Rod Rating -- How Is It Decided?

Discussion in 'Shimano Fishing Gear' started by surfgoose, Oct 23, 2017.

  1. surfgoose

    surfgoose active geezer

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    I have a bunch of rods from a lot of different makers, I am not a brand fanatic. When I need a new rod to match with a new reel for a particular purpose, I try to find a match that works well for me physically because I'm tall with long arms.

    Usually the rods are rated for a range that is easy to understand, like "15 to 40" or "20 to 50" and it is pretty easy to understand how it will work, along with the ratings like "Medium" and "Heavy" and even "Extra Heavy." In the past, the rod that I bought with the widest range was an all-roller Kencor rated "40-100" that I use for trolling or dropping heavy lures for big tuna.

    But I have noticed that my new Shimano rod to match with my heavy Spheros 20000 spinner, a Terez TZS722XH, is rated "65-200" which is an insanely wide range. I'm using 80 lb. braid on the Spheros and wanted a very strong rod that I could fight big tuna with, and am confident that it will be equal to the task. But can anyone explain the reasoning behind a range of "65 -200" in a spinning rod?
     
  2. mindbent

    mindbent Member

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    Don't quote me on this but I believe it depends on the guides.
     
  3. surfgoose

    surfgoose active geezer

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    OK, Jon, I won't quote you. I think that you were kidding, anyway. I know that it is the materials in the blank that determine both the action and the rating. I'm hoping that Bantam 1 the Shimano rep will find out the reason for the incredible range that the factory rated this rod. I know that Daiwa has a spinning rod with the same rating, I don't know how they arrived at that figure either. But at least Shimano cares enough to set up a forum so that questions can be addressed.
     
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  4. Let em eat 74

    Let em eat 74 Well-Known "Member"

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    Maybe they throw darts? Honestly I couldn't agree more, the ratings on Shimano rods are goofy.
     
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  5. hucklongfin

    hucklongfin Deep release specialist

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    They rate them for the spectra backing rather than the topshot/leader.
     
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  6. fishkilr

    fishkilr on the water

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    There is no rod that I would fish with 20 lb that I would also fish on 50 lb..
    Rod ratings are something I've never gone by and have always trusted my feel instinct ..
     
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  7. af dreamer

    af dreamer I've posted enough I should edit this section

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    I have seen some rods that show a braid rating and a mono rating at the same time.Something like 40-80 braid and 15-30 mono!WTF?Tom
     
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  8. Calvin Deshler

    Calvin Deshler I like to touch Fish

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    I have always been told that you add both numbers then divide by 2, which leaves the ideal line size. such as a 30-80lb rod (110) would be either a 50 or a 60lb rod. though it seems unlikely that your rod is made for 130lb.
     
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  9. mackereljoe

    mackereljoe Member

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    I wish they just state at what # it bottom out or lifting power. Got a teramar 90MH and it seems to bottom out at 7-8 pounds of drag although rated 30-65 braid.
     
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  10. surfgoose

    surfgoose active geezer

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    I'm still waiting for some kind of answer from Bantam 1 of Shimano, or perhaps from someone who builds rods. How is the rated power of a rod decided? And Tom brings up a good point -- why would a rod have a different rating for mono versus braid? I looked, and I too have several rods that have dual -and different- ratings.
     
  11. hucklongfin

    hucklongfin Deep release specialist

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    Why a difference between mono and spectra ratings? With spectra there’s no stretch so you need the rod to act as a shock absorber as well as lift. Mono stretches so the rod can just provide lift.
     
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  12. surfgoose

    surfgoose active geezer

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    MarkT -- Well, I'm 71 and the old brain cells don't fire as fast as they used to, but if what you said is true then wouldn't the spectra ratings be lower than the mono? Wouldn't the stretch of the mono be more forgiving of shocks to the rod, and thus enable the rod to fish higher test line? All of the rods that I have seen have a much higher rating with braid, and that makes no sense to me. But then, I don't understand the "advantage" of acid-wrapping a rod either.
     
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  13. mindbent

    mindbent Member

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    Have you tried the rod building forum?
     
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  14. surfgoose

    surfgoose active geezer

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    Jon -- No, I was wondering at the reasoning behind the mind-spinning range given by Shimano to the rod that I bought. Thus the Shimano forum. I understand the basic concept behind the materials chosen, and thicknesses, in relating to the use intended. But it is very rare for rod ratings to be more than forty or fifty pounds apart, and for my Shimano to be officially rated by them at "65-200" which is a whole 135 pound spread is making my head spin. How did they ever come up with that figure?

    The rod building forum hasn't discussed a range like that, as far back as I could search. Or if they did, I missed it. Those guys talk in circles, anyway. Almost everyone agrees that a rod blank has a spine, and it makes a difference to the action on which side of the spine you wrap the guides -- unless of course you "acid-wrap" in a circle. . . .Huh?
     
  15. mindbent

    mindbent Member

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    That is weird. I've also never seen a rod rated for 65#. Usually 25-60 or 60-100.
     
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  16. Bantam1

    Bantam1 Shimano Rep Advertiser

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    The braided line ratings carry over from the jigging type rods. The leader strength is not relevant when jigging because you may be using a heavy leader for abrasion resistance or against toothy fish.

    The Terez rods were made for braided line with short top shots. This is why they have a braided line only rating. Typically you can divide the braided line rating in half for your leader ratings, but its not always the case. With the rods rated for 65-200 I would suggest 65-100 pound Power Pro with 40-60 pound leaders. You can go up to 80 if needed.
     
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  17. jiggyn

    jiggyn Do you even fish?

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    And than a 40lb rod is probably a 30lb with another manufacturer

    Go figure
     
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  18. Bantam1

    Bantam1 Shimano Rep Advertiser

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    Shimano Japan is started to use lifting power for ratings for the heavier offshore type rods. It is an interesting concept, but most anglers do not understand drag. It would be difficult to start using that method to rate rods.
     
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  19. diabolicaldog

    diabolicaldog Member

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    I had an old (2002) Daiwa vertical jig rod that was rated 6-8pe but also had "max drag 15kg" on the rod. I always thought it was useful information that more manufacturers should adopt as a guide.
     
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2017
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