Stacking Wolf Like Cord Wood

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OffLimits

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A judge in Boise, Idaho allowed a wolf and coyote derby in southern Idaho. Unfortunately no wolf were harvested but 17 (ish) coyote were killed. Up here in the north the wolf are so over populated we are finding herd bulls (elk and moose) along with their offspring attacked by the wolf. Why? Because some dumb fuck (sorry dad) liberal from Florida that owns a chihuahua thought it would be a good idea to re introduce the wolf to our area. Trappers and aggressive wolf hunters say they have been "stacking wolf like cord wood."

Are the wolf over populated in your area? Is there any secret to this madness?

Smoke a pack a day!!
 
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Aggro

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I hate them things worse than Mt Lions.
 
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KWyoming

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We have a pack behind the ranch as we speak but the area is closed. In August 2 wolves wounded a nice cow moose within a half a mile of the ranch and ate nothing. We also found 15-20 cow elk partially eaten in May. Would love to have a wolf derby here in the Hoback!
 
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OffLimits

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[QU Tyo min g;3312874]We have a pac k behind the ranch as we speak but the area is closed. In August 2 wolves wounded a nice cow moose within a half a mile of the ranch and ate nothing. We also found 15-20 cow elk partially eaten in May. Would love to have a wolf derby here in the Hoback![/QUOTE]

the snow is getting deep up high. They are now taking cattle, pets, and tracks have been spotted close to bus stops. You know if the wolfs ate patchouli those dog loving hippies would allow poison.
 
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middleofnowhere

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Wolves are part of nature. They should not be rendered extinct so greedy ranchers and herders don't have to hire more hands to safeguard their herds/flocks. If you have a few less elk or moose to hunt because some of God's creatures are doing what they are supposed to do, so be it. If you want a manicured park like forest without predators move to Europe.
 
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OffLimits

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My daughter is going to fit right in here, I don't know if that is good thing.;)

Well Dad Grandma isn't on here to bitch at me. She's ruined my facebook. I can't rant about hippies, and post bloody animals without some sort of non sense. :) Here everyone is doing the same!
 
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invictus

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Well Dad Grandma isn't on here to bitch at me. She's ruined my facebook. I can't rant about hippies, and post bloody animals without some sort of non sense. :) Here everyone is doing the same!

Ahhh, just like home!! LOL

I am going to hunt the Palouse area next year and have been hearing about the Wolf issue a while. They are exceptional predators and hear they run the herds for days, on top of killing, this also runs the overall herd health down, making them more susceptible to starvation and disease.

I think the answer is management.
 
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aeon

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sigh... where to start with this. First if you are going to bring god into it, genesis 1:26 your god says i can manage them to my hearts content. Next, the wolf that they introduced is not the same wolf that lived here way back when. So what you have now is a wolf that is not native introduced into a target rich environment.

by your logic we should reintroduce the grizz so so cal. You know they were all over here in Orange County. I am sure that will go over great. It's sad to say but in the lower 48 there are no vast tracks of unspoiled land where nature can find a balance. IT all has to be managed and managed well or it will fail. Right or wrong we are the apex predator and we have displaced the other apex predators.


Wolves are part of nature. They should not be rendered extinct so greedy ranchers and herders don't have to hire more hands to safeguard their herds/flocks. If you have a few less elk or moose to hunt because some of God's creatures are doing what they are supposed to do, so be it. If you want a manicured park like forest without predators move to Europe.
 
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abdiver7777

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200x200px-ZC-b2fdb6ac_lozGr_GIF_Collection_of_someone_eating_popcorn-s360x240-181194-580.gif
 
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ConSeaMate

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Really?.....this won't end well....
[h=1]Wolves on the West Coast[/h] Wolves were once common along the West Coast, from the Olympic Peninsula of Washington state through Oregon to the far reaches of Southern California. As keystone predators, wolves play a vital role in regulating prey populations like deer and elk, and in so doing benefit a host of species. In forcing elk to move more, for example, wolves have been found to increase streamside vegetation and, along with it, beaver and songbird populations.
Decades of extermination programs to accommodate the livestock industry drove wolves out of West Coast states in the late 1800s and early 1900s. The last wild wolf was documented in California in 1924, when it was shot in Lassen County. The last breeding wolves in Washington were eliminated in the 1930s, and in Oregon the last wolf was killed for a bounty in 1946.

Today the West Coast is a region crucial to wolf recovery. As wolf populations have expanded in the northern Rocky Mountains, the animals have moved west. As these populations reach new areas, they need state and federal protections to ensure they aren’t exterminated again.
In fact, when a wild wolf reached California in late 2011, ranchers quickly called for a “shield” to block the entrance of other wolves; some even vowed to shoot wolves on sight.

That’s why the Center for Biological Diversity petitioned California to protect wolves under the state Endangered Species Act. In August 2012 the California Department of Fish and Game responded to the petition, recommending that the Fish and Game Commission make the gray wolf a candidate for protection under the state's Act.

Although wolf recovery efforts in the northern Rocky Mountains and the Great Lakes have met with success, wolves in the lower 48 states still occupy less than 5 percent of their historic habitat. Yet the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has stated it intends to remove protections for wolves in the lower 48 states, including the West Coast.
If the United States is going to continue recovering its wolf population — and if it wants to retain authentic wilderness within its borders — then it needs the West Coast, which is one of the best places for wolf recovery with plenty of suitable wolf habitat and a largely supportive human population.

In August 2012 the Center and 23 other conservation organizations sent a letter to President Barack Obama asking for continued Endangered Species Act protection for wolves in the Pacific Northwest.
[h=3]WASHINGTON[/h] The first reliable reports of wolves returning to Washington came in 2002. Washington now has 10 confirmed, and two probable, wolf packs in the eastern and central portions of the state (as well as two “border packs” that travel in Washington at times but mostly live outside the state). As of March 2013, prior to pupping season, Washington’s wolf count included five successful breeding pairs and at least 51 individuals.

Scientists have identified several additional wild areas in Washington that wolves could occupy, including the Olympic Peninsula.

Congress stripped wolves in the eastern third of the state of their federal Endangered Species Act protections. All wolves in the state remain protected under the state’s Endangered Species Act. The Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission approved a wolf-management plan in 2011.

The 2013 legislative session saw the introduction of eight anti-wolf bills. Working closely with allies in the state, the Center helped defeat all eight bills and get funds secured in the state budget for wolf conservation, management and research. This summer, when the state wildlife commission adopted rules violating the wolf plan regarding when wolves can be killed, we and our allies petitioned the state to make its wolf plan legally enforceable.
[h=3]Oregon[/h] Wolves started returning to Oregon in 1999, and the first pack, the Imnaha, was established in 2008. There are now seven confirmed packs in eastern Oregon, including seven breeding pairs. Counting pups born during 2013, as of October, Oregon’s wolf population now stands at a minimum of 75 wolves.

Scientists have identified several other wild areas in Oregon that wolves could occupy, including extensive habitat in the Cascade and Siskiyou Mountains.

Congress stripped wolves in the eastern third of Oregon of their federal Endangered Species Act protections. All wolves in the state remain protected under the state’s Endangered Species Act. The Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission approved a wolf-management plan in 2005.

State wildlife officials in the fall of 2011 ordered the killing of two members of the Imnaha pack, including the alpha male. The Center and allies went to court and secured a temporary stay on the killing. For nearly two years no wolves could be killed for wolf–livestock conflicts, and the state wildlife agency and ranchers relied solely on nonlethal, conflict-prevention measures. During that time, the wolf population nearly doubled and wolf–livestock conflicts declined. As a result of our lawsuit, wolves have stronger protections in Oregon.
[h=3]California[/h] For the first time in more than 85 years, a gray wolf was documented in California in December 2011. The 2 ½-year-old male, known as OR-7 or Journey, traveled more than 700 miles from the northeastern corner of Oregon and crossed into California’s Siskiyou County. After nearly 15 months exploring seven different Northern California counties, Journey traveled back into Oregon in March of this year. Since leaving his Oregon birthpack, the Imnaha pack, he has traveled more than 4,000 miles. In February 2012 the Center and allies filed a petition to protect wolves in California under its state Endangered Species Act, and the state will soon be making a final decision on that protection. The state wildlife agency is currently developing a wolf-management plan.



Idiots.......stupid idiots......
 
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middleofnowhere

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sigh... where to start with this. First if you are going to bring god into it, genesis 1:26 your god says i can manage them to my hearts content. Next, the wolf that they introduced is not the same wolf that lived here way back when. So what you have now is a wolf that is not native introduced into a target rich environment.

by your logic we should reintroduce the grizz so so cal. You know they were all over here in Orange County. I am sure that will go over great. It's sad to say but in the lower 48 there are no vast tracks of unspoiled land where nature can find a balance. IT all has to be managed and managed well or it will fail. Right or wrong we are the apex predator and we have displaced the other apex predators.

OK, I retract the God reference.

Wolves should be a part of the environment just like the GWS off our coast. And yes, I do wish we still had the Santa Ana Grizzly here in California. Please let me pick the people to remove so there is room for griz habitat.
 
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invictus

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sigh... where to start with this. First if you are going to bring god into it, genesis 1:26 your god says i can manage them to my hearts content. Next, the wolf that they introduced is not the same wolf that lived here way back when. So what you have now is a wolf that is not native introduced into a target rich environment.

by your logic we should reintroduce the grizz so so cal. You know they were all over here in Orange County. I am sure that will go over great. It's sad to say but in the lower 48 there are no vast tracks of unspoiled land where nature can find a balance. IT all has to be managed and managed well or it will fail. Right or wrong we are the apex predator and we have displaced the other apex predators.

Oh at this rate, we will have wolves, in less than 10 years.
 
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OffLimits

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Maybe you antis missed the subject?
1. The wolf were REINTRODUCED to the area. Therefore it had NOTHING to do with nature doing its job. Like I said someone spent milllions of dollars to drop wolf in the area. Sort of like when they spent a few million to bring caribou from Canada to North Idaho within a few days they were back across the border. Prior to all of this the wolf were still killing in the mountains doing their job. Maybe you are unfamiliar with how wolves reproduce. With 8-10 pups per litter vs. the moose or elk with only one and the slight chance of two calf/calves. The wolfs are over populating.

2. Is arguing going to bring common ground? It's a shame google can't buy you an education.
 
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middleofnowhere

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Bottom line, predators are healthy for their prey. Because we humans have already upset the ecosystem to such an extent, sound management is key now. Wolves can be a key management tool to help improve game populations. I know the interests pushing for the wolves reintroduction have different motives, but ultimately wolves in our wild places will be good for everyone.

I hope some day to bag a wolf, and I would love to do it in my home state, just a dream though :(
 
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KWyoming

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I hope some day to bag a wolf, and I would love to do it in my home state, just a dream though :([/QUOTE]

You may have wolves sooner than you think. Doubt you will ever be able to hunt them in California. The problem is there is no end to the prey base. If they can not kill an elk they kill cattle, sheep, llamas, horses and dogs. Then regardless of our lack of management the wolf is killed. I can not even turn my dog out at night to take a dump in the winter and spring. California at one time had one of the highest populations of grizzly bears in North America, we have a ton of them and I am sure the game and fish would be happy to relocate some to your area. The bottom line is if the wolves are not controlled you are going to have a smaller population of Ungulates, therefore rather than starve they are bound to kill livestock and pets. We have had several dogs and horses killed in our area and I would be happy to forward you photos of dogs killed within 40 yards of a guys house. Making the prey base healthier is not my observation here in NW Wyoming. One wolf is more than capable and does in fact kill Healthy Moose and Elk when the snow is deep and crusty or in the spring when they are thin or about to calf. The elk are much thinner in the spring now than they were pre-introduction as measured by the Game and Fish (rump fat measurements). The Northern Yellowstone elk herd stands at about 5000-6000 today over 20000 in 1996. The Jackson Hole Moose herd was at 4000 now less than 500. These problems are in our back yard. I have no problems with wolves, I have problems with not controlling their population and the unrealistic idea that we can go back 200 years. Yes maybe they did self regulate pre -European settlement, but you must understand that at that time the ecosystem was much different from todays landscape. It seems funny to me that many people would love to go back 200 years if it effects someone else, but not if it effects their life and ability to make a living. Not trying to bash, just trying to give you my view of the situation after having been a wilderness guide and rancher for 30 yrs.
 
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Blackfish

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http://news.discovery.com/earth/first-gray-wolf-in-california-since-1924-120229.htm

Soon, the howls of gray wolf packs may once again serenade the moon above the Golden State. (SO ROMANTIC)
On Dec. 28 of last year, a lone male gray wolf, known as OR7, entered California after roaming from his homeland in northeastern Oregon, according to the California Department of Fish and Game (DFG). Young male wolves (Canis lupus) often move away from where they were born, in a behavior known as dispersal. But OR7′s dispersal made history.
Two-and-a-half year-old OR7 is the first wolf observed in California since 1924, when the last wolf in the state was shot. OR7′s arrival isn’t a surprise.
“With growing wolf populations in Oregon and Washington, it’s inevitable wolves will be moving back into California in the near future,” Noah Greenwald, endangered species director for the Center for Biological Diversity, t
 
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