Water Temprature

Discussion in 'Fishing Chit Chat' started by Cabrachupa, May 2, 2018.

  1. Cabrachupa

    Cabrachupa Iron & Wine

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    Was wondering if anyone can comment on why the water temperature off Los Angeles is 4 degrees cooler that it should be at this time of year?
     
    Last edited: May 4, 2018
  2. gunnyslinger

    gunnyslinger Well-Known "Member"

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    It’s at its normal temperature. Did you fish prior to 2014? Only 3 out of the last 21 years have been warm.
     
  3. Jason

    Jason I break stuff @ BD Admin

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    Circulation patterns within the Southern California Bight (SCB), the coastal ocean from Point Conception to just south of San Diego and inshore of the Santa Rosa Ridge, are more complex than elsewhere off the west coast of the United States. The equatorward California Current (CC), a well-described eastern boundary current, dominates flow in this region, and is strongest during summer.

    The CC branches shoreward and then poleward in the SCB, forming the Southern California Countercurrent (SCC), and, at times, an eddy-like cyclonic circulation (i.e. the Southern California Eddy) whose seasonal maximum is summer to early fall. The California Undercurrent, also strongest in summer, similarly exhibits poleward flow over the continental slope in this region.

    The strongest equatorward winds are found during spring along most of the California coast. At this time, the CC moves closer to shore and accelerates, producing mainly equatorward flow in the SCB. Thus, poleward flow in the SCB experiences a minimum during spring when the CC impinges on the Bight, and a maximum in summer when the CC moves further offshore and spreads out, allowing more water to shear from the CC, promoting the flow of the SCC.

    Winds in the SCB are generally weaker but highly variable as compared to the rest of the California coast. Related to this, upwelling events within the Bight tend to be limited to winter and early spring; local upwelling during summer, while strong elsewhere along the California coast, is minimal in the SCB due to a large reduction in wind stress. Temporally and spatially variable local winds, as well as eight nearshore islands and numerous coastal promontories, submarine canyons, basins, and ridges introduce complexity to these large-scale circulation patterns, particularly in the form of sub-mesoscale or small-scale eddies that are typically under 50 km in diameter.









































    website explaining it all
     
  4. ror_sal

    ror_sal "I'm too drunk to taste this chicken"

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    It’s been windy also. Which causes upwelling. Which pulls cold water from deep to the surface. But this is “normal” compared to 5-10 years ago.
     
    Last edited: May 3, 2018
  5. Cubanaso

    Cubanaso Pezcador

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    Upwelling is a very good thing.
     
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  6. Fisha

    Fisha skipper

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    Global warming :frehya2:
     
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  7. Paddyman1

    Paddyman1 I love pangas

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    This is complicated. Next question, please :smoking33:
     
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  8. stuman

    stuman Brawndo the thirst mutilator

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  9. Omarkayak

    Omarkayak Member

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  10. MarktheShark56

    MarktheShark56 Well-Known "Member"

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    Holy crap Jason! I read that whole thing and now I have a headache! :D
     
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  11. Fins in the Bin

    Fins in the Bin Well-Known "Member"

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    As a guy who has been surfing since the 70's, I don't know how you establish normal? I have surfed in water in the low 50's in San Diego and high 70's as a range, but to make a template that puts them into tighter boxes than that seems like I would need 2-3 more lifetimes. I remember times when the water warmed up real early and we shed our booties and full suits, and then you get a roll over and have to put them back on in June or July, I remember a few years ago Surfing the point in December in 68-70 degrees and we were cracking up about it. I alo remember about 6 summers ago when I never took a wetsuit off all summer and only went in my pool twice because winds out of the north never stopped all summer long. ( I didn't catch crap that whole summer for some reason)
     
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  12. SouthBayKiller

    SouthBayKiller I've posted enough I should edit this section

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    I was thinking it was about 4 degrees warmer than it usually is in April. Colder than the past few years yes, but I distinctly recall not too long ago cheering when the water was sustained above 60 for any period of time during March.
     
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  13. the SLIDER

    the SLIDER https://multimediabylj.com

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    Good on you.

    I want the "hooked on phonics" version
     
  14. Cabrachupa

    Cabrachupa Iron & Wine

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    Thank you. I guess I must have missed the last ten years. I remember fishing in the early 80s, at least a coupla times a week outa Redondo in April and the water would be full of chovies and bonita and off the palisades you would hit 20Lb Yellows if you could get down below the bonys.
     
  15. Cabrachupa

    Cabrachupa Iron & Wine

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  16. civicsurfer

    civicsurfer Member

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    At what temp do the yellows come out?
     
  17. Jason

    Jason I break stuff @ BD Admin

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    The yellowtail tuna never really leave. They stick around all year in to 55F. The offshore ones are babies that are born down south and move up with the 59-63F temps offshore.
     
  18. the_tunaman

    the_tunaman Well-Known "Member"

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    Yellowtail are in the jack family, not tuna FYI. Yellowtail range around all of the islands from Point Conception, at least, all the way down to the tip and back up into the Gulf.

    They have a substantial temperature range, down into the 50's and up through the 80's.

    Home guard yellows live at the islands year round, while schools of offshore 'tails can be found close and far up and down the same ranges that encompass the aforementioned islands.

    If you want a thrill, get on a boat targeting the brutes on the backside of Catalina amongst the spires... Bring your heaviest gear, and be ready for heartbreak when you try to get their head turned before they saw you off.
     
  19. Postal719

    Postal719 Well-Known "Member"

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    I thought it was yellowtail jackfin tuna?
     
  20. Richard J Gatewood

    Richard J Gatewood Newbie

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