Scrubs epic RRIII adventures (part 3 of 5)

Discussion in 'San Diego Long Range fishing Reports' started by StillinScrubs, Nov 15, 2005.

  1. StillinScrubs

    StillinScrubs Wahoo love me

    Location:
    Ft. Lauderdale/Miami
    Name:
    Scott
    Boat:
    Charon's skiff
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      (956)
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    The line peeled off the reel. This fish was mad and going to take me for all I had left. Up to the bow we went down to the stern where I hoped to stay. I began the dance with the TLD fish that was still on. After 5 minutes of wrapping and unwrapping on the stern my fish again headed for the bow. Luckily for me there was now only one other fisherman up there. I began to put the wood to the fish and deep color was noted. The fish decied to change tactics. Instead of an up and down fight this fish went out and began circling from the surface to down deep. Added to this mess was the fact that I nwo had a fish on either side of me. It was too much Joe the deck hand grabbed the rod and began weaving the fish between the rods to either side of me, all the while winching the fish closer to the boat. The fish would surface almost appearing to gasp at the air and then dive as it neared the boat and the waiting gaffs. As the fish got desperately close the rod was handed back to me and I was told to give him all I had left. As the fish dove for what seemed like the hundredth time a gaff found its mark then a second.

    The victory march being my first with a large tuna was not one of ease. My mind raced with concerns, "Could this fish get away?" "Could it still be lost?" I was in agony. A third gaff at the stern and up it came. Almost over the rail and it hung there for a second looking like it might tip back into the sea. Then with one last lunge the crew brought the fish to the deck with a mighty thud.

    I was estatic, drained, but triumphant. I was now 1/4 and so happy to be over the hump. The fished taped out at ~205lbs. Could this be my first cow!!!! I was in shock.

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    After the first pic. I thought of the post i had read the week before my trip about the fellow who had lost so many fish finally to be rewarded. It inspired this picture.

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    The night was over. All the while this bite was occuring the boat had been privy to a display by mother nature few men will ever see. Cow tuna had turned the surface of the water to foam. Roving packs attacked the small bait balls released by the crew. Multiple cows were seen exploding completely free of thier watery homes in frenzied pursuit of 5 inch morsals. As the first then second cow would miss a sardine the third would cut a tight semi circle on the surface and engulf the baitfish. The group responded with load cheering with each surface display. We were in awe.

    After the 27th large tuna had hit the decks that evening the run back to Magdelena was made for more bait to keep the tanks stocked.

    Day 5 - The skiff

    Running back in the grey light of morning again a school of large tuna was found. Just like the day before this bite started with a slow pick. Again bucky was on the forfront of this bite slugging away at the cows. The wind had all but died today, too little for kites, but ballons were tried all morning by the few anglers who had not landed big fish the evening prior.

    These poor fellows cooked in the sun waiting for the bite that never materialized for the ballons. Huge fish were boiling behind the boat almost continually. Occasionally porposing out of the water after a trio of sardines thrown out to keep them close. I even cast the 90J skipping a catchy 33 arcoss the surface hoping to ellicit a bite, but is was no use. By noon eveyone had given up on the ballons.

    I was agin down to fishing 100# line on the 50 avet with a 5/0 hook this time. Around 12:30 I asked captain Andy if I could try a ballon. A light breeze had begun but this time was pushing out over the stern and not the bow. Thios meant ballons might take the baits closer to where the fish had been boiling all morning. One angler had a two ballon setup out before me and was some 100 yards out form the boat in great position. I grabbed my 100# rig in hindsight a poor decision, but it was what was closest to hand. I put on a sardine and worked it out to about 100 feet off the stern. Another angler also worked his ballon bait out next to mine. Not more than 40 feet away.

    As I watched my bait would occasionally be pulled towards the surface but the behing the head hook placement would cause it to fight the ballon and try to stay around 6" below the surface. As I watched the bait made a frenzied run arcoss the surface pulling the ballon with. I knew what was coming. IN the next second a cow tuna breached the surface completely clearing the water. In unison a chorus of voices screamed WIND!!!! As if willing me to get the slack out. The large fish had missed in its first attempt at the sardine and wheeled around again coming 2/3 of the way out of the water, where it now firmly grasp the sardine and dove directly towards the boat.

    The line came taught and screamed off the reel. At this point I fear a cut off on the boat and slammed the drag to full. Miraculously this stopped the fish and I backed the drag off to strike. The first 40 minutes of the fight was at the stern from one corned to the other.

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    I applied steady pressure to the fish. I would gain 10 feet of liune and proptly lose 20. After 40 minutes the fish took a searing run. I was in awe. It peeled line of the reel like the fight had just begun. And then headed to the bow. For another 20-30 minutes I gave this fish the wood. I would grab the spool and sit down in the harness giving all I could to lift the bastard from the depths. It wasn't happening. Since I had moved ot the bow Spike #2 on the boat had been with me coaching me along. I was in no hurry and not concerned, but clearly this fish was not coming any closer to the boat. At one point Spike commented, I just saw your fish. I looked but saw nothing. Spike shot back "I only saw the back this fish is still swiming upright."

    Out of the blue spike commented. I think this fish isn't going to come in this way, we need the skiff. It was my nievety and ignorance that replied back "great!" LIttle did I know what was in store. The boat was abuzz with the decision to launch the skiff. I handed the rod to Joe and ran below for my stash of gatorade and met Spike at the skiff. We loaded and proceded forward to the bow for the rod. Once I had the rod in hand Spike motored the skiff away from the boat and then cut the motor.

    It was here I learned two things. One this fish had immense power and two the skiff is hell. The skiffs are not firm platforms but are more flexible and flimsy. The fight goes from one of the legs and upper arms to the back and fore arms. At first I fought the fish with the rod off the bow of the skiff. All of the fishes power was placed squarely on my forearms. I knew I could not sustain this and Spike could see it too. HE helped me work the rod into a starboard position that placed the rod up higher and gave my legs some leverage. He also helped my place the kidney belt for some addtional support. All the while the bastard below us pull the skiff farther away from the RR.

    On two occasions Spike tried in vain to gain line by running the boat forward to catch up on the slack. It was of little to no use as the fish was several hundred yards directly below us but still towing us away from the rooster. Every few minutes I would put the stick to the fish and try to winch it closer to the boat. Each time I would gain 5 feet and then lose 10 as the fish told me who was in charge. The line was so tight it sung as it sliced through the water.

    Spike explained to me he had been in the skiff for 5.5 hours before down on the islands fighting one single fish. It was now approaching two and the prospect of three more hours in the skiff fighting this fish honestly scared me. This was more like torture the only thing that kept me in the fight was my desire to kill this fish. BY back and forearms were on fire. I was cooking in the sun and short of breath. Each time my mind would try to get me to quit, my desire to kill the fish would take over.

    After numerous attempts to lift the fish only to lose more line, spike got invloved. He would grab the line with both hands pinning it against the rod's grip. I would use my thumb to do the same or grab the spool with one hand and we would lift the rod with all we had. Spike would warn me before he let go so that I could wind like hell the few cranks I would get on low speed before we would have to lift again. Slowly miraculously the fish began to get closer to the boat. Mind you it was still swimming in one direction, away from the rooster.

    Ten minutes into this Spike said "I've got color" We inched the fish closer and closer. Spike commented as the fist was within 50 feet "We still havn't turned this fish's head" And we hadn't we had merely lifted the whole fish slowly to the boat. The fish had just kept swimming all the while. Slowly the beats began to swim in circles but the were not circles of defeat as the fish was never totally on its side. These circles were attempts by the fish to get a better angle of battle against us. Each inch was being earned the hard way. And did I feel it. Finally the fish was with in 10 feet. Spike switched from fish fighting mode to fish gaffing mode. This left me and the fish against one another again. Spkie would cheer me on with "Scott lift that fish" and "Give it all you've got now" Finally the gaff was sunk.

    A clean belly shot the first went crazy for a moment and then settled down. Relief or so I thought. Spike asked for the tail rope and I handed himt the wrong one, then the correct one. The tail rope was on just as the belly gaff pulled. Again the fish was going crazy as I held on to the tail rope. Spiked growled let go, but I couldn't. I had no idea why he wanted me to let go. I finally did and he sunk another belly gaff home. This one held long enough for the gill rope to be placed. The fist was ours, but still wasn't giving up. The fish again went crazy rocking the little skiff back and forth.

    At the point I look up to see us far from the RR. Later the others guessed I was ~0.5 miles away. It felt farther in that little boat, but I won't argue. Not wanting my fellow fishing mates to wonder our fate, I let our a clean rebel yell that several commented that they heard. I was spent but happy. I thought the fish would be gone on many occasions, but with Spikes guidance I had killed this fish. The ride back to the rooster was pure joy.

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    A four gaffer through the gate. My first!!!!

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    On deck this fish taped out at 240lbs.

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    This fish later weighed 253.5 lbs back at the dock. My new personal best!!

    Myself and Spike, without whose help I never would have caught this fish.

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    I was exausted and now 2/5, the boat had added 21 more monsters to the holds a good day. It took all I had that night to get up and make bait. But what the next day had in store would blow me away.......
     
  2. Mstonefish

    Mstonefish Captain

    Location:
    Escondido
    Name:
    Mark
    Boat:
    22' Bayrunner CC 140 Suzuki 4 stroke
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    Epic read Scrubs, Awesome pics!:beerbang:
     
  3. SALTYDAWG

    SALTYDAWG Advertiser Advertiser

    Location:
    Casa DE Oro
    Name:
    Bill
    Boat:
    sold it
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    Great read, Awesome fish
     
  4. tunachris

    tunachris Member

    Location:
    Azusa, CA
    Name:
    Chris Lomax
    Boat:
    none
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    Good job, epic!!!! But, DID YOU EAT the HEART!!!!!!!
     
  5. WIDEOPENBITE

    WIDEOPENBITE A SALT WEAPON

    Location:
    Gulf Breeze, FLA
    Name:
    Jeff
    Boat:
    Yours
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      (985)
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      (1)
    Great post. (I still miss your prior Avatar)
     
  6. Reel_Brew

    Reel_Brew Member

    Location:
    Santa Clarita
    Name:
    Joe
    Boat:
    Grady White 228
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      (749)
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      (48)
    AWESOME Scrubs! I ache all over just from your read. Nice very nice. :cheers:
     
  7. skippajack

    skippajack Newbie

    Location:
    kauai,hi
    Name:
    Skip Boranian
    Boat:
    17ft whaler with cab
    • Messages:
      (671)
    • Likes Received:
      (1)
    AWSOME!!!! thanks for reports.
     
  8. MORGS

    MORGS Well-Known "Member"

    Location:
    Montrose
    Name:
    Morgan
    Boat:
    Boatless
    • Messages:
      (1,639)
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    Great Read thanks.
     
  9. Neill

    Neill Member

    Location:
    Tidewater Oregon
    Name:
    Neill
    Boat:
    18ft inboard aluminum....
    • Messages:
      (1,357)
    • Likes Received:
      (1)
    Great read Scrubs, can't wait for the next installment...:)
     
  10. Alter Ego

    Alter Ego Intrepid 12/07...273# yft

    Location:
    San Diego
    Name:
    Brent
    Boat:
    long range
    • Messages:
      (924)
    • Likes Received:
      (6)
    Excellent read, dude. It felt like I was there the whole time. Nice cow!
     

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