self fishing processing

Discussion in 'Fishing Chit Chat' started by freespool9, Nov 22, 2018.

  1. freespool9

    freespool9 Newbie

    Name:
    Kendall
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    i apologize if this has already been posted but my search of this forum showed nothing that answered my own questions. i'm speaking for the perspective of an enthusiast and feel processing (for now) is part of the fishing experience. what are some best practices for self fish processing BFT & YFT? or perhaps somebody can share what they do differently or the science behind some of this.

    been processing my own catches the last year and have a few questions about the general process:
    * filet & de-skin and remove blood-lines; each cut is half-pound to full-pound for serving portions
    * wrap in a paper towel for 48 hours and put in the refrigerator
    * dispose paper towel wrappers, vacuum seal, then store packs in regular fridge that will get consumed, otherwise will be in freezer

    1) i noticed within 24 hrs of vacuum sealing, the tuna loins will start to brown. from everything i read this is normal and presumably from just the remaining blood content in the meat. is there a way to prevent this browning? its only because when giving away to friends/family i often feel necessary to explain to them the presentation of the browning.

    2) somebody on a boat once told me they stick their cuts into the freezer for a few hours prior to vacuum sealing. any benefit to this or does anybody else practice this?

    3) how do super markets look to prevent browning? packaged cuts are not even vacuum sealed and they often look less brown (like costco YFT) i know it is common for them to inject gases with YFT but that often gives an obvious artificial pink color in most places
     
  2. SouthBayKiller

    SouthBayKiller I've posted enough I should edit this section

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    “Why does Conventionally Frozen Tuna often appear so bright red in color?”

    Freezing tuna in the conventional manner is NOT COLD ENOUGH to halt microbiological activity. In fact, tuna will continue to turn brown during the conventional freezing process, and the rate at which it turns brown will rapidly increase upon defrosting.

    To counter this, many tuna and beef suppliers use a smoke treatment process that prevents oxidation and brightens the color of the meat. Smoke treatment, which is also called tasteless smoke, carbon monoxide(CO) treatment or gas treatment, causes the tuna – or any red meat – to take and retain a bright watermelon red color, even long past when the product is edible. For consumer protection, Canada, the countries of Europe, Japan, and China have banned this process outright. It is still legal in the US.
     
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  3. mullet

    mullet Metal Fabricator

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    Your aging it in paper towels for 2 days is not helping your cause. Two things that start to stink after 3 days are fish and visiting in laws.
    If your using a foodsaver and need to dry it to seal it just try a quick wipe down .
     
    Last edited: Nov 22, 2018
  4. RideHPD

    RideHPD Enthusiastic Idiot Rookie

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    Before I start filleting I dump a bag or two of ice into a marine cooler, then top with trash bags, then paper towels to segregate from freshwater and keep dry. Fish goes straight out of the kill bag, onto the table, and each fillet goes right into the cooler as soon as it comes off the carcass. Let the fillets cool back down a bit before taking out to skin and portion. Portions into a smaller cooler with ice, bags, paper towels. Portions get patted completely dry with paper towels, vac bagged, and into the fridge bottomed out cold at 34F. Constantly wiping down cutting utensils, surfaces, and hands; hygiene goes a long way to peserving it. If you're going to freeze it helps to let them come back down to 34F to minimize the temp gradient from the surface to interior upon freezing.

    It's a lot of work but I'm still pulling vac sealed bluefin from a week and a half ago out of the fridge for sashimi and poke that was never frozen and just as good as it was on day 1, if not better from the aging.
     
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  5. plj46

    plj46 I've posted enough I should edit this section

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    Like somebody else said,two days in a paper towel in the fridge might be the problem.My home vacuum sealed fish looks like it did when i filleted it.Fillet,put back on ice.Clean up mess then vacuum seal.The fish is kept cold the whole time.
     
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  6. Reel hip

    Reel hip Meet my "Well known Member"

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    I never let fresh water touch the fish until I'm ready to cook it.
    I also freeze it
     
  7. stank

    stank Well-Known "Member"

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    1. Have some place to dispose rid of the carcasses before you bring the fish home.
     
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  8. skipjackrobert

    skipjackrobert I've posted enough I should edit this section

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    Screw that! Take it to Mario’s or 5 Star! Done!
     
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  9. e_rack

    e_rack Member

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  10. jer dog

    jer dog Fishing is life

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  11. butcherboy

    butcherboy Retired Bum

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    tom cunningham
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    The biggest enemies that you have some control over are temperature, time, and exposure to oxygen. More cold = more better product. I'd suggest always having more ice than you think you'll need. On the ride back in or in the channel separate fillets from carcass ...leave skin on as added protection, then back on ice in ziplocks while trying to squeeze out extra air. This works best when some thought is put into some sort of "fish cleaning station" on your boat. You can fine tune your fillet cleaning at home just before freezing. Try to keep in mind the "clock is running" the minute the fish come out of the water till properly frozen...only the cold can slow down the clock! Tom.
     

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