Slow pitch jigging rods

J.AkuHed

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I am seeing a lot more slow pitch jigging on YouTube, so what about the rods? What are the lengths, action and line classes? I am throwing 70g - 150g with a Phenix Black Diamond inshore INS866ML, 10-30# with Penn FTH25N. I see that Tsunami has a slow pitch acid wrapped rod 7'6" , 20-40#.
 

PE Pete

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Hey Jim, I'm really enjoying slow pitch.
I currently use an Evergreen Poisiden 603 3,
Jigstar slow jerker 603 2 and two Synit Pitchblack #4.
The number 2,3 or 4 relate to a power rating which will give you a guide to line weight and to an extent lure weight.
Like most jigging systems there will be a line rating on the rod and recommend jig weight but jig weight can be played around with a bit. IE. 603 2 suggests a recommended jig weight of 2oz or 60g but that same blank could with a softer action work a jig weight of twice the recommended value or more.
I've used 210g jigs on my Poseidon 3.
 

ShadowX

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Slow pitching is fun... Pretty exciting to feel the jig hit the bottom and you know its not on the bottom. Usually its a big fish biting the jig and you're on! They love to hit the jigs on the way down. Once you get the feel down, you know when to wind and set the hook.
 

PE Pete

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Yeah bro that moment when the line goes slack mid pitch is gold...
Another aspect I've noticed is species that we would normally expect to find hard on the bottom will come up to take a decending jig and/or follow a ascending jig.
Gotta love slow pitch...
 

benwah22

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I am seeing a lot more slow pitch jigging on YouTube, so what about the rods? What are the lengths, action and line classes? I am throwing 70g - 150g with a Phenix Black Diamond inshore INS866ML, 10-30# with Penn FTH25N. I see that Tsunami has a slow pitch acid wrapped rod 7'6" , 20-40#.
The general length of a slow pitch rod is from 6'3 to about 6'8. Longer rods are geared toward the long fall technique, which is essentially lift and drop. These rods go from about 7'6 to 7'10.

Line class isn't a consideration here like it is with traditional fishing rods. You use the rod to move the jig, not to fight the fish. Generally, higher quality rods use micro guides, which would not support heavier line than, say, 50lb test or PE4. Also, jig ranges are all relative as, again, higher quality rods will be able to work heavier jigs in deeper water. So, just because a rod is rated for "60g" jigs, that's not necessarily the parameters to follow. I understand, it's complicated, but such is the game.

With regard to Tsunami, save your money. Diplomatically put, they are less than ideal, even at the price point. Based on feel when fishing the rod, it appears that they took a fast action inshore blank, changed around the reel seat and called it a slow pitch rod. The action is very poor. Some people don't mind it, but I cannot think of any dedicated slow pitch anglers that use them, for what that's worth.
 

el Toro

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Help me understand this. Don’t you want a rod to fight the fish? Seems crazy to think otherwise. Why can’t you have a rod that will do both? Or use a rod that will adequately fight the fish, yet while also allowing you to work the jig. What am I missing?
 

ShadowX

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The general length of a slow pitch rod is from 6'3 to about 6'8. Longer rods are geared toward the long fall technique, which is essentially lift and drop. These rods go from about 7'6 to 7'10.

Line class isn't a consideration here like it is with traditional fishing rods. You use the rod to move the jig, not to fight the fish. Generally, higher quality rods use micro guides, which would not support heavier line than, say, 50lb test or PE4. Also, jig ranges are all relative as, again, higher quality rods will be able to work heavier jigs in deeper water. So, just because a rod is rated for "60g" jigs, that's not necessarily the parameters to follow. I understand, it's complicated, but such is the game.

With regard to Tsunami, save your money. Diplomatically put, they are less than ideal, even at the price point. Based on feel when fishing the rod, it appears that they took a fast action inshore blank, changed around the reel seat and called it a slow pitch rod. The action is very poor. Some people don't mind it, but I cannot think of any dedicated slow pitch anglers that use them, for what that's worth.
The Tsuanmi rods are perfectly fine for slow pitch fishing. I caught 25 lb yellowtails with them with no problem. Not everyone wants or can afford a Black Hole, Poseidon or Synit Rods for a very niche application. I have a couple of the Black Hole and Synit rods for tuna fishing. The action of the Tsunami is the most similar to the Shimano Tescata rod, which is very specific to fishing the Lucanus jigs. You can't beat the cost/value of the Tsunami rods over any of the other rods listed. It may not be the best rods, but it defnitely has the action of a slow pitch rod. I prefer the Tsunami rods over my BH rods for bottom fishing for rockfish. The action of the rod tip allows good control of your lures in deep water. The BH rod tip is a bit more stiffer and it is harder to maintain a constant control of the lure action compared to Tsunami rods with lighter jigs.

BTW, if you didn't know, Synit just went out of business. Its sad to see what happened to the company since Tiny died. They are closing this year. They are selling the last of their current stocks. The announcement was on their FaceBook page.


 
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benwah22

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Help me understand this. Don’t you want a rod to fight the fish? Seems crazy to think otherwise. Why can’t you have a rod that will do both? Or use a rod that will adequately fight the fish, yet while also allowing you to work the jig. What am I missing?
A slow pitch rod can be used to fight the fish to an extent, bu you must know it's limitations. Generally the fight is done with the butt end of the rod, essentially keeping the rod parallel to the water, and lifting with the reel seat rather than raising the tip.

As to being crazy to think otherwise - why? From what I've found, pointing the rod toward a fish and cranking has proven to be a much more efficient fight than the traditional lift and pump. I've landed larger fish in a shorter period of time doing so consistently. It also reduces angler fatigue. So, from that perspective, it make perfect sense.

As to why you can't have a rod to do both, the nature of a slow pitch rod is that the blank is very thin, likely half the diameter of a traditional bottom rod or less. I've attached a picture at the bottom showing one of my Temple Reef Levitate rods with Accurate DFS Slammer reel next to an old school glass rod. It's a pretty striking difference. Additionally, a slow pitch rod has to be elastic enough to adequately work a jig. The holy grail of rod manufacture would be to have a rod that you can really tug on but that is also effective to impart the correct action on the jig. So far, manufacturers have gotten really good at making a tough rod, or, really good at making a rod that works a jig very well. The Levitate series is the only rod that I've fished that comes close to doing both, but even that has its limitations.

PSX_20171104_203741.jpg
 

benwah22

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The Tsuanmi rods are perfectly fine for slow pitch fishing. I caught 25 lb yellowtails with them with no problem. Not everyone wants or can afford a Black Hole, Poseidon or Synit Rods for a very niche application. I have a couple of the Black Hole and Synit rods for tuna fishing. The action of the Tsunami is the most similar to the Shimano Tescata rod, which is very specific to fishing the Lucanus jigs. You can't beat the cost/value of the Tsunami rods over any of the other rods listed. It may not be the best rods, but it defnitely has the action of a slow pitch rod. I prefer the Tsunami rods over my BH rods for bottom fishing for rockfish. The action of the rod tip allows good control of your lures in deep water. The BH rod tip is a bit more stiffer and it is harder to maintain a constant control of the lure action compared to Tsunami rods with lighter jigs.

BTW, if you didn't know, Synit just went out of business. Its sad to see what happened to the company since Tiny died. They are closing this year. They are selling the last of their current stocks. The announcement was on their FaceBook page.
I'm not getting into a contest over whose opinion is correct or not, but I would like people to be able to make an informed choice. Its undisputed that the pioneer of slow pitch rods in Japan is made by Evergreen. Whether you fish them or not, they are very, very good at working a jig. Not the best at fighting a fish, but one of the best for rod action. Here is a video of the Evergreen Poseidon working a jig. It's markedly different (and objectively superior) to the Tsunami rod in every measurable way.


After personally fishing every rod you've mentioned, including the Tsunami, I stand by my assessment of the Tsunami rod as it relates to slow pitch jigging. If you want to speed jig a little slower for yellowtail off California and call it "slow pitch,", go right ahead, but putting some lipstick on it won't change its performance. The Shimano Tescata rod is fine for Lucanus style jigs. Maybe the Tsunami is too. But the Shimano Tescata is certainly not a slow pitch rod, and working a Lucanus style jig is nothing like working a slow pitch jig. So there's that too.

I personally don't care what rod someone chooses to fish, but very much care about their ability to make an informed choice as to what they are buying. And, I get it, buying a very expensive slow pitch rod for a niche application is out of a lot of anglers' price range. So, if you are ok with the action that the Tsunami rod will produce, then by all means. But I think it's disingenuous to say it can hold a candle to any dedicated slow pitch rod.

With regard to Synit, Synit is ceasing to build factory rods, but will still be selling blanks. You can still get them through Garone custom rods in the US.
 

el Toro

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So are we doing it wrong when we tie a flat fall to a traditional 80 pound set up with a two speed reel? They still seem to get bit and catch fish fine (so is the rod not adequately working the jig?), and I surely want some backbone, not a wet noodle, when hooked up to a jumbo. Right? Not arguing, just trying to learn.
 

benwah22

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So are we doing it wrong when we tie a flat fall to a traditional 80 pound set up with a two speed reel?
It would depend on your fishery. I wouldn't take a slow pitch rod out to fish for cow tuna, that's for sure. But, if you can follow some fundamental principles of slow pitch jigging, then maybe you can scale back drastically. I personally use 30lb Daiwa J-Braid. We've tested it out extensively and it breaks at about 46lbs (give or take). I don't have a reel in my arsenal that puts out over 30lbs of drag, and for our fishery, it's the perfect balance of strength versus thin line diameter. Personally, I can't remember the last time a fish broke a line just by pulling (abrasion is entirely separate).

If your particular fishery requires you to fish 80lb braid, then maybe traditional slow pitch jigging isn't a good fit. That's always a possibility too. But, I think with some tweaking, you'll be surprised as to what you can accomplish with it.
 

hucklongfin

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I tend to use slow pitch jigs to work near the bottom with the long fall technique so a conventional rod works fine. If you're going to work the water column back up using a slow or fast pitch retrieve a 'real' slow pitch rod is needed to put the correct action on the jig. Me? I do the long fall technique (even mid column) then just retrieve it back like a yoyo jig.
 

el Toro

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It would depend on your fishery. I wouldn't take a slow pitch rod out to fish for cow tuna, that's for sure. But, if you can follow some fundamental principles of slow pitch jigging, then maybe you can scale back drastically. I personally use 30lb Daiwa J-Braid. We've tested it out extensively and it breaks at about 46lbs (give or take). I don't have a reel in my arsenal that puts out over 30lbs of drag, and for our fishery, it's the perfect balance of strength versus thin line diameter. Personally, I can't remember the last time a fish broke a line just by pulling (abrasion is entirely separate).

If your particular fishery requires you to fish 80lb braid, then maybe traditional slow pitch jigging isn't a good fit. That's always a possibility too. But, I think with some tweaking, you'll be surprised as to what you can accomplish with it.
That pretty much answers my question, thanks. Yeah, we fish 200 and 250 gm flat falls for cows with #80 braid and #130 flouro leaders. I don't see traditional slow pitch working. So we have to fake it on gear that is actually capable of landing the fish.
 

hucklongfin

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I am seeing a lot more slow pitch jigging on YouTube, so what about the rods? What are the lengths, action and line classes? I am throwing 70g - 150g with a Phenix Black Diamond inshore INS866ML, 10-30# with Penn FTH25N. I see that Tsunami has a slow pitch acid wrapped rod 7'6" , 20-40#.
Eh Brah, they had you at "acid wrapped"!
 

PE Pete

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Hey Alex, not sure what you mean by your statement regarding what's happened to Synit since Tiny died?????
What happened is Graeme and CJ have taken a fledgling local business to an internationally renowned market leader.
There are genuine personal reasons for the closure of the business.
 
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PE Pete

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I think with the right gear and positive outlook most fisheries can be targeted using slow pitch.
As above....
 

ShadowX

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Hey Alex, not sure what you mean by your statement regarding what's happened to Synit since Tiny died?????
What happened is Graeme and CJ have taken a fledgling local business to an internationally renowned market leader.
There are genuine personal reasons for the closure of the business.
I didn't see them state the reasons for the business decisions. Either
I'm not getting into a contest over whose opinion is correct or not, but I would like people to be able to make an informed choice. Its undisputed that the pioneer of slow pitch rods in Japan is made by Evergreen. Whether you fish them or not, they are very, very good at working a jig. Not the best at fighting a fish, but one of the best for rod action. Here is a video of the Evergreen Poseidon working a jig. It's markedly different (and objectively superior) to the Tsunami rod in every measurable way.


After personally fishing every rod you've mentioned, including the Tsunami, I stand by my assessment of the Tsunami rod as it relates to slow pitch jigging. If you want to speed jig a little slower for yellowtail off California and call it "slow pitch,", go right ahead, but putting some lipstick on it won't change its performance. The Shimano Tescata rod is fine for Lucanus style jigs. Maybe the Tsunami is too. But the Shimano Tescata is certainly not a slow pitch rod, and working a Lucanus style jig is nothing like working a slow pitch jig. So there's that too.

I personally don't care what rod someone chooses to fish, but very much care about their ability to make an informed choice as to what they are buying. And, I get it, buying a very expensive slow pitch rod for a niche application is out of a lot of anglers' price range. So, if you are ok with the action that the Tsunami rod will produce, then by all means. But I think it's disingenuous to say it can hold a candle to any dedicated slow pitch rod.

With regard to Synit, Synit is ceasing to build factory rods, but will still be selling blanks. You can still get them through Garone custom rods in the US.

I'm not getting into a contest over whose opinion is correct or not, but I would like people to be able to make an informed choice. Its undisputed that the pioneer of slow pitch rods in Japan is made by Evergreen. Whether you fish them or not, they are very, very good at working a jig. Not the best at fighting a fish, but one of the best for rod action. Here is a video of the Evergreen Poseidon working a jig. It's markedly different (and objectively superior) to the Tsunami rod in every measurable way.


After personally fishing every rod you've mentioned, including the Tsunami, I stand by my assessment of the Tsunami rod as it relates to slow pitch jigging. If you want to speed jig a little slower for yellowtail off California and call it "slow pitch,", go right ahead, but putting some lipstick on it won't change its performance. The Shimano Tescata rod is fine for Lucanus style jigs. Maybe the Tsunami is too. But the Shimano Tescata is certainly not a slow pitch rod, and working a Lucanus style jig is nothing like working a slow pitch jig. So there's that too.

I personally don't care what rod someone chooses to fish, but very much care about their ability to make an informed choice as to what they are buying. And, I get it, buying a very expensive slow pitch rod for a niche application is out of a lot of anglers' price range. So, if you are ok with the action that the Tsunami rod will produce, then by all means. But I think it's disingenuous to say it can hold a candle to any dedicated slow pitch rod.

With regard to Synit, Synit is ceasing to build factory rods, but will still be selling blanks. You can still get them through Garone custom rods in the US.
You're comparing a $500 rod to a rod that cost less than $100. There is no doubt the Poseidon rod has better action. I won't argue against that. However, to label another rod not meeting the criteria of a slow pitch rod based just on the angle is absurd. There are lots of factors including jig weight that affects the angle and how the rod blank is wrapped. At some point, it be comes semantics. Even the type of slow pitch jig and the shape of the jig may affect how the rod loads up.
 
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ShadowX

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Hey Alex, not sure what you mean by your statement regarding what's happened to Synit since Tiny died?????
What happened is Graeme and CJ have taken a fledgling local business to an internationally renowned market leader.
There are genuine personal reasons for the closure of the business.
I didn't see them explaining the reason when they posted that on FB. Besides, I deleted my FB account and don't care much about FB posts anymore. Its good they would continue to sell blanks. I recall reading that they design their blanks, but another company manufactures them. It would make sense to continue with the blank designs since it would require less business overhead costs since they are not doing the actual manufacturing.

I agree they make great rods. I wore their Tshirt on one of the visits to the Fred Hall Show and most people have never heard of them. I think the US market tends to popularize the models from Japan and US markets, but New Zealand products are not as well known. Obviously Synits are great rods, but its a shame a lot of the people here have never heard of them.
 
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PE Pete

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Hey Alex, we have something in common mate. I don't do FB either.
Don't think Synit needs to explain to anyone why they are stopping manufacturing personally, I think it's kinda their business.
I would also respectfully suggest that Tiny would be very proud and full of aroha nui for what Graeme and CJ have accomplished.
So not sure what you see as sad because I can tell you from personal experience that what Synit has become since Tiny's passing is anything but sad.
 

benwah22

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You're comparing a $500 rod to a rod that cost less than $100. There is no doubt the Poseidon rod has better action. I won't argue against that. However, to label another rod not meeting the criteria of a slow pitch rod based just on the angle is absurd. There are lots of factors including jig weight that affects the angle and how the rod blank is wrapped. At some point, it be comes semantics. Even the type of slow pitch jig and the shape of the jig may affect how the rod loads up.
So this is morphing a bit into personal philosophies. Here's mine.

To address your response directly, you are correct, that's exactly what I'm comparing, and I'm labeling it based on how it fishes (including all of the factors you've mentioned). I know an inshore blank when I feel one. That's what this is. It feels exactly like a Star Stellar Lite 15-25lb casting rod that had the grip re-configured. Great for bottom bait fishing, casting, inshore/near shore stuff. Terrible at working a jig.

I have nothing against the company, and, in fact, I use their ball bearing swivels as I think they are great. If Tsunami's slow pitch rod was marketed for what it actually is, an inshore or light bottom fishing rod, I'd give it a full endorsement - especially at the price point. I wish there was a high quality slow pitch rod in the ~$100 range, as it would allow many more people to get into this super fun and extremely productive style of fishing. As I see it, there's a lot of companies attempting to use the new buzzword of "slow pitch jigging" to get a foothold in the American market before it really takes off. I think the expanding market is awesome, but I also think it needs some perspective.

I've been fortunate enough to have been slow pitch jigging, almost exclusively, for about 6 years now, and have spent literally thousands of hours of sea time doing it, in every possible condition. I've jigged in 30 feet of water, to 1100ft of water. Flat calm to 8 foot rollers. Tackle-wise, I've fished almost every rod on the market, most of the jigs, and damned near every reel. At last count, I've landed over 50 species of fish on slow pitch jigs from a little Tom-Tate to a 80lb sailfish. I'm not writing this to be braggadocios, but rather to say I've got a pretty solid idea of what is what. When I review something it's based on my genuine impression of it, good or bad, so when you say that my impression is absurd, I'd at least like my absurd opinion to be placed in perspective.

Slow pitch jigging is 100% a passion of mine, and due to the nature of the tackle and the cost barriers of entry, my central goal is to get the correct information about it out to those who are new, so they can 1) make an informed choice about what they are buying, 2) not get sold a false bill of goods, and 3) have fun. This game is frustrating with the wrong equipment and people can make costly financial mistakes if they are given bad advice. BD Outdoors is a really great forum to get this information out, and I think it's awesome.

Call me a purist, but even when allowing for variations in technique based on one's fishery and location, there are certain fundamentals that should be consistent, or at least close, in terms of performance. The Tsunami rod has none of those other than the layout of the grip and guides. And even there, the butt end is too short, and the guides are too big. As I mentioned earlier, this has been a very costly game of trial and error for me and I'd like to help people not have to play that same game if possible. In my experience, I have found that it's better to save up a little more money for a higher quality product first than to buy something because it is cheap, which is not to be mistaken for economical. There are some lower priced rods in the market, in the high $200 to low $300 range, that have very good action. The Tsunami series is not one of them.

Just my two cents.
 

Cubeye

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So this is morphing a bit into personal philosophies. Here's mine.

To address your response directly, you are correct, that's exactly what I'm comparing, and I'm labeling it based on how it fishes (including all of the factors you've mentioned). I know an inshore blank when I feel one. That's what this is. It feels exactly like a Star Stellar Lite 15-25lb casting rod that had the grip re-configured. Great for bottom bait fishing, casting, inshore/near shore stuff. Terrible at working a jig.

I have nothing against the company, and, in fact, I use their ball bearing swivels as I think they are great. If Tsunami's slow pitch rod was marketed for what it actually is, an inshore or light bottom fishing rod, I'd give it a full endorsement - especially at the price point. I wish there was a high quality slow pitch rod in the ~$100 range, as it would allow many more people to get into this super fun and extremely productive style of fishing. As I see it, there's a lot of companies attempting to use the new buzzword of "slow pitch jigging" to get a foothold in the American market before it really takes off. I think the expanding market is awesome, but I also think it needs some perspective.

I've been fortunate enough to have been slow pitch jigging, almost exclusively, for about 6 years now, and have spent literally thousands of hours of sea time doing it, in every possible condition. I've jigged in 30 feet of water, to 1100ft of water. Flat calm to 8 foot rollers. Tackle-wise, I've fished almost every rod on the market, most of the jigs, and damned near every reel. At last count, I've landed over 50 species of fish on slow pitch jigs from a little Tom-Tate to a 80lb sailfish. I'm not writing this to be braggadocios, but rather to say I've got a pretty solid idea of what is what. When I review something it's based on my genuine impression of it, good or bad, so when you say that my impression is absurd, I'd at least like my absurd opinion to be placed in perspective.

Slow pitch jigging is 100% a passion of mine, and due to the nature of the tackle and the cost barriers of entry, my central goal is to get the correct information about it out to those who are new, so they can 1) make an informed choice about what they are buying, 2) not get sold a false bill of goods, and 3) have fun. This game is frustrating with the wrong equipment and people can make costly financial mistakes if they are given bad advice. BD Outdoors is a really great forum to get this information out, and I think it's awesome.

Call me a purist, but even when allowing for variations in technique based on one's fishery and location, there are certain fundamentals that should be consistent, or at least close, in terms of performance. The Tsunami rod has none of those other than the layout of the grip and guides. And even there, the butt end is too short, and the guides are too big. As I mentioned earlier, this has been a very costly game of trial and error for me and I'd like to help people not have to play that same game if possible. In my experience, I have found that it's better to save up a little more money for a higher quality product first than to buy something because it is cheap, which is not to be mistaken for economical. There are some lower priced rods in the market, in the high $200 to low $300 range, that have very good action. The Tsunami series is not one of them.

Just my two cents.
So for someone just starting this Slow Pitch jig fishing technique, what rod or manufacturer would you recommend? I would be targeting 20 -30# Yellowtail, and perhaps some larger 60 -80# Bluefin. Perhaps the $300.00 - $400.00 range.

Would the Phenix Titan Slow Jigging rods be something you would recommend?
 

benwah22

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So for someone just starting this Slow Pitch jig fishing technique, what rod or manufacturer would you recommend? I would be targeting 20 -30# Yellowtail, and perhaps some larger 60 -80# Bluefin. Perhaps the $300.00 - $400.00 range.

Would the Phenix Titan Slow Jigging rods be something you would recommend?
The best action rod in that price point is the Temple Reef Gravitate. It retails for about $300 or so. Naturally, people will think this is biased due to my affiliation with the company, but while testing the prototypes of these rods, I beat the hell out of them and really put them through their paces. I can sleep well at night recommending them to anyone. That being said, they have their limitations. In particular, if you plan on fishing heavy jigs in deep water (eg 400g+ jigs in 400ft or deeper), I wouldn't recommend them. But, anything up to that point they are great.

To compare to Temple Reef's flagship, the Levitate, the Gravitate are slightly thinner blanks, slightly more parabolic, and use alconite vs Sic guides (although the same layout). They both use Toray carbon. The Levitate is very very capable of working heavy jigs in deep water while still maintaining just a beautiful action. Objectively, they're the best I've fished.

I've fished the Phenix and while the build quality was great, it was a bit stiff and a little too fast. I think they would shine in deeper water with heavier jigs.

Comparable rods in your price point are Sea Falcon rods, which have a better components than the Gravitate (I think they use titanium guides) but the butt end is a little shorter, and the rod is a bit less elastic than the Gravitate. It's also 6'6 vs. 6'8 as in the Levitate Gravitate, and it is a noticeable difference.

There is a relatively new company called Takamitechnos (I know, a mouthful) that makes a series called MOZ which I've seen land very large fish, but it's one of the few brands I haven't personally fished.

Objectively, knowing what I know now, I would buy the Gravitate and pair it with a black Accurate Valiant 500n for a murdered out, and very capable set up at your price point. I know these rods would handle the yellowtail but I cannot speak to the bluefin. A buddy of mine who I fish with regularly believes they would be able to handle bluefin of that size, and I trust his opinion. But, I cannot personally definitively say that they would work there. Just being honest.
 
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hucklongfin

Deep release specialist
Jul 3, 2003
8,388
5,528
64
Mission Viejo
Name
MarkT
Boat
Blazer Bay 1860
So for someone just starting this Slow Pitch jig fishing technique, what rod or manufacturer would you recommend? I would be targeting 20 -30# Yellowtail, and perhaps some larger 60 -80# Bluefin. Perhaps the $300.00 - $400.00 range.

Would the Phenix Titan Slow Jigging rods be something you would recommend?
Yellowtail are easy. Throw the jig out there, let it sink to the bottom. If you didn’t get hit on the sink, do a couple of long falls (lift way up with the rod and let it free fall back down) then crank it up like a yoyo iron. You only need a specialized slow pitch rod if you’re going to use a slow-pitch or fast-pitch technique on the retrieve.
 
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Cubeye

I've posted enough I should edit this section
Jan 26, 2007
3,155
2,137
Los Angeles
Name
Kub
Boat
17' Gregor
The best action rod in that price point is the Temple Reef Gravitate. It retails for about $300 or so. Naturally, people will think this is biased due to my affiliation with the company, but while testing the prototypes of these rods, I beat the hell out of them and really put them through their paces. I can sleep well at night recommending them to anyone. That being said, they have their limitations. In particular, if you plan on fishing heavy jigs in deep water (eg 400g+ jigs in 400ft or deeper), I wouldn't recommend them. But, anything up to that point they are great.

To compare to Temple Reef's flagship, the Levitate, the Gravitate are slightly thinner blanks, slightly more parabolic, and use alconite vs Sic guides (although the same layout). They both use Toray carbon. The Levitate is very very capable of working heavy jigs in deep water while still maintaining just a beautiful action. Objectively, they're the best I've fished.

I've fished the Phenix and while the build quality was great, it was a bit stiff and a little too fast. I think they would shine in deeper water with heavier jigs.

Comparable rods in your price point are Sea Falcon rods, which have a better components than the Gravitate (I think they use titanium guides) but the butt end is a little shorter, and the rod is a bit less elastic than the Gravitate. It's also 6'6 vs. 6'8 as in the Levitate Gravitate, and it is a noticeable difference.

There is a relatively new company called Takamitechnos (I know, a mouthful) that makes a series called MOZ which I've seen land very large fish, but it's one of the few brands I haven't personally fished.

Objectively, knowing what I know now, I would buy the Gravitate and pair it with a black Accurate Valiant 500n for a murdered out, and very capable set up at your price point. I know these rods would handle the yellowtail but I cannot speak to the bluefin. A buddy of mine who I fish with regularly believes they would be able to handle bluefin of that size, and I trust his opinion. But, I cannot personally definitively say that they would work there. Just being honest.
Which Gravitate rod are you referring to? G1, G2, or G3? Or does it simply depend on the depth and weight of the jig?

The depth I would be fishing would be 300 feet max, and the jig, probably 300 grams max. G1?