May 21, 2022
9
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36
Riverside
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Ryan
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I know it’s a dumb question but I’m relatively new to the offshore game. Can anyone explain the difference between the different surface irons and what they do? (Ex Tady 9 vs Tady 4/0) I want to hit the yellows hard this year and want to get them on something other than Flyline rigs.

Also what yould you recommend as far as a good starting point, the must haves, as far as surface and yo yo irons? Company model color? What size leader, rod and reel, mono vs floro? Any help would be greatly appreciated! Thanks guys!
 
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swami 805

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Mar 9, 2016
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Surface iron, go buy a 10’ fat butt ulua and slap a Trinidad 20a full of 40lb on it. Buy a nice assortment or jri surface irons. Go fishing
Yoyo, 6480h or hx with a penn fathom 40n( 2 speed or star drag). Fill it with 80lb braid and top shot of your choice. Grab an assortment of JRI yo-yo irons. Go fishing
There’s a ton of good gear out there to choose from, everyone has their preferences, just proper application of cash
 
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Rubberhook2

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Jan 19, 2007
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Surface iron....Salas 7X light in green sardine and mint sardine

Yo Yo iron...Salas 6X heavy in blue/white, scrambled egg and dorado (green, blue, yellow)

I fish both of these jigs on 50lb.

Countless yellowtail have been taken on these jigs over the years....
 
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hucklongfin

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A Tady 9 is a universal jig. Can be used at the surface or sink out and yo-yo. Heavier than a surface iron but lighter than a yo-yo jig. Similar to the old UFO/Ironman/Sumo #3. Your standard yo-yo jigs are the Salas 6xJr and 6x. The 6x is longer/heavier than the Jr and is better for deeper water or higher drift. Hard to go wrong with blue/white but scrambled egg and birdshit are good too. Tady 4/0 is between the Jr and 6x in weight. These days I mostly use the JRI 6 & 66… they’re brass (heavier) and get down quicker.
 
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jrodda

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    Surface irons are aluminum, yo yos are zinc. A Tady 45 has a more aggressive wobble than a Starman, all have a slightly different wobble. As someone who has purchased more irons in the last 2 years than made casts with irons in the last 2 years, I would boil it down to this: buy a couple 6Xs and either 7x lights or 45s, get all of them in mint or mint/white, and get to work. Forget color experimentation and paralyzing yourself and freezing your bank account with trying all different brands at once, and just get into the rhythm of it, by committing to a tried-and-true product in each category and adapt it to your own style and feel.

    Then once you've worked hard with them for a season, then start to branch out if you see room for improvement on the equipment side.

    I used a Teramar 8' 1-3oz for a jig stick and Sealine SL30SH for about 10 years and recently switched to a UC 800 Mega, and just got an 800 Wahoo for heavier applications that I've yet to use. The Mega is slick. Avet SXJ G2 and JX G2 on them, respectively. 30' topshot of 30# and 30# braid on 1st, 40-60# topshot and 60# braid on the 2nd. I played around with a Tatula 400 baitcaster for iron and it worked nice but I trust an Avet more to hold up to abuse.
     
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    May 21, 2022
    9
    5
    36
    Riverside
    Name
    Ryan
    Boat Name
    N/A
    Surface iron, go buy a 10’ fat butt ulua and slap a Trinidad 20a full of 40lb on it. Buy a nice assortment or jri surface irons. Go fishing
    Yoyo, 6480h or hx with a penn fathom 40n( 2 speed or star drag). Fill it with 80lb braid and top shot of your choice. Grab an assortment of JRI yo-yo irons. Go fishing
    There’s a ton of good gear out there to choose from, everyone has their preferences, just proper application of cash
    Thank you for the advise!
     
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    May 21, 2022
    9
    5
    36
    Riverside
    Name
    Ryan
    Boat Name
    N/A
    Surface iron....Salas 7X light in green sardine and mint sardine

    Yo Yo iron...Salas 6X heavy in blue/white, scrambled egg and dorado (green, blue, yellow)

    I fish both of these jigs on 50lb.

    Countless yellowtail have been taken on these jigs over the years....
    Kool thank you!
     
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    May 21, 2022
    9
    5
    36
    Riverside
    Name
    Ryan
    Boat Name
    N/A
    Surface irons are aluminum, yo yos are zinc. A Tady 45 has a more aggressive wobble than a Starman, all have a slightly different wobble. As someone who has purchased more irons in the last 2 years than made casts with irons in the last 2 years, I would boil it down to this: buy a couple 6Xs and either 7x lights or 45s, get all of them in mint or mint/white, and get to work. Forget color experimentation and paralyzing yourself and freezing your bank account with trying all different brands at once, and just get into the rhythm of it, by committing to a tried-and-true product in each category and adapt it to your own style and feel.

    Then once you've worked hard with them for a season, then start to branch out if you see room for improvement on the equipment side.

    I used a Teramar 8' 1-3oz for a jig stick and Sealine SL30SH for about 10 years and recently switched to a UC 800 Mega, and just got an 800 Wahoo for heavier applications that I've yet to use. The Mega is slick. Avet SXJ G2 and JX G2 on them, respectively. 30' topshot of 30# and 30# braid on 1st, 40-60# topshot and 60# braid on the 2nd. I played around with a Tatula 400 baitcaster for iron and it worked nice but I trust an Avet more to hold up to abuse.
    Kool I’m an avet guy myself! I was planning on using my Phenix axis 909j paired with either a star drag Mxj or my JX
     
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    Encinoman

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    Jan 4, 2013
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    You can categories surface irons into roughly 3 sizes; small, medium, and large.

    To name a few:

    Small: tady aa, a1, c, salad 7x jr., j pot, Jri 1,
    Medium: tady 45, 4/0 light, jri 2,3, dw1
    Large: salas 7x, jri 4

    From there it comes down to conditions and trial and error. If fish are on small bait, a tady a1 would probably be a better bet than a 7x and vice versa if they’re on bigger bait.

    Some jigs swim like a fast wind and others like a jri 3 swim better at a slower pace.

    Color can matter occasionally but a good swimming jig with no paint will usually outfish a dud with a brand new paint job.

    If you like fishing mono and traditional glass jig sticks, it’s a bit difficult to find one set up that throws all sizes of jigs well. A 690j or 530 with 30lb is great for small to medium jigs for the 3 bs and smaller yellows, but won’t throw a big jig well and doesn’t have the horsepower to fish foaming bluefin or home guard yellows on structure. While a 93 ulua or 100j mag and 50 lb is perfect for the bigger jigs.

    Braid and an 8-10 foot graphite or composite rod gives a bit more flexibility when it comes to the range of jigs you can throw and some blanks have a surprising amount of backbone. A us90 monster, gf90j, or really any 9 foot 20-50 or 30-60 composite rod with a fathom 25n or equivalent reel and a 3 foot 40-60 fluoro or mono leader will get you by on most situations, but does take some time to get used to.

    For the yoyo jigs, any 7-8 foot 40-60 lb rod and 40-60 mono or 80 braid to 50-60 leader will fit the bill. You can fish a 500 size star drag, but a Baja special or fathom 40n or other equivalent size 2 speed makes life easier. Casting isn’t too much of a concern, the goal is to have the jig moving quickly through the depth range fish are marking at.

    One option that can fish well at the islands, especially around squid beds, is fishing a smaller yoyo like a tady 9 or salad 6x jr on the long rod. Long casts and pumping it off the bottom can be effective. Alternating 10-15 rapid cranks and freespooling allows you to stay in the zone and cover a lot of water. I caught my biggest yellow on the jig thus far (37lbs) like this on 6x jr in 60 degree water at sbi in November. But definitely don’t recommend doing this around structure, you just won’t get your jigs back.

    Your 909j with an mxj with a few hundred yards of braid to 75-100 yards of 40 mono or straight 80 braid would cover the majority of surface iron needs, and any 7-8 foot 50lb stick with the same line set up would be great for the yo-yo.

    A few light jigs to start with would be a couple salas 7x, tady 45, and a tady c or 2. I’m partial to mint or mint white, but scrambled egg, blue/white, green sardine (birdshit), or dorado all get bit too.

    For the yoyo, a couple salas 6x and 6x jrs in scrambled egg and blue/white will usually be more than enough.

    Eventually you’ll collect more jigs than you can ever fish, and you’ll probably use a select few religiously.
     
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    stuman

    Brawndo the thirst mutilator
    Sep 18, 2004
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    How to fish different JRI's - somebody should do one for Salas and Tady.


    Yoyo info
     
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    May 21, 2022
    9
    5
    36
    Riverside
    Name
    Ryan
    Boat Name
    N/A
    You can categories surface irons into roughly 3 sizes; small, medium, and large.

    To name a few:

    Small: tady aa, a1, c, salad 7x jr., j pot, Jri 1,
    Medium: tady 45, 4/0 light, jri 2,3, dw1
    Large: salas 7x, jri 4

    From there it comes down to conditions and trial and error. If fish are on small bait, a tady a1 would probably be a better bet than a 7x and vice versa if they’re on bigger bait.

    Some jigs swim like a fast wind and others like a jri 3 swim better at a slower pace.

    Color can matter occasionally but a good swimming jig with no paint will usually outfish a dud with a brand new paint job.

    If you like fishing mono and traditional glass jig sticks, it’s a bit difficult to find one set up that throws all sizes of jigs well. A 690j or 530 with 30lb is great for small to medium jigs for the 3 bs and smaller yellows, but won’t throw a big jig well and doesn’t have the horsepower to fish foaming bluefin or home guard yellows on structure. While a 93 ulua or 100j mag and 50 lb is perfect for the bigger jigs.

    Braid and an 8-10 foot graphite or composite rod gives a bit more flexibility when it comes to the range of jigs you can throw and some blanks have a surprising amount of backbone. A us90 monster, gf90j, or really any 9 foot 20-50 or 30-60 composite rod with a fathom 25n or equivalent reel and a 3 foot 40-60 fluoro or mono leader will get you by on most situations, but does take some time to get used to.

    For the yoyo jigs, any 7-8 foot 40-60 lb rod and 40-60 mono or 80 braid to 50-60 leader will fit the bill. You can fish a 500 size star drag, but a Baja special or fathom 40n or other equivalent size 2 speed makes life easier. Casting isn’t too much of a concern, the goal is to have the jig moving quickly through the depth range fish are marking at.

    One option that can fish well at the islands, especially around squid beds, is fishing a smaller yoyo like a tady 9 or salad 6x jr on the long rod. Long casts and pumping it off the bottom can be effective. Alternating 10-15 rapid cranks and freespooling allows you to stay in the zone and cover a lot of water. I caught my biggest yellow on the jig thus far (37lbs) like this on 6x jr in 60 degree water at sbi in November. But definitely don’t recommend doing this around structure, you just won’t get your jigs back.

    Your 909j with an mxj with a few hundred yards of braid to 75-100 yards of 40 mono or straight 80 braid would cover the majority of surface iron needs, and any 7-8 foot 50lb stick with the same line set up would be great for the yo-yo.

    A few light jigs to start with would be a couple salas 7x, tady 45, and a tady c or 2. I’m partial to mint or mint white, but scrambled egg, blue/white, green sardine (birdshit), or dorado all get bit too.

    For the yoyo, a couple salas 6x and 6x jrs in scrambled egg and blue/white will usually be more than enough.

    Eventually you’ll collect more jigs than you can ever fish, and you’ll probably use a select few religiously.
    This is more or less what I was looking for thank you so much for this info! Would you recommend a longer/lighter rod for smaller jigs?
     
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    Encinoman

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    Jan 4, 2013
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    This is more or less what I was looking for thank you so much for this info! Would you recommend a longer/lighter rod for smaller jigs?
    For smaller jigs absolutely, though you you can go too light if you have an aggressive casting style.

    You can throw a tady a1 a long way on a heavier jigstick with an aggressive cast, but you won’t always be in the correct position to make that cast which will make it difficult to properly load the lighter jigs.

    Something physically lighter and a bit softer like a rainshadow 1089 loads very well on the light stuff even in tight spots.

    I like graphite for the really light jigs, but if you have smoother casting style, a 690j is pretty nice.

    It’s tough to find one rod to do everything.
     
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    lowprofile

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  • Dec 11, 2011
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    The Salas 6x will do both. It’s heavy and sinks fast but also casts really far! It’ll swim on the surface or as a yo-yo.
    Tady 4/0 is similar but from my experience needs a quicker retrieve.

    I like 45’s and C’s if you need it to truely be called a surface iron but I’ve caught more on the 6x doing both. The lighter surface irons are better when casting into kelp too because they aren’t already at the bottom when you engage the reel.

    I wish Sumo lures would come back
     
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    Rubberhook2

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    690J is definitely are great jig throwing rod but I also killed a bunch of cbass on one at SBI dropping jigs straight down at night...
     
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    Nicechrisman

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    Anyone else using coltsniper type jigs for similar application to traditional surface and yoyo irons? Seems to me they are a more modern improvement on the older designs but I certainly understand the appeal of vintage traditions
     
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    Encinoman

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    Anyone else using coltsniper type jigs for similar application to traditional surface and yoyo irons? Seems to me they are a more modern improvement on the older designs but I certainly understand the appeal of vintage traditions
    Colt snipers work great, and will make just about anyone feel like badass at casting…

    Jokes aside, they’re excellent when just about anything is keyed in on small bait. you’ll generally catch a much wide variety of fish than you will on a surface iron or yoyo, and there’s really no wrong way to fish them.

    Most of the time I have one tied on is when chasing foaming bluefin. Sometimes they eat the small shiny jigs better than a surface iron or popper. Definitely make sure to upgrade the hooks when doing this, and don’t fish anything less than 60.

    For your standard island yellowtail fishing, I have far more confidence in the traditional jigs, but I seriously doubt the fish really care. Get something moving in front of a hungry one and you have a shot.
     
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    Nicechrisman

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    Colt snipers work great, and will make just about anyone feel like badass at casting…

    Jokes aside, they’re excellent when just about anything is keyed in on small bait. you’ll generally catch a much wide variety of fish than you will on a surface iron or yoyo, and there’s really no wrong way to fish them.

    Most of the time I have one tied on is when chasing foaming bluefin. Sometimes they eat the small shiny jigs better than a surface iron or popper. Definitely make sure to upgrade the hooks when doing this, and don’t fish anything less than 60.

    For your standard island yellowtail fishing, I have far more confidence in the traditional jigs, but I seriously doubt the fish really care. Get something moving in front of a hungry one and you have a shot.
    Yeah fair point about by catch although I'm not above having fun fishing for bonito too. Another point of why I think they may be superior for yo yo is because they are lead, so they descent better in current without drifting as much. At least that seems to be the case for me
     
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    Encinoman

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    Yeah fair point about by catch although I'm not above having fun fishing for bonito too. Another point of why I think they may be superior for yo yo is because they are lead, so they descent better in current without drifting as much. At least that seems to be the case for me
    Bonito on colt snipers is an absolute blast and some of the best poke you’ll have (if properly taken care of).

    Regarding colt sniper vs yoyo, the colt sniper can be a solid yoyo alternative, but there’s something about a good swimming yoyo jig that just gets bit really well.

    SoCal traditional surface iron/yoyo fishing is almost cultish. In reality they aren’t always the absolute best tool for the job. We would likely be more efficient fishing popping rods with high end spinners for the surface iron, or Japanese style speed jigging in lieu of the yoyo.

    With that being said, there’s something special about catching fish the way that it’s been done here for long time, and I don’t think we’ll see that change any time soon.
     
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    Rubberhook2

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    Snipers are very effective and I too always have one tied on when targeting tuna. The majority of my bites come on the sink and those small jigs just get inhaled which increases the risk of a chew off even on 60lb...

    IMG_5626.jpg
     
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    Encinoman

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    Snipers are very effective and I too always have one tied on when targeting tuna. The majority of my bites come on the sink and those small jigs just get inhaled which increases the risk of a chew off even on 60lb...

    View attachment 1457040
    Couldn’t agree more. 60 minimum for small to mid grade fish, and if the bigger models are around, 60 is asking for heartbreak. 80-100 flouro is a much safer bet and really should be the starting point. 130 isn’t out of the question either.
     
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