Slow trolling macs/deens

Discussion in 'Fishing Chit Chat' started by SEANIKEN, Jul 7, 2015.

  1. SEANIKEN

    SEANIKEN Newbie

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    Sean
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    How far back do you prefer to slow troll bait? I know some guys drop weights in their bellies and some don't. I'm sure it doesn't matter too much. Main question.... Do you just nose hook them and toss them back?

    Thanks for the help!
     
  2. Fleet

    Fleet Thepowderblues.com

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    Fishing Jedi
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    I thumb the spool at a very slow speed. I just put the boat in gear at its slowest speed. Force the bait to swim. No weights. Hook through the nose and i think im out around 40 yards or so. Barely moving as far as speed goes. 1mph or so.
     
  3. PCH

    PCH El Nino 2015!!!!!!

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    Drop weights in their bellies? Depends how strong the baits are and how the game fish are responding.
     
  4. dave_k

    dave_k Member

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    typically idle speed, about 100-150 feet back for me. Last weekend a little faster and closer to boat was working best for some reason. Macs can run a little faster. Sometimes slider, sometimes straight flyline. I usually rig each line a different way until we key in on what they want. Weight in the belly isn't going to last too long, I'd recommend a slider, or even a torpedo a few feet ahead of the bait if you want to get deeper. If there are lots of bones and cuda, a sinker can make a huge difference in getting to the yellows. I almost always nose hook for this, shoulder hook works but beats and the bait up a lot faster.
     
  5. Fishnfunky

    Fishnfunky Member

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    At the islands for yellows no more than 10ft behind the boat at idle speed and another at 20ft. You would be amazed at how close they come to the boat to eat. Had one literally 2 ft behind the outboards hook up
     
  6. Vsanchez949

    Vsanchez949 Newbie

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    Been wondering about this. DO you use any swivels to the hook? what about a swivel if you use weight?
     
  7. Tuna Vic

    Tuna Vic I've posted enough I should edit this section

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    Great question,looking forward to more info on this subject,will definitely be put to use this season!
     
  8. dave_k

    dave_k Member

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    i just tie straight to the hook, no swivel. If you're doing it right, your bait will just swim along so there won't be any like twist. If your bait is skipping or spinning, you're going to fast, or your bait is dead.

    Don't over think it. It's the same as fishing a live bait while drifting. Fish in freespool, get bit, let the fish run, then put it in gear and wind.
     
  9. SEANIKEN

    SEANIKEN Newbie

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    Tons on great information! Thanks fellas… Sounds like its pretty much live bait fishing with clickers on and boat in gear. I could understand using weights in the bellies if you were trolling dead bait at a faster pace, but that doesn't seem like the way to do it. How many baits/rods are most of you trolling?
     
  10. Carl

    Carl Bridesmaid,,,,,,,Again

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    On a typical small boat 3 is max for slow trolling. Run the one in the middle shorter(15yds or so) than the other two to minimize tangles. On the outside baits drag them with the hook pointing away from the boat as this encourages the bait to swim away from the opposite lines.

    In other words from the port corner the hook point should exit the left (port) side of the baits grill.

    When making turns do it wide or pray a lot unless you like tangles.
     
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  11. dave_k

    dave_k Member

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    Agreed, 3 is usually the max. But if I've only got 2 guys, we're fishing 2 rods. I don't use clickers, just freespool with thumb on the spool. Clicker on and in the rod holder can work, but I find you'll get bit and spit a lot like this. Keep just enough tension on the spool with your thumb to prevent the bait from running, lots of times the bites will be light.
     
  12. MYNomad

    MYNomad Heading South

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    My minimum speed with trolling valves is around 1.5 knots. That seems to present the bait just fine without killing it. At 2.3 knots, a lot more ground is covered (which, everything else being equal, would increase my hookups by about 50%), but that's when the bait dies quicker and probably swims funnier. The fact that I don't get 50% more strikes at that speed tells me that everything else isn't equal. In the middle, at 2 knots (without current), seems to be best. So, to paraphrase the world's most fascinating man "I don't always slow troll, but when I do I troll at dos knots."
     
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  13. SEANIKEN

    SEANIKEN Newbie

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    Definitely gonna put these techniques to work at the end of the month. Thank you
     
  14. bparker1225

    bparker1225 Ocean Addiction

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    Two other suggestions, I often hook my Macs in the shoulders just behind the head for slow trolling. I think that they live longer and troll better. Also, with a needle and 30 pound spectra push the needle thru the nose with a short loop then put your hook through the loop and spin it. I learned this from pangeros in Cabo but they use dental floss. The bait swims much more freely.
     
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  15. sandiegosteve

    sandiegosteve Fish nerd

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    I usually have circle hooks and for some reason they have a tendency (not always) to make my baits spin when nose hooked. To help, I will hook them from under the jaw up through the top of the mouth. Troll pretty slow 1-2knts. Around the kelp, 50-100' back. Offshore by paddies, sometimes further back as I make wide passes on the kelp (lead to many dorado hookups that way).
     
  16. crabdancer

    crabdancer Kook

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    Definitely gotta love wide turns.

    I fish 8-9 foot bait sticks straight out of the rod holders on the rail just fore of the console, so the tips are about 20' apart.

    Down the middle I fish a rubber band and torpedo sinker 10' above the bait (Thresher mooching style). That line's run a bit shorter than the other two.

    The trolling motor does it even better than the outboard and I can run it with the foot pedal when I get busy. I stick to J hooks but set them like circles. Stagger the distance on the rigs with no weight. No such thing as a bait that's too big as long as you've got the right hook. I fish the clicker because I'm solo a lot. The Trinidad adjustable clickers are cool for that, but I imagine the new smaller lever drags are even cooler. I try to run with the current and watch the birds and the meter. The fish will come right to the boat, but I run a little more distance in case fish come up and I want to drag the bait through them without running the spot over. Hooking the bait between the back of the skull and the dorsal fin is good.

    Honestly, once you get the spread figured right for your boat, it's some beer drinking catfishing. Good luck.
     
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