Santa brought it, so I experimented on wife's engagement ring.

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locvetter

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    I have been through a bit of the learning curve on welding rings. Am very happy with the strength of the little rings I silver soldered onto some new 5/0 Hybrid Mutu's. The flux residue and bit of char, well, not elegant.

    Santa brought an ultrasonic cleaner. Ooh. But was it safe? So I tried it on my loving wife's decades old engagement ring. Worked very nicely. Tried it on my wedding band. Seems safe. My watch: Good.

    Pre Ultrasound:
    PreUltrasound.JPG


    Post:
    Post ultrsound.JPG


    Sharpness not detectably changed - these are very sharp. Much cleaner looking now. Good to go. Merry Merry to me.
     
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    Cubeye

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    I used my ultrasonic cleaner to clean the wire feed cable for my MIG welder. I used Simple Green, removed the flux core wire and put the cable in the solution. I guess I left it in the machine too long, because it removed the protective plating and now it's all rusty.

    Don't leave it in for too long. Bad things can happen.

    The machine works well to clean reel parts if you're into that kind of stuff.
     
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    yakdout

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    wife's old engagement ring? Loc, you are one brave motherfucker :D I know, it's all about the science...never the less, hero status on this one...
    I don’t think he meant he was soldering on the wedding rings. Sounds like he just tested the ultrasonic cleaner with them, which is really what ultrasonic cleaners were made for.

    Now if I’m wrong and he did solder the wedding ring, that took balls
     
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    stank

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    I used my ultrasonic cleaner to clean the wire feed cable for my MIG welder. I used Simple Green, removed the flux core wire and put the cable in the solution. I guess I left it in the machine too long, because it removed the protective plating and now it's all rusty.

    Don't leave it in for too long. Bad things can happen.

    The machine works well to clean reel parts if you're into that kind of stuff.

    Does the “cable” for your MIG welder not have a nylon liner inside?
     
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    locvetter

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    I don’t think he meant he was soldering on the wedding rings. Sounds like he just tested the ultrasonic cleaner with them, which is really what ultrasonic cleaners were made for.

    Now if I’m wrong and he did solder the wedding ring, that took balls
    Correct: Amy was in the room, supervising. I just cleaned her ring for her. My idiocy does not reach so high as to allow me to heat her rocks?
     
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    Cubeye

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    Does the “cable” for your MIG welder not have a nylon liner inside?
    I haven't noticed. It clogs up when I use the flux coated wire. I don't use gas because I use it outside and any sort of breeze will negate the gas. I tried to clean the inside of the cable with my ultrasonic cleaner, but it didn't work. I just bought a new cable. It's a Lincoln MIG.
     
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    stank

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    I haven't noticed. It clogs up when I use the flux coated wire. I don't use gas because I use it outside and any sort of breeze will negate the gas. I tried to clean the inside of the cable with my ultrasonic cleaner, but it didn't work. I just bought a new cable. It's a Lincoln MIG.

    It should have a replaceable liner that pulls out from the feeder end.
     
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    Cubeye

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    It should have a replaceable liner that pulls out from the feeder end.
    Yes. The Steel Liner can be pulled out of the Power Cable. The Steel Liner is what I replaced. Sorry for not calling out the parts with their proper names. It's been working well since I replaced it, but then again, I don't use it as much as I used to. But the flux on the wire does tend to flack off and clog up the Liner, then the feed slows down or becomes erratic
     
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    Bottom Line

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    Yes. The Steel Liner can be pulled out of the Power Cable. The Steel Liner is what I replaced. Sorry for not calling out the parts with their proper names. It's been working well since I replaced it, but then again, I don't use it as much as I used to. But the flux on the wire does tend to flack off and clog up the Liner, then the feed slows down or becomes erratic

    The wired should be flux-cored and not external flux. I've been running my Lincoln for many, many years and never had it jam in the liner. My MIG machine is another story as the liner needs replacing every couple years if used consistently.
     
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    Cubeye

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    The wired should be flux-cored and not external flux. I've been running my Lincoln for many, many years and never had it jam in the liner. My MIG machine is another story as the liner needs replacing every couple years if used consistently.
    Yes. It's internal, but there's a coating on the wire that flakes off. That's what clogs up liner. Haven't had a problem since then. Maybe there was a burr in the liner that caused the problem?
     
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    locvetter

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    loc- look out for sharp spots, sharp points on your welds. also might want to refine the flame level (heat) on your torch head.
    just friendly suggestions
    Thanks. Would welcome your comments on: I am using a #4 tip on my Smith torch. I try and adjust it so there is just the two blues, no yellow and none of the lighter blue/yellow that happens when I put on a bit too much O2. I try and hold the flame so that the tip of the blue inner cone is at the weld point. It seems that if I wait too long the ring gets too hot and I get no flow, so I wait until the black flux I use sort of melts and looks dry, which is about the time the ring just starts to get earliest red. Then I touch it with my 1/32 or sometime 3/64th rod. With the thinner stuff I feed in a little bit, with the thicker I come away as soon as it melts.

    With bronze, it is the same but with dry flux and takes more heat. Any suggestions welcome.

    (Interesting how these threads evolve. this one started on the topic of ultrasound cleaning, and now is admixed maintaining a mig welder and this tangent on how to weld rings correctly. Typical BD!)
     
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    locvetter

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    The only problems I ever have with silver soldering are:

    1. Overheating the work
    2. Contaminated work or filler
    3. Poorly fitted work
    What a pain it can be to get the ends of the rings touching. When I have tested some I have silver soldered with a tiny but visible gap, they are strong, and when I grind then polish the joint it looks to be filled. When you say poorly fitted - how perfect need the fit be. Some rings, particularly Roscos, are cut so as to preclude a real butt joint - unless one files/grinds the ends flat.
     
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    ripped

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    Depending on the diameter of your wire these may be helpful Loc. Up to 16 gauge they won't put kinks in the wire and will work with small diameter rings. For heavier stock and larger diameter look for Lingual bar bending pliers.

    Amazon product
     
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    locvetter

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    Depending on the diameter of your wire these may be helpful Loc. Up to 16 gauge they won't put kinks in the wire and will work with small diameter rings. For heavier stock and larger diameter look for Lingual bar bending pliers.

    Amazon product
    Thank you. They are on the way. It is the case that the right tool can make a huge difference.
     
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    Cubeye

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    What a pain it can be to get the ends of the rings touching. When I have tested some I have silver soldered with a tiny but visible gap, they are strong, and when I grind then polish the joint it looks to be filled. When you say poorly fitted - how perfect need the fit be. Some rings, particularly Roscos, are cut so as to preclude a real butt joint - unless one files/grinds the ends flat.
    I wouldn't worry about the Rosco rings. They are cut with a slight scarf, which allows more surface area for the braze material to make contact with, which makes a stronger join. A butt joint is usually saw cut and is much smoother and has less contact material at the join. The braze material that you are using has more than enough tensile strength for your application. It's probably close to 60,000 psi.

    The main purpose of the flux is to clean the material so that the braze will adhere. If you apply too much flux, you won't be able to see where the joint is until you burn off the excess flux, and by that time you may have overheated the material.

    Use the smallest diameter brazing material that they make. It think it's 1/32" for silver. That's the easiest to use. If you only have 1/16", take a hammer and smash it to make it thinner, and use that. If you use anything bigger, you will probably apply too much material onto the ring.

    As for the flame adjustment, you want a 'neutral' flame'. A slightly reducing or carburizing flame will work, but won't be as hot. A oxidizing flame will tend to 'burn' the material.

    PS.......back on track. No more MIG welders.
     
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    locvetter

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    I wouldn't worry about the Rosco rings. They are cut with a slight scarf, which allows more surface area for the braze material to make contact with, which makes a stronger join. A butt joint is usually saw cut and is much smoother and has less contact material at the join. The braze material that you are using has more than enough tensile strength for your application. It's probably close to 60,000 psi.

    The main purpose of the flux is to clean the material so that the braze will adhere. If you apply too much flux, you won't be able to see where the joint is until you burn off the excess flux, and by that time you may have overheated the material.

    Use the smallest diameter brazing material that they make. It think it's 1/32" for silver. That's the easiest to use. If you only have 1/16", take a hammer and smash it to make it thinner, and use that. If you use anything bigger, you will probably apply too much material onto the ring.

    As for the flame adjustment, you want a 'neutral' flame'. A slightly reducing or carburizing flame will work, but won't be as hot. A oxidizing flame will tend to 'burn' the material.

    PS.......back on track. No more MIG welders.
    Great stuff. Thank you!
     
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    shellback

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    Thanks. Would welcome your comments on: I am using a #4 tip on my Smith torch. I try and adjust it so there is just the two blues, no yellow and none of the lighter blue/yellow that happens when I put on a bit too much O2. I try and hold the flame so that the tip of the blue inner cone is at the weld point. It seems that if I wait too long the ring gets too hot and I get no flow, so I wait until the black flux I use sort of melts and looks dry, which is about the time the ring just starts to get earliest red. Then I touch it with my 1/32 or sometime 3/64th rod. With the thinner stuff I feed in a little bit, with the thicker I come away as soon as it melts.

    With bronze, it is the same but with dry flux and takes more heat. Any suggestions welcome.

    (Interesting how these threads evolve. this one started on the topic of ultrasound cleaning, and now is admixed maintaining a mig welder and this tangent on how to weld rings correctly. Typical BD!)
     
    Upvote 0