THE DONKEY GOES TO BOLA!

BadDonkey

www.baddonkey.com
Nov 2, 2009
353
181
San Quintin, Baja
www.baddonkey.com
Name
Rich Hollo
Boat Name
27' Skagit Orca XLC - BIG BadDonkey
It has been a long time since I posted one of my fishing reports but this year at Fred Hall show I actually had several people stop by and tell me that they would like me to start writing again. Well…. here you go.
I have been listening to tales of the great grouper fishing in Bahia De Los Angeles on the Sea of Cortes from my friends Capitan Juan Cook and Capitan Jaime Garcia of San Quintin for the last couple of years and have been scheming to go but my plans are always scuttled for one reason or another. This year we finally made it happen! I met Capitan Jaime’s partner, Ted “Butthook” Snellen at the Fred Hall show in Long Beach this March and we worked out a win-win trip which involved Capitan Jaime “El Jefe” Garcia and Butthook fishing with us on the Big BadDonkey. Capitan Jaime and Ted would share their wealth of knowledge and even give me a few hot spots to fish in exchange for the use of the Donkey for the trip. Capitan Jaime also brought his wife, Esmeralda, and I brought the Anchovy with me so it was a full boat, but we found a strategy that made it easy to fish 4 people comfortably by fishing one or two people from the bow or top of the boat while the other two fished the back. This strategy would rarely work in San Quintin due to the persistent swell and resulting rock and roll of the Donkey. In BOLA though, even with the winds kicking at 10 – 15 knots we were able to find shorelines along the islands that cut the wind enough to keep the swell minimized and allow for easy casting. According to Jaime and Ted the fishing was “OK” but it was pretty damn good by my standards!
IMG_5689.jpg

On day 1 we left home in Rialto, CA a little after 1:00pm on Saturday and made the 320 mile drive to San Quintin in a little over 7 hours. Note to self: NO TRAFFIC and we breezed through San Diego and Ensenada. We met up with Ted and Capitan Jaime at Jaime’s place in San Quintin and formulated a loose plan for the next day’s drive to BOLA and then went off to get some dinner and catch up with Capitan Hilo at Pedro’s Pangas. 6:00am came pretty dam early on Sunday but I had to get the Donkey loaded up and ready for the drive to BOLA. About 9:00 we drove down to buy new fishing licenses and hook up with Ted and Jaime. The plan was for me to tow the Donkey out front so I had a clear view of the road and Ted and Jaime followed up in a separate vehicle in case of the inevitable issue that would likely come up sometime during the trip. I had heard horror stories about the condition of the roads between San Quintin and BOLA which generally ended with “and then his whole dam axle ripped off” but to our surprise the road had been recently patched and the drive was relatively painless. We made the 220 mile trip in about 4.5 hours which is pretty impressive with an 11,000 boat in tow on a narrow, winding road. As we got close to BOLA it was obvious that there was some kind of offroad race going on which turned out to be the NORRA race. Just prior to getting to the town we pulled off the road to get a magnificent picture of the Donkey perched on a hill overlooking BOLA and this short detour almost became the undoing of our trip. As we were smiling and taking pictures, at least 10 offroad racers went screaming by us headed for town; and gas.
IMG_0217.JPG

Ted said we had better get into town and get gas immediately as there were only 2 stations and they would likely run out of gas quickly with the demand of the thirsty racers. We pulled up to the pumps behind 4 other cars and waited our turn as the line down the road grew into a choked cluster. It was obvious that the tanks must already be getting low because it was taking over 15 minutes per vehicle to fill up. When it was the Donkey’s turn, it took an excruciating 90 minutes to get about 130 gallons in the tank and then I just didn’t have the patience or heart to keep everyone else waiting. Every couple of minutes one of the racers would come to look at the pump to see how much fuel we were grabbing and the air became thick with tension. Finally, a woman approached and asked if we were going to take all the gas. She said “didn’t you know that we have the NORRA race this weekend?” to which I blurted out the first thing that came to my mind: “Didn’t you know I was going fishing this weekend?” She wasn’t particularly impressed, but a few of the other racers got a good laugh and they started talking to us about the boat and the fishing and the tension eased. We had enough fuel in the Donkey for at least 2 days of fishing and the attendant informed us that there would be a petrol truck coming the next day so we gave up the pump and headed to the hotel. Of course, the NORRA race was in town so there were no rooms but fortunately I love sleeping on my Donkey and Ted and Jaime have a small place to stay in BOLA so it all worked out in the end.
On day 1 of fishing I was mostly an observer; watching Jaime and Ted and driving the boat to glean whatever knowledge I could about fishing grouper in BOLA. Our first stop was bait and Ted began to earn his nickname. While Esmeralda and Anchovy pulled up 2 or 3 mouth hooked baits at a time and Jaime dumped them in the tank, Ted seemed to have an unusual knack to lasso the bait by the tail or yank it up from the depths by the bung hole. I can’t swear to it, but I believe Ted’s baits were the ones that hid in the corners of the bait tank ashamed to swim freely and expose their tender butts to more abuse. All of the sardines Ted caught simply died from shock; fortunately, the fish seemed to be more interested in artificial baits so it was not an issue. After putting a couple dozen choice and violated baits in the tank we headed out for one of the many islands just offshore from the boat ramp. The fishing was surprisingly similar to bass fishing in fresh water; working the shoreline casting to structure with stick baits. Jaime and Ted caught a few smaller fish along the edge of the first island but nothing of significant mass. Oddly, Ted seemed to catch about every 3rd fish by the bung hole; this was more than just coincidence! Coming off the island we stopped to fish a deeper shelf in about 160 feet of water. I got a chance to do some fishing and dropped down with a 9 ounce BadDonkey flutter jig and began working it. I tried using a fast yo-yo retrieve and drop for yellowtail but no takers. Then I let the jig hit the bottom and reeled up 5 or 6 cranks and let it drop like we do for ling cod in San Quintin but still no takers. On one of my drops I got a bird’s nest in the line and had to let the jig set on the bottom while I worked out the mess. As I reeled the line up and lifted the jig off the bottom, THUMP! I reeled up a chunky Sheep Heat; one of my favorite eating fish! I dropped the jig to the bottom and let it sit there a few seconds and then just hopped it up with the rod tip and let it settle. When I started reeling again, WHAM! Another chunky Sheep Head! I was onto something! We caught 2 more Sheep Head and some small grouper and sand bass and then headed off for another distant island to the south.
IMG_6422.jpg

The back side of the island was relatively uneventful but when we turned the corner and began to work the front side, El Jefe lit the torch. One and then two big Leopard Grouper came to the gaff and then Jaime landed the biggest fish of the trip; a 15 pounder. Ted picked up a few fish as well and Esmeralda did her part with a few nice keepers. Toward the end of the afternoon Capitan Jaime took the controls so I could try my luck. Being stubborn as I am I wanted to throw swimbaits to see if I could catch grouper on my lures. Something definitely liked the swimbaits but it wasn’t the grouper; Cochito! (Trigger Fish). Those little bastards would take neat little semi- circle chunks out of my swimbaits and render them useless in seconds. I burned through half a dozen swimbaits before throwing in the towel and switching over to a Rapalas. I caught a couple of nice grouper on the stick baits and by the end of the day but was a bit disappointed that I was not able to catch them on my lures. Regardless, at the end of the day we literally had a wheelbarrow full of fish!
IMG_6410.JPG

IMG_6414.jpg

On day 2 we decided to head north. We tried a deep water reef in about 260 feet of water for yellowtail but the current was howling and we were having a hard time hitting bottom even with 9 ounce jigs and when we did make contact, the jigs were quickly hung and lost in the rocks. UUGGHHH! We headed to Isla La Guarda and started working the front side. Today Capitan Jaime was driving the boat so I could cast and I decided to give the swimbaits another try. I tied on one of my new 4 ounce Mulita heads (R&D time!) in a green mackerel pattern and began casting towards the shore. This weight seemed to work perfectly as the lures ran deep enough to bump along the tops of the boulders As we got to the northern tip of the island, the action heated up. I began reeling in the lure as soon as it hit the water and used a medium fast retrieve and this seemed to defeat the Cochitos but the grouper were all over it! At first I was missing a lot of strikes but then El Jefe told me to just reel through the bite and not to try to set the hook: GREAT advice and I found that the grouper would often hit the lure 2, 3, 4, times before getting a solid hook up. This makes me think about fishing for seabass in San Quintin with swimbaits and how they hit the lures; Capitan Jaime is like the Fish Yoda! Ted was throwing a stick bait and I was kicking his ass with swimbaits but then again how many fish really want to get hooked in the bung hole? I caught 5 grouper in 5 casts and my day was made. We found the backside of the island to be pretty barren but at the end of the day we had another full wheelbarrow of fish. Not bad for “mediocre”!
IMG_6382.JPG

IMG_6394.JPG

On day 3 the wind was howling and we decided to head south again. Bait was hard to come by but we were doing very well on the swimbaits and BadDonkey jigs so it wasn’t a big concern. We fished one of the close islands and when we got to the northern tip I started to connect. I had used up all of my 5” green mackerel swimbaits the day before and switched over to one of my favorite specialty colors: bleeding trout. This seemed to be the hot ticket and I was catching fish like a pro! I got my trip best; about a 10 pound Leopard Grouper and then I caught a roving yellowtail that came streaking along the surface like a Maki to inhale my lure; WAY COOL! We rounded the island and, again, the backside was pretty much barren aside from smaller fish. We hit Sheep Head Reef again and pulled up 6 of the tasty critters this time and then we began to head further south but the wind took on a nasty grind and we decided to play it safe. We headed for the shoreline and worked our way back towards the boat ramp. Lots of smaller grouper and sand bass but nothing substantial; fun all the same. Our last stop was a deep water reef in about 270 feet of water. We made a couple of drifts with live bait to no avail and then Capitan Jaime directed me to try one of my BadDonkey jigs and on the next drift I hooked something but farmed it. Then I hooked and lost another one! And then ANOTHER!! SLUTBITCHWHORE!!!!! We made another drift and this time I hooked the fish and reeled it quickly to the surface. Hauchinango! (Red Snapper). We made a few more drifts and picked up a few more snappers and some big sand bass and then called it a day. Once again, at the end of the day I was surprised by the number of fish we pulled out of the bag. If this was a “mediocre” trip, I wouldn’t have enough cooler space for a good trip.
FullSizeRender.jpg

We were packed and stacked but there was one problem: I only had 1 – 2 gallons of diesel gas in my F350 and the local stations were dry. El Jefe worked his magic and took a couple of 60 liter jugs out to the main highway and scrounged up enough diesel fuel to get the Donkey back to San Quintin. I just cannot say enough about Capitan Jaime and his fish catching and innovative abilities. We had an easy trip back to San Quintin and an uneventful trip home. Since it was just me and Anchovy we were able to use the Sentri lane to cross back into the US: 30 minutes versus 2 hours and it probably would have been less if we had chosen the right lane. What an AMAZING trip!
Just some additional observations: BOLA is definitely an AMAZING place; it is no wonder they call it “enchanted”. There are multiple islands and the wind is unpredictable and highly variable. We saw parts of the ocean that were lake calm bracketed by well-defined channels of wind whipped whitecaps. One minute you are casting to boulders on the shoreline and looking at colorful fish under the boat and a few hundred feet away the depth finder loses the bottom. There is an amazing variety of fish and the islands and birds are beautiful. Definitely a bucket list destination!
If you’d like to get a hold of Capitan Jaime or Capitan Juan to set up a trip, here is their info:
Capitan Jaime Garcia: 011 521 616 101 9056
Capitan Juan Cook: 011 521 616 109 6877
IMG_6443.JPG
 
Upvote 0

jsl

Member
Oct 8, 2005
890
235
Ontario
Name
Scott
Boat Name
none
It has been a long time since I posted one of my fishing reports but this year at Fred Hall show I actually had several people stop by and tell me that they would like me to start writing again. Well…. here you go.
I have been listening to tales of the great grouper fishing in Bahia De Los Angeles on the Sea of Cortes from my friends Capitan Juan Cook and Capitan Jaime Garcia of San Quintin for the last couple of years and have been scheming to go but my plans are always scuttled for one reason or another. This year we finally made it happen! I met Capitan Jaime’s partner, Ted “Butthook” Snellen at the Fred Hall show in Long Beach this March and we worked out a win-win trip which involved Capitan Jaime “El Jefe” Garcia and Butthook fishing with us on the Big BadDonkey. Capitan Jaime and Ted would share their wealth of knowledge and even give me a few hot spots to fish in exchange for the use of the Donkey for the trip. Capitan Jaime also brought his wife, Esmeralda, and I brought the Anchovy with me so it was a full boat, but we found a strategy that made it easy to fish 4 people comfortably by fishing one or two people from the bow or top of the boat while the other two fished the back. This strategy would rarely work in San Quintin due to the persistent swell and resulting rock and roll of the Donkey. In BOLA though, even with the winds kicking at 10 – 15 knots we were able to find shorelines along the islands that cut the wind enough to keep the swell minimized and allow for easy casting. According to Jaime and Ted the fishing was “OK” but it was pretty damn good by my standards!
View attachment 922948
On day 1 we left home in Rialto, CA a little after 1:00pm on Saturday and made the 320 mile drive to San Quintin in a little over 7 hours. Note to self: NO TRAFFIC and we breezed through San Diego and Ensenada. We met up with Ted and Capitan Jaime at Jaime’s place in San Quintin and formulated a loose plan for the next day’s drive to BOLA and then went off to get some dinner and catch up with Capitan Hilo at Pedro’s Pangas. 6:00am came pretty dam early on Sunday but I had to get the Donkey loaded up and ready for the drive to BOLA. About 9:00 we drove down to buy new fishing licenses and hook up with Ted and Jaime. The plan was for me to tow the Donkey out front so I had a clear view of the road and Ted and Jaime followed up in a separate vehicle in case of the inevitable issue that would likely come up sometime during the trip. I had heard horror stories about the condition of the roads between San Quintin and BOLA which generally ended with “and then his whole dam axle ripped off” but to our surprise the road had been recently patched and the drive was relatively painless. We made the 220 mile trip in about 4.5 hours which is pretty impressive with an 11,000 boat in tow on a narrow, winding road. As we got close to BOLA it was obvious that there was some kind of offroad race going on which turned out to be the NORRA race. Just prior to getting to the town we pulled off the road to get a magnificent picture of the Donkey perched on a hill overlooking BOLA and this short detour almost became the undoing of our trip. As we were smiling and taking pictures, at least 10 offroad racers went screaming by us headed for town; and gas.
View attachment 922954
Ted said we had better get into town and get gas immediately as there were only 2 stations and they would likely run out of gas quickly with the demand of the thirsty racers. We pulled up to the pumps behind 4 other cars and waited our turn as the line down the road grew into a choked cluster. It was obvious that the tanks must already be getting low because it was taking over 15 minutes per vehicle to fill up. When it was the Donkey’s turn, it took an excruciating 90 minutes to get about 130 gallons in the tank and then I just didn’t have the patience or heart to keep everyone else waiting. Every couple of minutes one of the racers would come to look at the pump to see how much fuel we were grabbing and the air became thick with tension. Finally, a woman approached and asked if we were going to take all the gas. She said “didn’t you know that we have the NORRA race this weekend?” to which I blurted out the first thing that came to my mind: “Didn’t you know I was going fishing this weekend?” She wasn’t particularly impressed, but a few of the other racers got a good laugh and they started talking to us about the boat and the fishing and the tension eased. We had enough fuel in the Donkey for at least 2 days of fishing and the attendant informed us that there would be a petrol truck coming the next day so we gave up the pump and headed to the hotel. Of course, the NORRA race was in town so there were no rooms but fortunately I love sleeping on my Donkey and Ted and Jaime have a small place to stay in BOLA so it all worked out in the end.
On day 1 of fishing I was mostly an observer; watching Jaime and Ted and driving the boat to glean whatever knowledge I could about fishing grouper in BOLA. Our first stop was bait and Ted began to earn his nickname. While Esmeralda and Anchovy pulled up 2 or 3 mouth hooked baits at a time and Jaime dumped them in the tank, Ted seemed to have an unusual knack to lasso the bait by the tail or yank it up from the depths by the bung hole. I can’t swear to it, but I believe Ted’s baits were the ones that hid in the corners of the bait tank ashamed to swim freely and expose their tender butts to more abuse. All of the sardines Ted caught simply died from shock; fortunately, the fish seemed to be more interested in artificial baits so it was not an issue. After putting a couple dozen choice and violated baits in the tank we headed out for one of the many islands just offshore from the boat ramp. The fishing was surprisingly similar to bass fishing in fresh water; working the shoreline casting to structure with stick baits. Jaime and Ted caught a few smaller fish along the edge of the first island but nothing of significant mass. Oddly, Ted seemed to catch about every 3rd fish by the bung hole; this was more than just coincidence! Coming off the island we stopped to fish a deeper shelf in about 160 feet of water. I got a chance to do some fishing and dropped down with a 9 ounce BadDonkey flutter jig and began working it. I tried using a fast yo-yo retrieve and drop for yellowtail but no takers. Then I let the jig hit the bottom and reeled up 5 or 6 cranks and let it drop like we do for ling cod in San Quintin but still no takers. On one of my drops I got a bird’s nest in the line and had to let the jig set on the bottom while I worked out the mess. As I reeled the line up and lifted the jig off the bottom, THUMP! I reeled up a chunky Sheep Heat; one of my favorite eating fish! I dropped the jig to the bottom and let it sit there a few seconds and then just hopped it up with the rod tip and let it settle. When I started reeling again, WHAM! Another chunky Sheep Head! I was onto something! We caught 2 more Sheep Head and some small grouper and sand bass and then headed off for another distant island to the south.
View attachment 922959
The back side of the island was relatively uneventful but when we turned the corner and began to work the front side, El Jefe lit the torch. One and then two big Leopard Grouper came to the gaff and then Jaime landed the biggest fish of the trip; a 15 pounder. Ted picked up a few fish as well and Esmeralda did her part with a few nice keepers. Toward the end of the afternoon Capitan Jaime took the controls so I could try my luck. Being stubborn as I am I wanted to throw swimbaits to see if I could catch grouper on my lures. Something definitely liked the swimbaits but it wasn’t the grouper; Cochito! (Trigger Fish). Those little bastards would take neat little semi- circle chunks out of my swimbaits and render them useless in seconds. I burned through half a dozen swimbaits before throwing in the towel and switching over to a Rapalas. I caught a couple of nice grouper on the stick baits and by the end of the day but was a bit disappointed that I was not able to catch them on my lures. Regardless, at the end of the day we literally had a wheelbarrow full of fish!
View attachment 922957
View attachment 922958
On day 2 we decided to head north. We tried a deep water reef in about 260 feet of water for yellowtail but the current was howling and we were having a hard time hitting bottom even with 9 ounce jigs and when we did make contact, the jigs were quickly hung and lost in the rocks. UUGGHHH! We headed to Isla La Guarda and started working the front side. Today Capitan Jaime was driving the boat so I could cast and I decided to give the swimbaits another try. I tied on one of my new 4 ounce Mulita heads (R&D time!) in a green mackerel pattern and began casting towards the shore. This weight seemed to work perfectly as the lures ran deep enough to bump along the tops of the boulders As we got to the northern tip of the island, the action heated up. I began reeling in the lure as soon as it hit the water and used a medium fast retrieve and this seemed to defeat the Cochitos but the grouper were all over it! At first I was missing a lot of strikes but then El Jefe told me to just reel through the bite and not to try to set the hook: GREAT advice and I found that the grouper would often hit the lure 2, 3, 4, times before getting a solid hook up. This makes me think about fishing for seabass in San Quintin with swimbaits and how they hit the lures; Capitan Jaime is like the Fish Yoda! Ted was throwing a stick bait and I was kicking his ass with swimbaits but then again how many fish really want to get hooked in the bung hole? I caught 5 grouper in 5 casts and my day was made. We found the backside of the island to be pretty barren but at the end of the day we had another full wheelbarrow of fish. Not bad for “mediocre”!
View attachment 922955
View attachment 922956
On day 3 the wind was howling and we decided to head south again. Bait was hard to come by but we were doing very well on the swimbaits and BadDonkey jigs so it wasn’t a big concern. We fished one of the close islands and when we got to the northern tip I started to connect. I had used up all of my 5” green mackerel swimbaits the day before and switched over to one of my favorite specialty colors: bleeding trout. This seemed to be the hot ticket and I was catching fish like a pro! I got my trip best; about a 10 pound Leopard Grouper and then I caught a roving yellowtail that came streaking along the surface like a Maki to inhale my lure; WAY COOL! We rounded the island and, again, the backside was pretty much barren aside from smaller fish. We hit Sheep Head Reef again and pulled up 6 of the tasty critters this time and then we began to head further south but the wind took on a nasty grind and we decided to play it safe. We headed for the shoreline and worked our way back towards the boat ramp. Lots of smaller grouper and sand bass but nothing substantial; fun all the same. Our last stop was a deep water reef in about 270 feet of water. We made a couple of drifts with live bait to no avail and then Capitan Jaime directed me to try one of my BadDonkey jigs and on the next drift I hooked something but farmed it. Then I hooked and lost another one! And then ANOTHER!! SLUTBITCHWHORE!!!!! We made another drift and this time I hooked the fish and reeled it quickly to the surface. Hauchinango! (Red Snapper). We made a few more drifts and picked up a few more snappers and some big sand bass and then called it a day. Once again, at the end of the day I was surprised by the number of fish we pulled out of the bag. If this was a “mediocre” trip, I wouldn’t have enough cooler space for a good trip.
View attachment 922953
We were packed and stacked but there was one problem: I only had 1 – 2 gallons of diesel gas in my F350 and the local stations were dry. El Jefe worked his magic and took a couple of 60 liter jugs out to the main highway and scrounged up enough diesel fuel to get the Donkey back to San Quintin. I just cannot say enough about Capitan Jaime and his fish catching and innovative abilities. We had an easy trip back to San Quintin and an uneventful trip home. Since it was just me and Anchovy we were able to use the Sentri lane to cross back into the US: 30 minutes versus 2 hours and it probably would have been less if we had chosen the right lane. What an AMAZING trip!
Just some additional observations: BOLA is definitely an AMAZING place; it is no wonder they call it “enchanted”. There are multiple islands and the wind is unpredictable and highly variable. We saw parts of the ocean that were lake calm bracketed by well-defined channels of wind whipped whitecaps. One minute you are casting to boulders on the shoreline and looking at colorful fish under the boat and a few hundred feet away the depth finder loses the bottom. There is an amazing variety of fish and the islands and birds are beautiful. Definitely a bucket list destination!
If you’d like to get a hold of Capitan Jaime or Capitan Juan to set up a trip, here is their info:
Capitan Jaime Garcia: 011 521 616 101 9056
Capitan Juan Cook: 011 521 616 109 6877
View attachment 922960
Thanks for the bitchen report

Scott
 
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dweir

One of the Zooboys
Dec 2, 2011
252
462
Singing Hills (El Cajon), CA
Name
Don Weir
Boat Name
15' & 20' Bayrunners 'Zoo Boys'
Mahalo plenty (many thanks) for the report Rich.
I have some of your jigs as well as some mulitas that we are going to try this early June.

One of these days we will be on the water at the same time.
aloha
 
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twinfinpig

On the water
Jul 27, 2007
294
61
Oceanside, Ca
Name
Nick
Boat Name
19' Guardian
Epic Trip! Thanks for sharing. Did something similar 5 years ago on my Whaler. Was one of the coolest adventures ever. How did you get through Sentri towing a boat. I thought you were not able to tow anything in that lane? Did the rules change?
 
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BadDonkey

www.baddonkey.com
Nov 2, 2009
353
181
San Quintin, Baja
www.baddonkey.com
Name
Rich Hollo
Boat Name
27' Skagit Orca XLC - BIG BadDonkey
Mahalo plenty (many thanks) for the report Rich.
I have some of your jigs as well as some mulitas that we are going to try this early June.

One of these days we will be on the water at the same time.
aloha
Hi, Dr. Weir! I was just telling Anchovy the other day that we hadn’t gotten an order from you this year. Good to hear from you and good luck on your trip. If you’re going to use the swimbaits fish them fast!
 
Upvote 0

dweir

One of the Zooboys
Dec 2, 2011
252
462
Singing Hills (El Cajon), CA
Name
Don Weir
Boat Name
15' & 20' Bayrunners 'Zoo Boys'
Rich,
I intend to get the swimbaits in the water this year.
I have had great success with your flatfalls, so much so that I need several of them repainted.
My first drop with the green flatfall at the Bajo I hadn't put the pole in my rod belt as I dropped and before it hit the bottom the jig was bit hard by a big yt. Needless to say by the time I got my act together so too did the yt; He said 'adios'. Once I got it together it had the other Zooboys trying them since big yt were hitting them there and at Machos.

I called on the of the Zooboys this morning and he commented on the wheelbarrow full of fish!! Great catch!!
We will be down at the house from June 2 through the 12th.
CH 68 if you are around,'Zooboys'

aloha to you and the Anchovy
 
Upvote 0

BadDonkey

www.baddonkey.com
Nov 2, 2009
353
181
San Quintin, Baja
www.baddonkey.com
Name
Rich Hollo
Boat Name
27' Skagit Orca XLC - BIG BadDonkey
Rich,
I intend to get the swimbaits in the water this year.
I have had great success with your flatfalls, so much so that I need several of them repainted.
My first drop with the green flatfall at the Bajo I hadn't put the pole in my rod belt as I dropped and before it hit the bottom the jig was bit hard by a big yt. Needless to say by the time I got my act together so too did the yt; He said 'adios'. Once I got it together it had the other Zooboys trying them since big yt were hitting them there and at Machos.

I called on the of the Zooboys this morning and he commented on the wheelbarrow full of fish!! Great catch!!
We will be down at the house from June 2 through the 12th.
CH 68 if you are around,'Zooboys'

aloha to you and the Anchovy

Excellent! I’m planning on going back the first week in June. Just me and the Anchovy this time I believe. Hope to see you there.

PS - they definitely like the green Mack flutter jigs!
 
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cutcamp

Nueve Dedos
Aug 10, 2007
90
144
la mesa ca
Name
Eric Dahlkamp
Boat Name
215 Triumph "Nail Em Again"
Great report. I really appreciate your reports, especially the ones from San Quentin
 
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