Time for a YT regulation change?

Discussion in 'Fishing Chit Chat' started by the SLIDER, Jan 7, 2018.

  1. Hardcor

    Hardcor Hardcore

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    Throwing chunked Yellowtail at a Dorado patty is the way to get them going. Live Yellowtail in the tuna tubs is better then Bonitio and a live 8 inch Yellowtail on the thirty pound with a 4/0 is instant hook up on Dorado.

     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2018
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  2. fighingrjo

    fighingrjo paid my taxes

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    More regulations!
    Tell me more about how someone else should be able to tell me how to live my life.
    I like the idea of bringing up the subject, and i know many boats do have "self imposed" limits (which gets a big thumbs up, by the way), but more regulations is not the solution. we as a fishing community should self regulate better, and educate those who do not know, or put a spotlight on the habitual baby killers. I don't get out as often as i would like to, but with or without regulations, i wouldn't keep/target smaller fish (yt, tuna, or otherwise). i have kept small ones that got mangled by treble hooks and weren't going to survive any way, and enjoyed eating them. With regulations, the mortally wounded fish would have to be thrown back instead of kept. I know some operations/captains, etc that are more interested in "the numbers", and i won't fish with them again.
     
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  3. Hardcor

    Hardcor Hardcore

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  4. Yellowtail Dan

    Yellowtail Dan I've posted enough I should edit this section

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    These are fucking embarrassing!!!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 11, 2018
  5. SouthBayKiller

    SouthBayKiller I've posted enough I should edit this section

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    Wish I took a photo when we were making bait and got 5 x 4" yellows in one pull with the sabiki. Instant limit!
     
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  6. Paddyman1

    Paddyman1 I love pangas

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    Good point, LJ. A 10 # yellowtail is just shy of being able to make babies. I would be fine with a 5 fish daily limit, with only 2 that can be under 24".

    And all this time I thought you were one of the old-timers...sorry about that. :drunk
     
  7. Paddyman1

    Paddyman1 I love pangas

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    Lovie, Yellowtail A, or yellowtail B?

    IMG_1246.JPG LoretoYT_BD.jpg
     
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  8. mullet

    mullet Metal Fabricator

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    How about with regulations these undersize fish wouldn't be targeted.
    What a novel concept.
     
  9. Hardcor

    Hardcor Hardcore

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    I have been fishing Yellowtail and Tuna locally starting in 1964. Oceanside pier was the longest pier in the state. We caught Bonita and Yellowtail 8 months of the year and some were giants. We never had to go past the 14 or Avalon bank for Albacore or Bluefin. It used to piss us off when the Yellowtail took over, we would run from them for the Tuna. From 1964 until right now, don't let anybody tell you
    that we don't have to conserve. It is one tenth of what it was. I want to let all of you know one thing that is a fact. You and me, us recreational fisherman are not even in the equation. The commercial boats are wiping our fisheries out. The commercials boats take more in one night then we take in a whole season. That is a fact.

    PS The little ones don't breed. The big ones have hundreds of thousands of eggs
    Release a egg layer


     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2018
  10. wils

    wils lazy-ass well known "member"

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    This isn't an issue of "more regulations." Its an issue of modifying the ONE that we now have

    There is no commercial fishing for YT in California, Corey
    https://www.wildlife.ca.gov/fishing/commercial#310591027-finfish-and-invertebrates

    Other than that, we're good on what you have presented. :)
     
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  11. Yellowtail Dan

    Yellowtail Dan I've posted enough I should edit this section

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    I remember walking the pier with my Dad when i was a little turd and looking through the gaps in the boards and feeling it move with each swell. Your are 100% correct it has changed and not for the better.

    I’d only add that you won’t have breeders if folks keep killing the rats. One taco from one fillet isn’t worth it
     
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  12. crabdancer

    crabdancer Kook

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    The professors on here citing data and marine bio publications are selling the conversation short. The marine bio community is stuck in the academic industrial pressure to publish research. Sure, some of it is interesting, but who do you think they rely on for population sampling? They rely on experienced sport and commercial fishing operations. 99% of marine biologists couldn't consistently find fish if they tried.

    Here's a joke to make the point: I can prove there are no coyotes in LA County. How? I'd need a team of scientists and interns, we'd start our day at 9am with a one hour meeting, look for coyotes from 10-12, take an hour for lunch, look for coyotes from 1-3,
    and from 3-5 we'd meet to report our findings. We'd find Jimmy Hoffa before we found a coyote.

    Then we'd publish our findings, make a recommendation that coyote hunting be banned in certain areas, and ask coyote hunters which areas they can't live without so we know which areas to close.

    It's almost laughable except that's how the MLPA process went down.

    The point is that we should be very careful crying wolf over marine bio statistics when it comes to regulation.

    I'm all for responsibly harvesting yellowtail based on how much someone needs, but debating the point like it's an issue of population collapse and 'science' shows no understanding of the animal in question.
     
  13. Hardcor

    Hardcor Hardcore

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    The main damage was done in the 80's and 90's when the first purse seine fishing started here in Southern California. The sonars and fish finding computers were nothing like today's where we can tell what they are by the marks on the screen. The purse seine would wrap a sonar mark and if it wasn't what they wanted, they let it float. It was a practice back then. All us local guy's saw it that fished out of Dana Point. I know it's hard to believe unless you see it with your own eyes. The 70's and 80's I had a plant nursery Called Yoda's World in Dana Point and I fished 300 days a year. My boat was in the Barcardo and after I got things going I was in the water.
     
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  14. Hardcor

    Hardcor Hardcore

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  15. Willdoggy

    Willdoggy Willing Member

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  16. jer dog

    jer dog Fishing is life

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  17. Azarkon

    Azarkon I've posted enough I should edit this section

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    This is an assumption. There is no proof that yellowtail can spawn in California except during warm water years. And no proof that when they do spawn, the spawn stays in California. Local yellowtail - the home guards - are nearly always large fish. I don't think that's a coincidence. It's like BFT - many of those fish stay in our waters for years offshore, but there's no evidence that they spawn here and so no evidence that we can actually create a local population through stronger laws.

    Again, you're operating off of a complete assumption. Arguing for stronger laws on the basis of an assumption is what created the marine protection zones. You want to go through that again?
     
  18. Azarkon

    Azarkon I've posted enough I should edit this section

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    You seem to ignore the fact that 99% of the tuna we catch are also baby fish. Why the double standard? People need to get off the out dated belief that minimum size is a holy grail. Recent marine biology research has almost universally shown that selective targeting of large fish is terrible for a population. Should you want to practice conservation, you should actually release the large yellowtail as much as you release the small yellowtail.

    Population structure is much more important to maintain that count alone, since the year classes tend to have similar behavior so the chances of a stock being wiped out by a bad year class is much less when there is a diversity of year classes. This could easily happen when people selectively target large fish, since there is always less large fish in a stock. So say you selectively target large yellowtail and nearly wipe out the yellowtail > 28 inches in a year - what happens when the next year class fails to recruit? The whole stock collapses, that's what. By contrast, had you distributed pressure between large and small yellowtail, such that 50% of both survive, this will never happen.

    In short, the current belief is that when you harvest from all year classes equally, but avoid year classes in which the recruitment was poor, it's better for the fish, than when you target ONLY large fish or ONLY small fish.
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2018
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  19. Azarkon

    Azarkon I've posted enough I should edit this section

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    The regulations for yellowtail have stayed the same for decades without stock collapse, so no, I don't think this is a situation where sufficient caution hasn't already been shown, not to mention I believe recent conditions of the California current have been favoring yellowtail. Knowledge is the answer to fear, not locking yourself in a room. Want to improve the condition of yellowtail? Then both practically and as a matter of principle you should be supporting more research on the stock, not more poorly informed regulations.

    We don't need more laws based on fear, and we definitely don't want to set more of a precedent for laws based on fear. And the best way to counter environmentalist bias in academics, is to sponsor our own research. This is what the fishing associations should be doing, and in case we're that worried about it, then we should put money down.
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2018
  20. fishkilr

    fishkilr on the water

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    You still don't get it...
    Laws based on fear?
    My view has nothing to do with lawmaking or fear or anything else except that yellows are the ultimate gamefish in my opinion and strictly based on that I hate to see little dead ones that never had the opportunity to turn into what were all lookin for..
    I know it sounds crazy but there is no political statement behind my feelings at all..
    My opinion hasn't been formed from being locked in a room but rather being locked to a rail...
     

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