Remember albacore?

Discussion in 'San Diego Long Range fishing Reports' started by Klamath17, Aug 12, 2016.

Tags:
  1. Klamath17

    Klamath17 Member

    Location:
    Inland Empire
    Name:
    Steve
    Boat:
    Anything that floats
    • Messages:
      (126)
    • Likes Received:
      (60)
    Every season I watch the albacore counts up north, just to see what's going on. Maybe one day they'll be back in SoCal, like the good old days.

    This commercial site has some good current catch information:

    http://pacificalbacore.com/wfoa/fish-reports/

    But why have they been mostly absent from the California coast over the last few years? Nobody really knows for sure, but this 2013 article has some good information about albacore tagging and tracking results. The technology could be useful for other species too.

    http://www.fishermensnews.com/story...nia-where-have-all-the-albacore-gone/227.html
     
  2. Lake

    Lake I've posted enough I should edit this section

    Location:
    Visalia, CA
    Name:
    Blaine Lake
    Boat:
    none
    • Messages:
      (2,093)
    • Likes Received:
      (2,159)
    We lost them in the 80's for several years also. They came back strong. It's incredible how they just disappear.
     
  3. Brad I

    Brad I Common Sense Isn't Common Enough

    Location:
    San Fernando Valley
    Name:
    Brad I
    Boat:
    Nope
    • Messages:
      (1,577)
    • Likes Received:
      (1,571)
    In addition to tagging fish, we'd probably also get some useful information if we could tag the factory boats that consistently seem to catch the fish (one long time fisherman tells me that years ago when commercial boats stretching miles of nets at a critical Pacific migration bottleneck were removed, albacore made a re-appearance).
     
  4. makairaa

    makairaa I've posted enough I should edit this section

    Location:
    Tustin CA
    Name:
    Philip Hunkins
    Boat:
    17 starcraft
    • Messages:
      (4,063)
    • Likes Received:
      (3,021)
    Part of the reason they have been absent from norcal is the weather has been bad offshore for seemingly years. I remember when I was younger going to morro bay to fish them. You always had to watch the weather, but the boats made it out at least 5 or 6 days a week. The last 5 or 6 years the boats are lucky if the weather lets them go out more than 1 or 2 times a week. Hard to find the fish and stay on them if you cannot get out consistently.
     
  5. yo-mama

    yo-mama Member

    Name:
    ja
    Boat:
    magic
    • Messages:
      (230)
    • Likes Received:
      (70)
  6. NaplesJohn

    NaplesJohn Never Forget 343

    Location:
    Port Aransas, TX, USA
    Name:
    John
    Boat:
    Wilderness Systems T-160...and just sold the boat!!!
    • Messages:
      (643)
    • Likes Received:
      (580)
  7. Klamath17

    Klamath17 Member

    Location:
    Inland Empire
    Name:
    Steve
    Boat:
    Anything that floats
    • Messages:
      (126)
    • Likes Received:
      (60)
    Unlike many other species, the overall North Pacific albacore population appears to be in good shape:

    http://isc.fra.go.jp/recommendation/index.html

    Apparently the albacore go wherever they find food, upwelling, and temperatures to their liking. While passing through, fishermen have to find them, and there are less commercial boats looking (but same tonnage caught because they are more efficient now).

    When I was a kid, Southern California albacore runs were very predictable. Coastal upwelling was a given, anchovies were the usual bait, yellowfin were usually further south, the water was colder, and El Nino was nowhere around. Now we've got mostly yellowfin, sardines, warmer water, and no albacore. The yellowtail population seems fairly consistent.

    Maybe everything will reverse again - time will tell.
     
  8. wils

    wils lazy-ass well known "member"

    Location:
    not a spoiled bitch from san diego
    Name:
    bill
    Boat:
    I hate boats
    • Messages:
      (8,806)
    • Likes Received:
      (4,849)
    living albacores like cooler water and anchovies. YT and tunas like warnmer water and sardines. which of the above have you guys been having the past few years?

    dead albacores LOVE BBQs
     
  9. Steve K

    Steve K Hey, I'm gettin' bit...

    Location:
    Bishop
    Name:
    Steve
    Boat:
    18' Bayrunner, but I like the American Angler and the Red Rooster III
    • Messages:
      (10,881)
    • Likes Received:
      (5,950)
    Nice pic, I've been looking at it for about ten years. Used to adorn one of the walls in the salon on the American Angler. Reveals an interesting trolling technique with the use of a big egg sinker to get that Zuker feather a little deeper.
     
  10. chef tom

    chef tom Member

    Location:
    fresno ca. usa
    Name:
    tom waggoner
    Boat:
    none
    • Messages:
      (534)
    • Likes Received:
      (232)
    Albacore are extinct !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
     
  11. tunanorth

    tunanorth I've posted enough I should edit this section

    Location:
    By the lake
    Name:
    Tunanorth
    Boat:
    Bass Tracker 16
    • Messages:
      (5,328)
    • Likes Received:
      (2,842)



    One major difference, during the albacore drought of the late 80's, there were very few albacore to be found anywhere in the northern hemisphere. One theory was that monofilament drift nets had decimated the population. The worries were legitimate.
    However, right now there are plenty of albacore on the US west coast, just ask the fleet in Oregon and Washington, they are in a third straight year of excellent catches. They even get a few bluefin mixed in, along with some yellowtail under kelp paddies, and even the very occasional dorado or opah too.
     
  12. Klamath17

    Klamath17 Member

    Location:
    Inland Empire
    Name:
    Steve
    Boat:
    Anything that floats
    • Messages:
      (126)
    • Likes Received:
      (60)
    It looks like you (and Brad, above) may be right about this. A book titled "Status of Interactions of Pacific Tuna Fisheries in 1995" says on page 70 that "An industrial drift gillnet fishery for albacore has had a short life span. This fishery developed in the eastern Indian Ocean in 1985, moving into the western part of the ocean in 1987. The fishery stopped operating in 1992, following the global ban on the use of large-scale drift gillnets on the high seas. Peak catches, attained in 1990, were 21,142 mt, pushing the total catch of this species beyond estimates of maximum sustainable yield (Hsu and Chang, 1994)."

    Another book called "The California Current: A Pacific Ecosystem and Its Fliers, Divers, and Swimmers" has some interesting history of the Southern California commercial fishing industry from the early 1900's onward. Albacore populations waxed and waned over the years, but the commercial fishery was largely started with albacore and later led to bluefin and yellowfin fisheries. It's a very good book for understanding the California offshore ecosystem, currents, and fishing history.
     
  13. yo-mama

    yo-mama Member

    Name:
    ja
    Boat:
    magic
    • Messages:
      (230)
    • Likes Received:
      (70)
    :notworthy
    We did this for years back in the late 50s&60s when we had the Cico heads
     
  14. backlashjack

    backlashjack Scallywag

    Location:
    Alta Loma, CA
    Name:
    Jackson
    Boat:
    Sold the boat, now I just rent a stateroom on the EXCEL
    • Messages:
      (1,797)
    • Likes Received:
      (699)

Share This Page