Start Up Gear

Discussion in 'Hawaii Fishing Reports' started by OSGF, Nov 6, 2009.

  1. OSGF

    OSGF Newbie

    Location:
    Aiea
    Name:
    Derek
    Boat:
    14' Livingston
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    Any recommendations on the minimum gear needed for trolling? I see reels on Craigslist all the time, but I have no idea what I need. I usually dive the reef, but I would like to start trolling a little for shibis, aku, mahi, onos, etc.
     
  2. youngkid

    youngkid Newbie

    Location:
    Oregon
    Name:
    cameron
    Boat:
    none... i wish :(
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    shakespeare tiger rods. shimano tld or charter (new tld's are really good) reels. anything in the 30-60 lbs range should do just fine. thats more so for like mahi and other medium sized class fish. wich im guessing is what you'll most likely catch. but if your after like large shibi, then i aould up your gear power/strength by a bit. you will probably need a few medium sized rods for mahi and ono, and larger ones for shibi. just a thought. aku arent that big, so you can have allot of fun with these guys with like small gear in the 20 lb. range.
     
  3. beauchat

    beauchat Newbie

    Location:
    Kaneohe,Hawaii
    Name:
    Russ
    Boat:
    17 Radon
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    A reel that can hold 50-80 lb. test at the least. The lighter line the more strikes but also more lost fish. Personally 80lb is the minimum for me but I use 80lb for ulua from shore. For offshore I use 100lb minimum. The basic reel would be a penn senator. You cant go wrong with penn senators, plenty parts available and easy to fix.Penn and shimano gold reels if you have the cash and can afford.

    Mahis and small aku/shibi can be caught with 20lb (bare minimum) on up. bigger shibi, and ono Id say 50lb at the least.

    My 14 livingston was a great riding boat BUT there were no built in safety features such as a self bailing hull or bilge pump. Make sure the boat can get you there and back safely. West side should'nt be a problem for that boat but Ive fished kaneohe all my life and would never go offshore in my livngston unless im in waianae. Also the livingston didnt have rod holders built in. Make sure you have solid rod holders installed that have been bolted in with backing plates so that they can withstand a big strike.

    As far as rods go, match the rod to the LB test your using. Daiwa beef sticks are cheap as f**k but would do the job. You might as well buy right the first time though.
     
  4. youngkid

    youngkid Newbie

    Location:
    Oregon
    Name:
    cameron
    Boat:
    none... i wish :(
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    if it were me, i would either get a proline boat or a mako boat. very nice, hardcore looking medium sized fishing boats
     
  5. dausualinc

    dausualinc Newbie

    Location:
    Honolulu
    Name:
    Kekoa
    Boat:
    30' Knife
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    9/0 Senators are usually a good starting point.
    Pros- Inexpensive,durable, easy to service, parts availablility, Holds decent amount of line.
    Cons- Low gear ratio (not always a bad thing!), not flashy ( won't help you get laid.)

    You can use a 9/0 to medium tackle troll, jig, and bottom fish and if you decide that offshore fishing isn't for you, you didn't spend a fortune and you can probably sell them easily. One of my 9/0s has caught a 200lb ahi on it, granted it was baiting and not trolling so the line capacity was not as critical. I have mine spooled with 130lb jinkai which has a smaller diameter than many other lines.
     
  6. youngkid

    youngkid Newbie

    Location:
    Oregon
    Name:
    cameron
    Boat:
    none... i wish :(
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    i think that that would be a little over kill for medium sized fish. i really think you only need like something in the 50-60# range for all of these fish. i mean, gear is gear, no fun if you cant put your gear to the test
     
  7. beauchat

    beauchat Newbie

    Location:
    Kaneohe,Hawaii
    Name:
    Russ
    Boat:
    17 Radon
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    All about the bling, even when you go fishing. When I get my gold reels ( whenever that may be) im gonna use them to trailer my boat to the harbor then swap them out for my senators right before I head out for the day.
     
  8. cheehuli

    cheehuli Newbie

    Location:
    Kaneohe Hi.
    Name:
    Chase
    Boat:
    24' Custom Sampan "Girlie T"
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    I believe the folks steering you towards the penn 9/0 have got it right on. It's a great reel and very affordable. Once you step up to 12/0 and bigger the $$ goes UP. I would recommend spooling em with heavier line as well, since you could get bit by something big, even when targeting the small to medium stuff. I rather have chance fo' release a marlin, or keep an ahi; instead of letting it get away with a whole spool of 50 trailing behind it. IMHO 50 is better suited to more expensive reels with smoother, very consistent drags. my 2 bits.
     
  9. Antares

    Antares The popcorn police

    Location:
    San Diego/Maui
    Name:
    Drew
    Boat:
    29'
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    I would go small 50lbs test class. 6/0 or TLD are great. I just picked up 4 tiagra 30LRS and 2 50W LRS even better if you can afford. I would back every reel with spectra so when you find the big ahi you can beat it. Catching mahi and ono with 9/0 12/0 80W ect is not fun. using 30 and 50 is and i like to have fun.
     
  10. Smudge

    Smudge Moderate

    Location:
    Hollywood, FL
    Name:
    Matt
    Boat:
    I'm just a deckhand...
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    Look at the names and locations of the people recommending 9/0's and 80w's and then look at the names and locations of the people recommending 30's and 50's... There is a reason that nearly every boat you see out here is rigged with big reels...
     
  11. CMonster01

    CMonster01 Newbie

    Location:
    Honolulu
    Name:
    Clifford
    Boat:
    Big enough to float without it
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    Smudge is dead on. Ahi come up on the ledge, not to mention marlin (we used to get them in green water sometimes back in the 70's - have not heard of it happening on Oahu for a long time, but it still might). Marlin sometimes hit hooked tuna as well and bugger light tackle here. Anyhow, I don't like senator drags especially for smaller tackle. Better to go gold up front if you can afford it (cheaper to buy used); you can probably compromise more on the rods (i.e., more bend for lighter fish if you want to feel the pull better).
     
  12. DaBigOno

    DaBigOno Member

    Name:
    Al
    Boat:
    Nora Lee
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    how much money you GET?!
     
  13. Hinalea

    Hinalea Newbie

    Location:
    Kalapalama Canal
    Name:
    Bodo
    Boat:
    Sears Gamefisha 12' Tri Hull
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    Minimum gear for trolling... the most minimumist I can think of for trolling on your 14' ivingston is handline. Cheap, efficient, and effective. Then if you and your boat can get on the fish, then upgrade to some rods and reels if you like start spending some money. If you like rod and reel action from the get go, I would go with new/newer shimano TLD's. Cheaper than the golds, but still get nice feel and performance and capable for what you like catch. Main thing, wash, lube, and take care of your stuff, then you can get decent money if you want to sell them and upgrade to more pricey stuffs. I would recommend staying away from the 9/0 to 14/0 penns if you can afford to. They usually have pretty junk drag and slow gear ratios compared to the more modern outfits. I've never fished a Penn senator that I enjoyed.
    Aloha, Hanapaa
     
  14. Antares

    Antares The popcorn police

    Location:
    San Diego/Maui
    Name:
    Drew
    Boat:
    29'
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    Very good eyes my friend but what you missed is the mountain in the background is Haleakala. I have fished Maui for the last 20 years. In fact only 2 days a go did my boat ship to San Diego. 50 class gear backed with spectra will beat any thing you want to catch on a 14 foot boat and it will be fun
     
  15. oldmanadam

    oldmanadam Newbie

    Location:
    kailua,hi
    Name:
    adam lahne
    Boat:
    22' fiberform "amateur hour"
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    minimum to get out there and have some fun? i run two 6/0's w/80lb braid, a okuma catalina55 and a handline. they all caught fish. the handline is sweet in a boiling otaru pile. just rip em in. caught my share of ono/mahi/aku/shibi. never got bit by a big fish, would have to guess it's a losing battle on a marlin or a shibi over 40lbs. of course, I've been looking into tld50s and penn intl 50s. upgrading is always a good thing. main thing, get out there and hook up. If you lose a couple, no big deal. theres always more.
     
  16. OSGF

    OSGF Newbie

    Location:
    Aiea
    Name:
    Derek
    Boat:
    14' Livingston
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    K, Mahalos for the advice. I'll keep my eye on Craigslist and eBay.
    When I've gone trolling (on other people's boats) there's always been multiple lines in the water, sorta at staggered distances behind the boat. But if I only have one or two lines, how far behind the boat should I keep the lure?
     
  17. dausualinc

    dausualinc Newbie

    Location:
    Honolulu
    Name:
    Kekoa
    Boat:
    30' Knife
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    Derek- you have a few different opinions from some very different schools of thought, which is a good thing. I don't think the intent of this thread was to debate the virtues of the penn senator, I use um because that what I can afford, I keep them well serviced to they work as well as you could expect them to (never lost a fish to reel related failure). If money were no object I would have 5, 130 class tiagras accross the aft deck and a few Torsa 30's in the rack on my fly bridge. Ok enough day dreaming. Bottom line buy what you can afford/make you happy all of the reels mentioned have caught lots of fish, and could do the same for you. Nothing wrong with starting off with 2 lines, you will have less headaches with tangles if you are just starting out. Try to keep the lures in clean water (less whitewash) Actual distance is going to depend on so many things, type of lure, weather conditions, type of fish targeted. Just go out and try, the only thing you could do wrong is staying home when you could be fishing- aloha
     
  18. LongRigger

    LongRigger Newbie

    Location:
    Honolulu, Hawaii, USA
    Name:
    John
    Boat:
    50 ft Custom Sportfisher
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    If all your ganna target is mahi and ono on the troll then 50's would be the way to go. Get yourself a standup harness and have some fun with it. On the troll you can target bigger tunas with 50's you just have to be smart about it, guys in Cabo and Puerta Vallerta have been doing it for a while now. Better knots, crimbs, line ect.... if your ganna devote time to catching big tunas and marlin on 50's. A couple years back a frined of mine caught a 200 poound marlin on a TLD 30 in a mahi school, he thought he was pitching to a mahi, ended up being a nice blue.

    Starting out i would say get the 50's and have some fun fighting aku's, shibis, onos and mahis stand up style.
     
  19. munsen13

    munsen13 Newbie

    Location:
    Molokai
    Name:
    IA
    Boat:
    17' Montauk
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    Senators are affordable and easy to work on (parts available) been around a long time and they get the job done.
     
  20. patfishhi

    patfishhi Registered User

    Location:
    Oahu
    Name:
    Pat
    Boat:
    32' Blackfin "Kai Nana"
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    When fishin' the Atlantic with a bunch of friends back in the mid 80's, senators were the reels of choice (cost prohibitive to upgrade), we caught fish up to 300+ (BFT's), so they can handle some demanding tasks. Since fishing Hawaii late 80's, started off with penn senators and the Daiwa Sealines (9-0's), I liked the daiwa drags better. But the drag surface on either of those reels are dwarfed by a real 50. 1996 upgraded to Tiagra 50's and have never looked back. Exclusively a stand up tackle person, the most important item in a boat when stand up is gunnel height; if it is not mid thigh DON'T try stand up tackle there is a good chance you'll end up in the water still attached to the fish, trust me. The most important bit of gear when stand up is a very good belt and harness, so don't skimp on that stuff. So the advice is 9.0's are good to get started (for Hawaiian waters).
    As far as position; there are so many things to consider, the engine noise, wake profile, boat beam, where you put the lure in the wake, etc.etc.. Marlin aren't shy and will crash lures on the 3rd wake even on a boat with a narrow beam. Since smaller fish are your quarry, keep the lures small 7" or less (anything still will eat a 7 or 5" lure) maybe the 4th to 7th wake (hell who knows); originally we fished 9-0's with 80 and stopped some pretty decent fish. 50w's with the right kind of manuevering will get some monster fish, if you are lucky.
    Don't agonize over some of this stuff get out there fishin' and figure it out, there is no better instructor than experience.

    GOOD LUCK! If you figure out the luck part the rest is easy...

    Pat
     

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