommends.

    - 130-200lb Big Bait
    For me, this is limited to fishing skippies or small yellowfin as bait, but typically not with big mackerel, which are big but not that big. Some people use their kite rig in this capacity. That can work well, if you remember to switch the setup from "kite" to "skippy" as soon as you finish a kite rotation, then (of course) switch back to "kite" when your turn is coming up. Many ways to rig for big baits, long top shot, short top shot, most prefer to use big "Southern Tuna" J-hooks, crimped or tied. 11/0 Mustad 7691 is a very common choice. If I use a Southern Tuna hook (I also sometimes use a trap rig with a big circle hook), I prefer the 7698.

    - 130-150 Nighttime Sinker
    I never saw this technique on my first 3-4 cow trips; never even heard of it. Then one year, I guess four years ago now, there was a big shift in the bite when we went in March-April. The big tuna (with some rare exceptions) just wouldn't bite in the daytime. Most of the time they wouldn't even show up. As the sun sank, though, or often at about 4:00 am, they would show up, but deep. With heavy current, you'd need a 12-16oz sinker (or even heavier) to get down to the fish. There are various ideas and tips about how to set up this rig, as well as how to fish it. The basic approach I've learned is to drop deep right from the start, especially if (as is common) the sharks have found the boat. Go all the way to 300, 350, or even 400 feet. Get down as fast as you can. Quite often a tuna will hit your bait on the sink. Sometimes it's very subtle, other times it's like a freight train. Once you get as deep as you want to go, engage the reel and wind back up through the tuna quite slowly. Once you get your bait in the strike zone, you'll usually know: with the reel in gear and the line relatively tight as you come up, these bites are mostly of the freight train variety.

    - 130lb Chunk
    I am no chunk expert, but I do fish it. I've seen a lot of people be very successful with it, and many oldtimers will say things like "if you want a lunker, be a chunker." What I can say is that it takes lots of patience. It also catches big fish. How long a top shot? How long a leader? Swivel? No swivel? How big a hook (most everyone uses a big circle of some kind)? It's all personal preference.

    - 130lb Jig
    On these trips lots of big tuna are caught on jigs. PL-68s or JRI-8s (my preference) in glow colors account for many/most of them. This is like yo-yo'ing for yellowtail, but with heavy line and heavy jigs. With tuna reels, it is often hard to get the jig moving fast enough to draw attention. And even if you can, just a couple of retrieves can leave you winded. In this one instance, a reel recommendation: get a 50-sized reel with a 4.0:1 high gear, at least if you plan to do much jigging.

    FYI: If you are going to jig, you should make sure your Big Bait outfit is ready to go in an instant. It is very common to catch a skippy on your big glow jig! Be ready to switch and fish that big bait. On my last trip, we caught two super cows...both on skippies.

    - 130lb Flyline
    This is a tactic that some use more than others, and is more common on some trips than others. In recent years, at least on the trips I've fished, there has been very little call to flyline 130lbs in the daytime. The bite has just been too picky. That is not always the case, of course. Some really good anglers seem to be able to get bit on 130lb fluoro at times when the rest of us are really scratching to get bit on 100lb. Even so, it is far less common recently (in my experience) than it was when I first went chasing cows. You can use the same setup to fish sardines or mackerels (different hooks), but essentially the same technique.

    One time of day when this can really be a winning tactic, especially at Clarion, is in the early morning gloaming, starting about a half hour before dawn, and up to an hour or so after. Everyone will have likely been fishing big mackerel for 3-4 hours. If you slide out a lively sardine as the night begins to come to an end, you can tease a strike out of a lot of fish that have had lockjaw for a while. This has worked for me several times.

    - 100lb Flyline
    This has been the go-to setup for daytime fishing. Typically a sardine outfit. Nothing complicated here. If the fish are around, this works. In fact, this seems to be the best way to catch tuna during the day, even if they are smaller grade. But don't turn your nose up at catching 60lb fish when you can. It can help you dial yourself in, and even if you don't tag any (or many!), the boat almost always needs chunks.

    - 100lb Sinker
    Just as using a sinker rig at night has been very effective, a daytime sinker outfit can be deadly. The difference is, instead of a 16oz sinker and a deep drop, here you want to use anything from 3-6oz (depending on current) and fish your sardine at mid-depth. It gets your bait closer to the tuna, but hopefully not too deep. This has worked quite well for me personally, from early morning, throughout the day, on through sunset.

    OK, so how many setups do you need to fish using each of these techniques? Well, it depends on how many you want to try...I use them all. But in theory all you would need is one kite setup, one 130lb setup, and one 100lb setup. To switch tactics, all you need to do is re-rig. By the way, that isn't always such a chore. In many cases, it just means cutting off a hook and tying on a jig or a chunk leader.

    More realistically, I like to always have my skippy setup ready and waiting, because you never know when you'll get a chance to fish one. Plus, I prefer to keep my sinker rigs, both 130lb and 100lb, also ready and waiting, and I reserve my kite outfit solely for the kite. That's four setups. A versatile 130lb out fit, and a 100lb flyline outfit makes six. And based on my experience, that's all I would think I really need given the way I plan to fish tuna.

    That doesn't take into account wahoo, but if you want to keep a lid on the gear, one wahoo jig/bomb setup and one wahoo bait setup is enough.

    I call that the bare minimum, at least for me. Your mileage will almost certainly vary.

    Hope you find this helpful!
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2016
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  16. harddrive

    harddrive Wish I Was Fishing!

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    Min
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    Is this your first trip? If so, I would borrow from the boat.

    On the Indy, I believe they give you like three rigs for loaners. One 50 and one 30 and one wahoo rig.

    But... If you must have your own at a minimum, I would suggest these as a minimum.

    Kite. Use the boats. Only draw back is that the the boat's kite rig is used a lot and you don't know what kind of shape the spectra is in. The rig may have been in tangles and have some weak spots from rubbing, but mostly it will do fine. The Indy uses an Avet 50W.

    Troll. Use the boats. They will have their lures which are known to get bit on a 30 size reel. The wahoo doesn't make huge runs, so a 30 narrow is fine and the Indy uses an Avet 30.

    130 on a 50 size reel. Okuma Makaira 50, Avet SDS, Accurate ATD 50 works. This is for when the bite is not picky for sardines and can be used for skippies, salamis, tubes, chunk. Just change hooks and leader and it'll work.

    100 on a 30 size reel. Okuma Mak 20 or 30, Avet 30W, Accurate ATD 30 works. This is for when the bit is picky. This is mostly for deans.

    Wahoo. Any reel with high speed retrieve. I personally like a 2 speed like a Saltiga 40 2 speed lever drag or Avet HXJ 2 speed or Andros 12SIIa. The low speed is for just incase you hook the wrong model and need to bring that thing in.

    On the rods, I would pull on some and when you think it's too stiff, it will still bend into a U shape if you hook the right kind.

    Now if you are a tackle ho or wanna be a tackle ho, take a look at Rodless's list and that is what a tackle ho would take. ;)
     
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  17. Brad I

    Brad I Common Sense Isn't Common Enough

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    Assuming that you follow the (good) advice to bring multiple rigs of the same line weight, consider setting them up differently so that you are prepared for different conditions. For example, a short topshot for good weather conditions on one rig and a longer topshot on the other, or larger/smaller hooks, etc.
     
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  18. potuna

    potuna Unknown member

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    Pete
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    Here's what I have that I think is in the wahoo-stealthy category, thoughts?
    Stealthy Talica 20 and HX raptor 5-2
    Wahoo Talica 16 and 12, HX 5-2 and JX 6-3, Trinidad 40, 20a and 20, Torium 20hg, Newell P338
    I have the Trinidad 20a on a nine foot jig stick and appropriate 6.5 and 7' for all reels as well as a 8' tilefish,
     
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  19. Rodless_Jim

    Rodless_Jim I've posted enough I should edit this section

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    This is very much the pot calling the kettle black. Harddrive always brings at least as many setups and tackle as I do. After all, I learned from him!
     
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  20. Steve K

    Steve K Hey, I'm gettin' bit...

    Location:
    Bishop
    Name:
    Steve
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    18' Bayrunner, but I like the American Angler and the Red Rooster III
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    Pete, I really think one of the outfits you listed earlier is your go to for that midday lull period. Going too wimpy on the rod or short on line capacity on the reel is asking for trouble. That said, your HXW 3 speed Raptor on the 1 by 3 is light tackle in the Lower Zone.
     

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