Offshore Swing and a miss deep drop.... and some weird shit happened need explanation

PENN

Brett Wells

Almost A Member
May 3, 2015
147
282
23
Los Alamitos
Name
Brett
Boat
NA
My boat partner took the boat out today deep dropping. Off of catalina no love but a nice day on the water. He sends me this video and he’s all sketched out. While drift he heard a sizzling sound and follows what he heard to the rods, they are conducting some electricity and sizzling, shocking to the touch. The antenna is doing it as well on the tower. He turns off the battery switch and it continues to do it. Coming and going over the next few hours without any battery power on. Any explanations? navy? Or aliens lol? Weather? Easy explanation would be the boat but it still did it with the power off, and all other areas of the boat we not conducting except rods and antenna

Watch video sound up
 
Last edited:
Upvote 0

John56434

Idk what to name dis
Aug 1, 2019
257
155
West side
Name
John
Boat
Fishing boat
The Sash-Ringing, the Trash-Singing, Mash-Flinging, The Flash-Springing, Ringing, The Cr-Crash-Dinging, The hash slinging slasher!!!!!!!
 

nicodemus

Fish, he said softly, aloud. I’ll stay with you...
Apr 10, 2012
654
906
The 505
Name
Nick B
Boat
African Queen
Not lightening, one of the rods had an electric eel hooked up!
 
  • Like
Reactions: C-4 Fishing

One_Leg

Ret. Comm. Diver Medic
May 11, 2007
5,657
2,180
You're mined!
www.csicop.org
Name
Alan
Boat
1967 Cobia Cuddy Cabin/Evinrude Looper
HAARP












APRIL FOOLS !!!
 
  • Like
Reactions: SMYLEE
Upvote 0

Mike_I

I Should Upgrade My Account
May 19, 2006
1,190
539
Irvine
Name
Mike_I
Boat
Cabo 216 First Love
I agree, here's the forecast for today. We had a quick squall go by in Irvine.

"Isolated thunderstorms will be possible through this afternoon across the coastal waters and the coast, with lightning, small hail, gusty and erratic winds and
waterspouts being the associated hazards."


You were very close to getting hit with lightning. This same thing happened to us in Key West right before an antenna got hit.
 

PullOnThis

Almost A Member
Feb 28, 2018
228
279
California
Name
PullOnThis One
Boat
Floating beer cooler
Definitely sounds like static gathering on conductive surfaces and discharging - likely very narrowly missed getting struck by lightning.

The reason it might have been just rods and antenna is likely because they were the highest points in the area.

AM radio switched on will also emit that crackling sound right before a lightning strike... pretty trippy.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: Otto

dwaynesda

dwayne
Apr 27, 2003
1,124
611
santee
Visit site
Name
dwayne
Boat
Cabo 216

Signs of an Immediate Strike​


When lightning strikes you or the area immediately nearby, you may experience one or more of these warning signs a few seconds beforehand.




  • Hair standing on end
  • Tingling skin
  • A metallic taste in your mouth
  • The smell of chlorine (this is ozone, which is produced when nitrogen oxides from lightning interact with other chemicals and sunlight)
  • Sweaty palms
  • A vibrating, buzzing, or crackling sound coming from metal objects around you



If you notice any of these signs, it may be too late to avoid being struck and possibly injured or killed. However, if you find that you do have time to react, you should run as fast as you can to a safer location. Running limits the amount of time that both of your feet are on the ground at any given moment, reducing the threat from ground current (lightning that travels outward from the strike point along the ground surface).
 
  • Like
Reactions: Tom123 and TOTW

TOTW

Time On The Water
  • Dec 23, 2005
    1,243
    1,845
    San Diego
    Name
    Chris L
    Boat
    Leo's
    Damn close call! I remember back in the day when all my buddies were in their hair farming phase. We were outside on a stormy morning and I looked over and their freaking hair was standing straight up—not all of it, but like you’d see with the charged balloon experiment. They thought I was nuts at first...I’ll never forget my buddy putting his hand over his head and his eyes bugged out like “WTF is going on?”
    I told them “we’re about to get hit by lightning!” And stupidly went right for the nearest tree. Luckily for us, just like these guys, we never got zapped!
    I wonder what’s the right thing to do offshore? Jump at those rods/antenna and lay them on the deck, or get as far away from them as possible? We talked about this in Captain school long ago, but I can’t remember the protocol...it may have been “good luck, hope you make it”.
     
    Blackfish
    Blackfish
    if you have rubber shoes or boots you are good, as long as you are not touching anything with your hands other parts of your body. But the shear force from the strike might F you up. On a boat, best thing to do is get low as possible, and if you have time, MOVE that boat as fast as you can.
    Upvote 0

    marlyn

    I Post A Lot But I Can't Edit This
  • Dec 18, 2005
    8,650
    5,108
    So Cal
    Name
    mark
    Boat
    21' skiff and 12' portabote recycled from milk jugs
    Happened to us at silver lake in the june loop,All the rods and metal(engine) were humming and lightning bolts were hitting the water all around us but we avoided getting struck i think maybe because we were in a portabote made of pvc?It blew in,wreaked havoc and blew out within 15 minutes.When we got to shore a couple landslides had already taken out the highway.north part of the campground and part of the pack station.
    1617383498003.png
     

    Tin Pangas

    Skipper
    Aug 28, 2010
    356
    713
    Norwalk, Ca U.S.A.
    Name
    Kevin
    Boat
    37 Tollycraft
    Damn close call! I remember back in the day when all my buddies were in their hair farming phase. We were outside on a stormy morning and I looked over and their freaking hair was standing straight up—not all of it, but like you’d see with the charged balloon experiment. They thought I was nuts at first...I’ll never forget my buddy putting his hand over his head and his eyes bugged out like “WTF is going on?”
    I told them “we’re about to get hit by lightning!” And stupidly went right for the nearest tree. Luckily for us, just like these guys, we never got zapped!
    I wonder what’s the right thing to do offshore? Jump at those rods/antenna and lay them on the deck, or get as far away from them as possible? We talked about this in Captain school long ago, but I can’t remember the protocol...it may have been “good luck, hope you make it”.
    good question!! does anybody here know what the right thing to do is?!?!