Stuff I've learned

Discussion in 'San Diego Long Range fishing Reports' started by freegaff2, Sep 4, 2018.

  1. freegaff2

    freegaff2 Well-Known "Member"

    Name:
    Craig Simcox
    Boat:
    none
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    started this game in 1981 on the Q105. I have learned from others on every trip I've been on...some things have become truth over time, not because I thought them up, but because they are.
    1.There is a negative force that dulls all trolling, and bomb and Raider hooks between trips. Put a new point on them, or pay the price.
    2. None of the people I know are used to eating the richly sauced food the boats now prepare. Never trust a fart on a LR trip.
    3. Trust the Captain...if he asks for a vote on where to go in the galley, ok...voice your opinion. Don't take it personal if he goes the other way. Don't offer your opinion if he doesn't ask. He is the one you paid all that money for when you booked the trip. He has HISTORY. Trust it.
    4. If you see a deckhand walk up to the bow after dinner...don't follow him up to tell him how bitchin' the fishing was that day. He just might be looking for a place to get 10 minutes away from the job, to let his mind go where he wants it to go. He might have been on the boat for 13 days straight, and is having wife/girlfriend problems because of that. It is a tough life to choose...particularly in the area of family and relationships. Give him a break. when he's on the back deck, tell him it was a hell of a head gaff ;)
    5. Don't ever piss off the cook...even if he's wrong, he's not.
    6. Cut your alcohol consumption until you get your sea legs...guy on a trip before one I was on got hammered, and fell down the stairs while at the ridge...compound fracture of the femur. They had to get a splint on in the hallway...said you could hear the screams in the wheelhouse. Still blood on the carpet...he had to lay in the hall until they got to Cedros, where a plane picked him up(more screaming). Gives me goosebumps just typing that.
    7. Eat a half a banana a day, or a full serving of potato...both very high in potassium. Buddy had a heart attack at Clarion, had to life flighted out of Socorro by the Coast Guard...sweated all the potassium out of his body in that hot, humid weather.
    8. If there is an active duty LE guy on board, let him sit in the booth facing the rear door. It's a training, and personal safety thing, and he isn't going to get over it in 5 to 16 days. I retired 7 years ago, and haven't carried for 4 years...I can sit anywhere now. But it was important...when it was important.

    What are your pearls of wisdom, honed by time ;)
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2018
  2. whyworry

    whyworry Newbie

    Location:
    Phoenix,/Arizona/US
    Name:
    Darren
    Boat:
    boatless
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    Here is one I will never forget. This was not my first trip but I will never forget it. I was on a Pac Voyager 4.5 day trip (short trip so just YT/YFT). I am on a good sized yellow on the starboard side of the stern with the fish straight up and down. The YT decides to take a hard right turn towards the port corner. Of course there are already a half dozen guys in a total mess in front of me. Captain Mark gives me a big grin, calmly walks over to me, takes my rod and reels down almost to the water, takes the reel out of gear and thumbs the spool just to keep tension. He points the stick straight down and walks calmly and slowly underneath all the chaos to the port corner, puts the reel back in gear and hands it back to me. I take the fish a few more feet around the side and right to gaff. The lesson I learned now applies to all SW fishing. If you can stay calm enough to assess the situation, make a wise decision, you will land many more fish.
     
  3. FishRock

    FishRock I've posted enough I should edit this section

    Location:
    Alaska
    Name:
    JAM
    Boat:
    Thunnus - 22' Koffler BayBee (1990)
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    You will enjoy your trip just as much as you let yourself, regardless of how good or bad the fishing is.
     
  4. Steve K

    Steve K Hey, I'm gettin' bit...

    Location:
    Bishop
    Name:
    Steve
    Boat:
    18' Bayrunner, but I like the American Angler and the Red Rooster III
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    Two things, one recent, and as obvious as can be. On a fish coming into the stern, still out on an angle, but... Nick told me I was going to want to go to a corner. I started to say something about how it was straight out and he came back with telling me, he’d only been doing this for 19 years, but you can do whatever you want. I quickly, humbly, asked, “Port or Starboard?” Point? Listen to the crew.

    Second, as time has gone by, I realize you should take a trip as long as you can afford, whether the consideration is cost or time away. And, a trip with as light a load as you can find. I’ve fished with as many as 32 and as few as 18. Gotta add a new line to my sign off, “Lighter Loads”
     
  5. RockHopperNCKA

    RockHopperNCKA Well-Known "Member"

    Location:
    Santa Rosa, CA
    Name:
    Dustin
    Boat:
    Do kayaks count?
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    I think three of the most important lessons are drilled into people's heads at the very beginning, and throughout the entire trip and a ton of people just can't seem to grasp the concept.

    1 - If your bait hits the water and doesn't take off within a few seconds, grab a new one! I see so many people dicking around with baits that want to hang out under the boat.

    2 - When you do get a bait to swim good, follow it!

    3 - If that bait leads to a hook-up, follow that fish, too!

    It's like the very first things you're told on the boat, but so many people just don't get it.
     
    Nebraska, Steve K, AndyJ and 5 others like this.
  6. DMcD

    DMcD Well-Known "Member"

    Location:
    Idyllwild, Ca USA
    Name:
    Dennis McDougall
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    None
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    Once the fishing starts (or if possible, before it starts), keep you eyes and ears open and as quickly as possible identify who is "that guy" is, or "those guys" are, and do whatever you need to do to avoid them...if you don't, at some point its gonna cost you some hard earned fish.
     
  7. carcass

    carcass Well-Known "Member"

    Location:
    Cedar City Utah
    Name:
    scott
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    1. If others around you are hooking up regularly and you are not, you are probably not adjusting to the bite as they are.

    2. You are never as smart as you think you are.

    3. You cannot run fast enough to catch up to a Wahoo moving towards the bow.

    4. If you can't seem to get a bite in the daytime, fish at night and before first light.

    5. You can't catch a fish if you are not in the water (Big fish Bob)
     
  8. Fishybuzz

    Fishybuzz fishybuzz

    Location:
    Tucson
    Name:
    David Tang
    Boat:
    Intrepid
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    Great thread....My remarks pertain mostly to cow fishing but some parts can be applied to any type of long range fishing and some to life in general.

    I don't know if this fits but I have met some fantastic people that I never would have in my normal life...brothers and sisters from another mother, individuals who I am confident will be friends long after I hang up my rods and reels we discuss life family and lots of things other than fishing....

    I learned when you are in the stern and a 200# tuna wants to go to the bow you will end up in the bow or lose the fish...

    I learned that there are no short cuts in preparation, be it mental, physical or equipment when it come to Long Range cow fishing ...mentally you must endure long hours at the rail, bad weather, no current, bad bait, 25 knot wind and through it all fish your last bait with as much enthusiasm and attention as your first..... you must physically be able to fight these giants for hours because sometimes that is what is required.....I learned there are no shortcuts in preparing your equipment these fish will exploit the weakest link in you gear every connection your drags your rod, or you...yes we hear about the exceptions but as a rule your equipment must be sano.

    I learned it really isn't just about the fish any more....it is the adventure of being on the open ocean on a quest....the possibilities...seeing the joy when someone achieves his or her goal.....

    I have learned to treasure every moment out there...because they are brief...I have lost many friends over the years who I shared priceless moments....enjoy it all.

    and I quote

    "The problem is we think we have time".
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2018
  9. bob1825

    bob1825 I've posted enough I should edit this section

    Location:
    San Fernando Valley
    Name:
    Jason
    Boat:
    Anyone the fits my schedule
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    Great thread, here are some of the things that I've learned over the years:
    1. For the most part all of the long range boats are good. They've been doing it along time and have it down. Each has its own personality and you might prefer one over another but if you go in with the right attitude you will have fun and make new friends
    2. Find a trip that fits your schedule and book it, don't sweat the small small stuff it will usually work out
    3. Find "That Guy" and try to stay away from them when fishing otherwise you could be in for a long trip!
    4. Don't let "That Guy" ruin YOUR trip, he will always be an A$$hole but you'll only have to be around him for the length of the trip, he and others have to live with him
    5. I only worry about limited loads based on the size of the boat. Thirty-two people on the Excel might be more roomy than 24 on a much smaller boat
    6. If you aren't catching fish and everyone else is then look to see what they are doing that you aren't. Ask questions.
    7. If one or two guys are catching and nobody else is asking, ask them what they are doing, they'll usually share their "secret"
    8. If you notice someone isn't catching fish think about offering some help. One my first long range trip I wasn't catching tuna at Alijos, Sean T., captain of the Legend at the time, was on my trip with his son. He saw me struggling to get bit and came over and asked me to wind in so he could look at my hook. He simply said your hook is too big (i think it was an Owner 2/0 Circle Hook), so he walks away and comes back later with a handful of smaller hooks, simply drops them in my hand and walks away. I spent the next 1.5 catching 60-90# YFT at the Rocks. Ended the trip with more than 20 fish.
    9. Listen to the crew, they have willingly shared "insider tips" with me for years, and write them down so you don't forget them.
     
  10. Let em eat 74

    Let em eat 74 Well-Known "Member"

    Location:
    Irvine
    Name:
    Kevin
    Boat:
    Whichever1is leaving
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    The moment you think you know everything
    Is the moment you stop learning anything.

    Even when they are both healthy, sometimes the smaller bait is better.
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2018
  11. BluefinCurly

    BluefinCurly Skipper

    Location:
    Norwalk
    Name:
    Carl
    Boat:
    Vagabond, The Last Minute
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    Great thread!

    I'll boil it down to one:

    If you listen more than you talk, you will learn a great deal more.
     
    locvetter, bkaz, Shon and 5 others like this.
  12. afraser

    afraser I've posted enough I should edit this section

    Location:
    sf, ca
    Name:
    aaron
    Boat:
    NA
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    1) Don't get pissed at losing a fish, even if it was someone else's fault. You will catch more fish and losing a fish once in a while is part of the experience. That said...
    2) Don't be an ass and throw in right next to someone who is hooked up. If you hook even a skippy, you will saw them off.
    3) Sit when you can. I tend to spend more hours than most at the rail, so sitting when I can makes a huge difference at the end of the day. Especially easy if you fish the bow early in a stop with no one up there. No one can stand 18 hours a day for 5-8 days and be at their best if a big fish bites.
    4) Wake up at 2-3am, just to see. You never know. Been rewarded several times.
    5) Or, ask a deckhand to wake you if anything is around. I don't care what time it is or how long I slept. If the bluefin or yft are under the boat, I'd rather be up trying.
    6) Overdrink water. Drink what you need, then a bit more. Have a water bottle next to your tackle box so you don't have to think about it. Cramps suck.
    7) If you have a lot of rods, plan your rigs ahead of time, even bring a list. Cut my rigging time by 1/3.
    8) If fishing is slow, try something different. New bait, different hook placement, new jig color, jig when everyone is bait fishing or vice versa (especially for wahoo). If you want to try something, just do it as long as it doesn't mess anyone else up. It's your trip.
    9) If its crowded, do all your rigging up top.
    10) Don't tighten your drag until you eliminated any line angles and are sure others aren't across you. Less likely to get sawed off this way (learned that last trip)
    11) Put sunblock on before you need its, especially if there isn't anything going on.
    12) Bring gloves. I use them religiously, but even if you don't better to have them in case you do need them as a result of catching too many fish.
    13) Keep somie rubber bands and a torpedo weight handy. If you want to drop under everyone, you can quickly put it on and be fishing a different plane than everyone else.
    14) Make sure your lures and hooks are pointed away from the walking area. All lures should be at the reel or way above head height. How many times do you see a lure with treble hooks hanging mid way on a rod? Even worse, under tension!
    15) Don't wrap your hand around your line to test it when its in the water.
    16) Bring backup of your critical tackle. Eg. glow flatfalls, 100 and 130# fluoro, small topedo sinkers, your preferred hooks, uv flashlights, wahoo bombs in preferred colors. The boat does run out of things sometimes and often others don't have it.
     
  13. shellback

    shellback Well-Known "Member"

    Location:
    templeton/morro bay
    Name:
    shellback
    Boat:
    other peoples
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    adapt and change quickly to different conditions. don't be a hardhead thinking "it worked this way last time..."

    ive caught enough big fish at this point to just have fun with the experience, the people and gods great ocean
     
  14. clevel

    clevel Captain in Learning

    Location:
    Laguna Niguel
    Name:
    Cabo Jack
    Boat:
    Cobia 261
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    He/she is the more persistent will catch the most fish!
     
  15. SouthBayKiller

    SouthBayKiller I've posted enough I should edit this section

    Location:
    Long Beach, CA
    Name:
    Robert
    Boat:
    none
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    #1) RELAX, its just a fishing trip.
     
  16. Holi-e-Mackeral

    Holi-e-Mackeral Holi-e-Mackeral

    Location:
    Orange County, CA
    Name:
    Jeff
    Boat:
    Royal Polaris - sold the boat
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    Attitude,

    The very finest anglers I’ve been fortunate enough to share a long range boat with, always remain positive even when they are having a slow or challenging trip..

    We have all seen guys have a meltdown after multiple days without a bite, often they are trying to hard.. I’ve learned to step away from the rail, drink a beer, take a time out and spend some time watching what is going on.. Often this short break improves your karma and you begin to catch more than wish.

    Jeff
     
  17. Bill W

    Bill W tunaholic

    Location:
    Chino Hills, Ca.
    Name:
    Bill Walsh
    Boat:
    Red Rooster
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    Unless there is another fish on, which there was not, you need to get in the right place. The fish will fall in to line when he circles and has no reference when he is on his side. Up in the bow on the Rooster the sweet spot at the end of the bridge house.
     
  18. talltales

    talltales Member

    Location:
    Ridgecrest Ca
    Name:
    ron
    Boat:
    2359 Trophy
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    I have this on the inside of my box:
    Fishing is about spending time on the water, maybe catching a few fish and getting away from everyday life, be it for a few hours, a few days or a few weeks. Remember you’re on vacation; enjoy the trip, the sights, the boat and the people.

    Fish like you may never get to fish again.
     
  19. swami 805

    swami 805 I've posted enough I should edit this section

    Location:
    805
    Name:
    Bill
    Boat:
    sunk it
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    If the boat is on the anchor fish. You can sleep when you get home
     
  20. bkaz

    bkaz Pharmfisher

    Location:
    Novato, CA
    Name:
    BKAZ
    Boat:
    None
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    1. Always be courteous and respectful to your fellow fisher-people. Don't go running down the rail yelling at others to get out of the way because you have a fish on.

    2. Listen to the crew.

    3. Listen and learn something from others giving advice. I am always learning something every year I go.
     

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