Thoughts about Fluorescent Paint to Highlight Iron and Troll Lures

TanstaaflSD

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Dec 3, 2013
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Tanstaafl
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I better get fishing as I am spending waaay too much time thinking about fishing.
As an experiment I bought some Testors Fluorescent paint (green, red, blue, yellow, etc.).
Anyone have any analysis or experience trying this.......
(1) adding fluorescent highlights to a trolling lure
(2) adding blue fluorescent paint to a the blue part of a classic Blue/White iron . . . . and so on. I will try the iron at the Coronado Islands in a week or so.

My reading suggests that fish "see" in UV as well as human color range. I am hoping to have my lures be more UV visible to the fish.......thoughts?

Details:
The belly yellow is fluorescent tape, the blue stripes are the paint on the troll lure.
The iron was an after-thought, but I kind of like the idea of differentiating my iron (and will be neater next few lures).

What do you think?

Tight lines !!

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kenstevens1

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Clear nail polish with glitter on surface iron would be interesting. A man told me about buying baldys jigs saying always looked for one with bubble. The bubble would sparkle in sunlight. Said they would all rush the new box looking for bubble. That would catch Moore fish.
 

rodblder

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I've put glow powder mixed in rod finish on the back side of lures like Salas and JRI for years, I always seem to get bit well, have used glitter on the front side also....
 

Chicago Pete

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I've put glow powder mixed in rod finish on the back side of lures like Salas and JRI for years, I always seem to get bit well, have used glitter on the front side also....
In the Chicago area / Lake Michigan, we do a lot of salmon fishing at night or low light conditions and use a lot of "glow in the dark" lures. I bought some green from this place, https://www.glowmates.com/, for a knock off flatfall a few years ago. I top coated the lure with clear acrylic to smooth out the finish.
 

nefarious235

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Pictured below is my personal favorite iron for multiple situations. I love to just dangle it as the bottom of a dropper Loop rig for white sea bass. I also drop it down $152 foot as I drift away from a paddy. FishdogGary now paints them for me and the color I call Psycho squid. By the way Gary I'm almost ready for another batch.
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Kingfisher13

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People get glow-in-the dark and UV mixed up.

UV is best in low light conditions up high in the water column-GITD is best when bait with Bioluminescsent properties is present-that could be Squid or even some baitfish.

I prefer to add gitd to my lures. Uv enhancement isn't as useful up here as it could be in the warmer clearer water down south. About half the uv light is gone by 40 feet and is under 5% by 100/150. I do more vertical jigging so having a jig emit light or reflect the available light has proven more useful. I use gitd and glitter paint in my repaints and flutter lures. Happy with the results.
 
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Sandydog

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As an experiment I bought some Testors Fluorescent paint (green, red, blue, yellow, etc.).

My reading suggests that fish "see" in UV as well as human color range. I am hoping to have my lures be more UV visible to the fish.......thoughts?
Fluorescent paint/tape doesn't give off UV light. It absorbs UV light, and converts it to visible light - the green, red, blue, yellow color of the tape you got. When you shine the blacklight on it, the blacklight is giving off UV light. The tape converts the UV you can't see into visible light. And because the light source is invisible to you (doesn't light up non-fluorescent objects), the fluorescent tape glows more brightly than normal colors. (Fluorescent light bulbs work this way - they give off mostly UV light, and rely on fluorescent phosphors to convert it into light visible to our eyes. A blacklight is just a fluorescent light bulb without these phosphors.)

At the surface of the water, it won't look much different to the fish than a regular colored lure. The fluorescent colors will be a little brighter due to the wavelength shift. Pretty much how it looks in the air.

In mid-depth waters (Wikipedia says down to 25 meters but doesn't cite a source, the University of Hawaii says to 50 meters), it will result in the tape "glowing" at the green, red, blue, yellow color more strongly than normal at that depth. So 20 meters down (about 65 feet), red and orange would normally appear black* since sunlight at those wavelengths doesn't penetrate that deep. But red or orange fluorescent tape will give off red or orange light, which if fish can see it will look unusual since it's normally not visible at that depth. Do note that if the fish is too far away, it will not see the red or orange anyway since the water will absorb it before it reaches the fish.

In deeper water your tape will appear black.* UV light doesn't penetrate deep enough to light up the tape.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Underwater_vision#Color_vision
https://manoa.hawaii.edu/exploringourfluidearth/sites/default/files/Fig9.7-LightPenetration.jpg

* It will appear black assuming there are no secondary colors to it which normally are hidden by the main color. Leaves in the fall don't turn red, yellow, and orange. Those colors were always there, you just couldn't see them because the green color of the leaf overwhelmed those second colors. In autumn, the cells containing chlorophyll which reflects green light die, making the secondary colors visible.

If you want a lure to reflect UV light, you'll need paint which reflects UV light. Aluminum paint will reflect UV. Chrome, silver, and gold not so much. "White" paint is a crap shoot, since there are lots of ways to make white.

https://www.laseroptik.de/en/coatings/metal-coatings

To really see what a fish might see, what you need is a camera modified to pick up UV light. (The camera sensor is already UV-sensitive, just most cameras have a filter which blocks UV and IR light to make the image conform to what our eyes see. Modification involves removing those filters.). Then you just need to attach a filter which mimicks the light color fall-off at different depths.

https://kolarivision.com/getting-started-uv-photography/
 
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TanstaaflSD

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Dec 3, 2013
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San Diego, CA, USA
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Tanstaafl
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Fluorescent paint/tape doesn't give off UV light. It absorbs UV light, and converts it to visible light - the green, red, blue, yellow color of the tape you got. When you shine the blacklight on it, the blacklight is giving off UV light. The tape converts the UV you can't see into visible light. And because the light source is invisible to you (doesn't light up non-fluorescent objects), the fluorescent tape glows more brightly than normal colors. (Fluorescent light bulbs work this way - they give off mostly UV light, and rely on fluorescent phosphors to convert it into light visible to our eyes. A blacklight is just a fluorescent light bulb without these phosphors.)

At the surface of the water, it won't look much different to the fish than a regular colored lure. The fluorescent colors will be a little brighter due to the wavelength shift. Pretty much how it looks in the air.

In mid-depth waters (Wikipedia says down to 25 meters but doesn't cite a source, the University of Hawaii says to 50 meters), it will result in the tape "glowing" at the green, red, blue, yellow color more strongly than normal at that depth. So 20 meters down (about 65 feet), red and orange would normally appear black* since sunlight at those wavelengths doesn't penetrate that deep. But red or orange fluorescent tape will give off red or orange light, which if fish can see it will look unusual since it's normally not visible at that depth. Do note that if the fish is too far away, it will not see the red or orange anyway since the water will absorb it before it reaches the fish.

In deeper water your tape will appear black.* UV light doesn't penetrate deep enough to light up the tape.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Underwater_vision#Color_vision
https://manoa.hawaii.edu/exploringourfluidearth/sites/default/files/Fig9.7-LightPenetration.jpg

* It will appear black assuming there are no secondary colors to it which normally are hidden by the main color. Leaves in the fall don't turn red, yellow, and orange. Those colors were always there, you just couldn't see them because the green color of the leaf overwhelmed those second colors. In autumn, the cells containing chlorophyll which reflects green light die, making the secondary colors visible.

If you want a lure to reflect UV light, you'll need paint which reflects UV light. Aluminum paint will reflect UV. Chrome, silver, and gold not so much. "White" paint is a crap shoot, since there are lots of ways to make white.

https://www.laseroptik.de/en/coatings/metal-coatings

To really see what a fish might see, what you need is a camera modified to pick up UV light. (The camera sensor is already UV-sensitive, just most cameras have a filter which blocks UV and IR light to make the image conform to what our eyes see. Modification involves removing those filters.). Then you just need to attach a filter which mimicks the light color fall-off at different depths.

https://kolarivision.com/getting-started-uv-photography/

Thanks!
Sounds like maybe more visible on YoYo & deeper (glow flat-falls) lures.....not so much on trolling, except maybe in low or no light.
Tight lines,