Rebuilding a crummy 15 foot 70's tri hull for the NW Pacific

Discussion in 'Check Out My Boat Customization' started by Stomper, Dec 2, 2013.

  1. Stomper

    Stomper Clatu Verada Fishon

    Location:
    Humboldt Bay, Ca.
    Name:
    Robert Reed
    Boat:
    15 foot pilothouse trihull with radar and other electronics from hell
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    Some people showed some interest in this pilothouse project I did on a 500 dollar bomb of a boat.


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    This build thread ended with the boat looking like this. Since this was taken several months ago, I've added radar and some other small electronic additions.


    This was a generic cheap popout tri hull from 1977. I got it when a guy who owned it wanted my rusted out Bronco II for it's engine and transmission. I took the boat, he took the car. Now what to do with the boat. Maybe a litle inner tube towing at Trinity Lake or something. Someone said it would be laughable to think this could work up here in the PNW ocean environment and that's exactly what I was thinking in 2007. This thing sucks.

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    I started with this. Not likely this will ever see the ocean, especially the sometimes hazardous Humboldt Bay harbor entrance. Best used on a lake towing inner tubes.

    So I kept trying it out in the ocean and it impressed me every time. Long story short, over a period of 3 seasons I had enough confidence in it to tear it apart and rebuild it for more seasons in the ocean. By the time I decided to fix it up, I had landed something like 24 Pacific Halibut and a whole bunch of King Salmon on it's deck.


    The rebuild went for 3 winters but also fishing it each summer in between. First winter was the front deck fabrication, the second winter was completely gutting the boat for new transom, stringers and deck replacement. Third winter was fabrication of a pilothouse. Time to let the pictures do the talking.


    Winter 2010-2011 (3 years ago)


    Hinged bow deck addition


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    The bow deck is essentially a large hatch covering the open bow.


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    The deck can be opened easily at sea or on the trailer to retrieve items like bait from the cooler or fuel the tanks.


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    This shows the "slide off" marine grade hinges bought at a local marine supply.


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    From out in the North Pacific Ocean. Off in the distance 15 miles over the horizon looking over the bow deck cover is the Humboldt Bay harbor entrance, not visible due to the curvature of the earth's surface. You can barely see some hills on the horizon.
     
    Didley likes this.
  2. Stomper

    Stomper Clatu Verada Fishon

    Location:
    Humboldt Bay, Ca.
    Name:
    Robert Reed
    Boat:
    15 foot pilothouse trihull with radar and other electronics from hell
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    This tri hull is a 1977 Orrion 15 footer powered by a modified 1975 Chrysler 85. The boat is used 99 percent of the time in the Pacific Ocean out of Humboldt Bay. The ocean up here is notorious for unforgiving conditions but in the summer, it can be very nice. Much of the time I have to tolerate 7 to 8 foot seas with some wind chop, occasionally sending water over the bow on a little boat like this. It also can rain in the summer, and the open bow just collected water and drained into the cockpit. I wanted to be able to stand on the deck for fishing, launching and retreiving the boat at the ramp. I also wanted to be able to open it for full access to the contents of stored items in the bow compartment, and I wanted to be able to remove it quickly for open bow use if necessary. Stiffness was the key.


    I spec'd it for 18mm thick marine plywood fiberglassed on both sides for rigidity, air vented it for portable fuel tanks in the bow compartment, and slide off hinges. The 4X8 sheet of plywood was a little over 100 bucks. Marine grade ain't cheap. Nice wood though. After a summer in the Pacific Ocean this summer, I haven't regretted going with it one bit.


    With that said, pictures pretty much tell the story. The boat was 500 bucks, the original 85 Chrysler was replaced with a 40 hour old 85 that I happened to find in a guy's back yard who I know, for 75 bucks, all fresh water time in perfect shape. That engine now has 550 hours on it, all salt water Pacific Ocean time. I'm a full time professional marine diesel tech working for Cummins Pacific so the unlikely engine has been Frankenstien modified to be totally reliable and has done so for 6 years without as much as a misfire.


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    It all started with the open bow boat and a piece of plywood. The boat has the hand rails removed. Hand rails are required for passengers in the front. I am not going to carry passengers in the bow compartment, so off they came. Fuel tanks are strapped to the seat bases and plumbed for supply AND remote venting. Quick disconnects to the aft supply disconnect that normally connects to the stern tanks allow feeding off of rear or front tanks. The front tank vents are connected to one rear tank vent, so all 3 vent from the same vent on the port stern tank. On this boat, either engine can feed off of any tank. I can run 6 tanks for long runs of over 150 miles for tuna if I want to. I get about 30 miles per 6.5 gallon tank filled to 6 gallons.


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    The sheet was set up where I wanted it and cut to match the entry door and window opening.


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    Side view showing blocks holding the sheet in place.


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    Window closed, perfect fit along the bottom.
     
  3. Stomper

    Stomper Clatu Verada Fishon

    Location:
    Humboldt Bay, Ca.
    Name:
    Robert Reed
    Boat:
    15 foot pilothouse trihull with radar and other electronics from hell
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    [​IMG]
    Trim the front corners off to match the shape of the boat.


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    Add a strip of the same wood, cut it to shape, mount it and install the slide off hinges.


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    Cut the underside filler supports to fill the gap under the deck piece.


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    Side filler supports installed.


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    Upside down on the table for glassing. Polyester boat resin was used, bought at the local marine supply. The smell went away 2 days later. I like it, reminds me of my dad building surfboards in the garage in the fifties!


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    Vent placement, I ended up not using the handle. It's just as easy lifting from under the deck while at sea, and using the aft vent when standing on the ground.
     
  4. Stomper

    Stomper Clatu Verada Fishon

    Location:
    Humboldt Bay, Ca.
    Name:
    Robert Reed
    Boat:
    15 foot pilothouse trihull with radar and other electronics from hell
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    [​IMG]
    Glassing and sanding.


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    I used a layer of glass on top and bottom, don't remember but I think it was 6oz., and 2 coats of resin to get me through the summer without painting or putting something else over it. Like I said, I ain't a perfectionist, just wanted functionality and the wood looked kind of cool after the glass job so I left it for the summer proof of concept season. No signs of stress, cracks or wear of any sort after one season in the ocean.


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    Done for now, just have to cut the vent holes and install the vents.


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    Son Cameron after a very successful ocean salmon fishing adventure in the evil North Pacific!

    So on to the next winter's project, gutting the boat.
     
  5. Stomper

    Stomper Clatu Verada Fishon

    Location:
    Humboldt Bay, Ca.
    Name:
    Robert Reed
    Boat:
    15 foot pilothouse trihull with radar and other electronics from hell
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    Fast forward 1 year, to the winter of 2011-2012 (two years ago)

    A little TLC, as they always say in Craigslist.


    Had a little water getting into the transom and some stringer rotting in the 35 year old girl. I'm fishing it for another season. Replacing the transom, deck, stringers, fittings and just a general fixup.


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    Engine off, nice having a service truck with a crane.


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    Tuck the engine under a bench. Harbor freight dollies, about 18 bucks for this "engine stand". Instant.


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    A chainsaw awaits just in case I can't take it anymore.


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    Pull the cap.


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    The tell tale hole in the deck, the soft spot that ALWAYS means the stringers are rotted, transom is rotted, and the foam is waterlogged. In a post on the Humboldt Tuna forum I said the hole was from all the Pacific Halibut I had brought over that gunwale and NOBODY called me on it! :)
     
  6. Stomper

    Stomper Clatu Verada Fishon

    Location:
    Humboldt Bay, Ca.
    Name:
    Robert Reed
    Boat:
    15 foot pilothouse trihull with radar and other electronics from hell
    • Messages:
      (148)
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      (30)
    [​IMG]


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    All the foam is waterlogged, from years of the PO's leaving it out in the rain and letting it fill up. Yuk!


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    Those stringers were rotten to the core, no structural strength at all.

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    I hauled away about 300 pounds of waterlogged foam and about 200 pounds of waterlogged wood when it was all over.


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    Transom destruction. It had some strength left but was waterlogged enought that it had to go.


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    Closer to pulling the plug, chainsawing all of it and hauling the whole boat to the scrap heap and buying something turn key :)
     
  7. kodiak2858

    kodiak2858 Member

    Location:
    Marysville, WA
    Name:
    Roger Aulabaugh
    Boat:
    N/A
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    Even without seeing/following the entire thread....:appl::appl:
     
  8. gved823

    gved823 Member

    Location:
    Lakewood
    Name:
    Gary
    Boat:
    Sold
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    Good read, looking forward to the next steps
     
  9. Stomper

    Stomper Clatu Verada Fishon

    Location:
    Humboldt Bay, Ca.
    Name:
    Robert Reed
    Boat:
    15 foot pilothouse trihull with radar and other electronics from hell
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    Deck is out, removed a ton of waterlogged foam, stringers and deck supports, probably 500 lbs of dead weight. I can lift one corner of the boat with one hand now. It's now time to rebuild.


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    Yay, I got it gutted without putting a hole through the hull.


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    Amazing how lightened up it was.


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    Get out the cardboard, new transom time!


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    Hydrotek is great stuff. Google it. It's a mahogany type of wood. Very nice, many of the wood boater types who restore those beautiful runabouts at Lake Tahoe use it. Luckily one of the only suppliers on the west coast is about 2 miles from my house.

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    [​IMG]Edge view of the stuff.
     
  10. Stomper

    Stomper Clatu Verada Fishon

    Location:
    Humboldt Bay, Ca.
    Name:
    Robert Reed
    Boat:
    15 foot pilothouse trihull with radar and other electronics from hell
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    So I laminated two layers of 18mm ply together to form a 36mm thick transom. That's a little less than 1.5 inches thick. Some of the restore threads showed people using 3m 5200 to glue them together which is what I did. In hindsight, I think I might have resined them together with a single layer of 6oz cloth between them but it still worked just fine.


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    The 5200 oozing out.


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    Some resin and a layer of glass. All the more to make it water tight.


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    Yay, it still fits!


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    Can't remember what I was checking here, but I think it was to see if the transom skin would pull up to the transom wood.


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    I can't remember but it looks here like I was fitting a later of chopped strand mat to the transom before I laminated the wood to the skin.


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    The transom is now laminated to the skin, using polyester resin and glass in between. The clamps went through already existing holes in the skin.


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    Looking at these makes me feel good that I did it well. After some time passes you start forgetting. I've fished two 6 month seasons with this now.


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    After this set up, I started fitting a new deck in.
     
  11. gnehekul

    gnehekul I've posted enough I should edit this section

    Location:
    los angeles
    Name:
    Fishead
    Boat:
    cash carrying ho
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    Good read. Next steps pls :)
     
  12. Whalebreath

    Whalebreath Well-Known "Member"

    Location:
    Vancouver BC
    Name:
    Carl Z
    Boat:
    .
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    OK that answers my questions about the motor-Thanks

    and Thanks again for posting this-very cool!
     
  13. Stomper

    Stomper Clatu Verada Fishon

    Location:
    Humboldt Bay, Ca.
    Name:
    Robert Reed
    Boat:
    15 foot pilothouse trihull with radar and other electronics from hell
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    Yea, a Chrysler for god's sake. Hahaha. It's all just an experiment anyway. The engine mods are pretty simply standard mopar electronic ignition using an MSD Blaster II coil with some really hot plugs. If I wasn't able to make that mod (the old Chrysler CDI ignitions sucked I thought anyway), I would have 4 stroked this thing a long time ago. The experiment has gone so well though that I just keep running it for as long as I am willing to breath the deadly fumes.

    - - - Updated - - -

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    This picture always cracks me up. It shows the boat isn't square. After seeing this I did some measuring and sure enought the hull is 1 inch longer on the port side than on the starboard side. Most boats have assymetries like this somewhere. I fish about 50 percent of my fishing time on a very nice Davis Rock Harbor 25 and it has a similar discrepancy on a part of that boat. It's actually quite normal to find.


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    These little tri hulls are very easy to stringer, deck and re transom compared to some others. The small size and shape makes it a simple job.


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    At this point I dropped the hull cap back on for a fit check. I didn't jig the hull, I just left it on the trailer. This generally is not recommended since the hull loses it's shape after removing the cap, deck, stringers and transom. With this boat I really wasn't very concerned since it's small and I can force things together to a certain degree. Turns out it fit just fine.


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    Testing some paint at the same time. This was not what I would call a total restore. It is just fixing some problems and modifying some things along the way, in essence making a different boat out of it. The pilothouse was always in my mind even though I knew I wouldn't get to it during this particular winter.


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    Fabbing up some new lightweight stringers. Since the deck would support the transom forward force, I did not go all the way to the transom with the stringers much like the originals were. There ain't that much mass to this boat so it doesn't matter. It was going to be so much stronger than original anyway.


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    At this point I started using left over stuff I had to complete the deck. Those two pieces for the forward section were leftovers from the transom wood.


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    I decided to go light weight. I used a single layer of 6oz glass to cover the deck. Turned out to be a good deal because after 2 seasons of fishing it's still solid as heck.


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    Glassed and setting up.


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    In the boat, checking the fit.


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    This was probably a bad idea to put a center stringer here. It's a super stout stringer. I've checked it after two pounding seasons up here in the NW Pacific and no cracks have showed under the hull. It was bedded properly but I still wonder. I've heard that center stringers like this really aren't needed.


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    That deck wood is 18 mil thick with the rest of the main part of the deck at 15 mil. I left a 1/8 inch gap between the sections for water to drain into the bilge if necessary. It turned out to work really well, not that I get a lot of water in the boat.
     
  14. Stomper

    Stomper Clatu Verada Fishon

    Location:
    Humboldt Bay, Ca.
    Name:
    Robert Reed
    Boat:
    15 foot pilothouse trihull with radar and other electronics from hell
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    [​IMG]
    I placed the deck on two pylons so that I could lower it easily. I did all of this project with no help. So after applying the adhesive to the stringers and hull, I just pulled out the two pylons and lowered the deck to it's resting place.


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    I used countersunk SS screws through the deck into the stringers, with 5200 on the stringers. After I was done I used chopped strand mat tabs along the length of the deck on the sides and along the transom. No signs of give after 2 seasons. Considering the (probably) drugged out original constructor's use of 2x4's and nails, I think this will work pretty well.


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    You can see the shallow vee in the forward deck sections. All of the 3 sections are separated so that water can drain through the gaps and get back to the bilge pumps of which there are three in the stern.


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    Those pieces along the deck sides extend the deck outward and cover up the outer sponsons.


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    The drain gap


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    A little deck paint. Again, not an anal type of restor here. It's a rough duty fishing boat designed to get scratched up and have holes drilled in it, a boat not to worry about.


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    Some holes for water to drain into and others for hoses to pump the water out.


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    Sonar transducer pads down there, and new 15,000 pound SS eyes on the transom.


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    A little more paint. Nothing but the best cheap Rustoleum white deck paint. I was surprised at how rugged this stuff is. More than one person thought it was gel coat. I think I spent about 60 or 80 bucks at the most painting this thing.


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    More CSM glass tabbing to do. I glassed those side rail stringers which added 2 more stringers into the mix. The boat only had some cosmetic rails there to keep stuff in those cubby holes on the gunwales. Those things added a lot of strength and stiffness.


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    New steering. Oops, when I sea trialed this thing which was actually a successful fishing trip, I got to the ramp at 4:15 am to test everything without embarrasment. I hooked the steering up backwards, what a dope! Oh well, I fixed it in about 15 minutes under the dash by reversing the cable wrap.


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    Lowering the cap.
     
  15. Stomper

    Stomper Clatu Verada Fishon

    Location:
    Humboldt Bay, Ca.
    Name:
    Robert Reed
    Boat:
    15 foot pilothouse trihull with radar and other electronics from hell
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    [​IMG]
    Continuing lowering of the hull cap. It fit pretty well considering the hull didn't get jigged.


    So while we are at it, I've had this theory about manufacturing in the seventies. It doesn't take a scholar to imagine what the mind set of people were who manufactured things. I was there. I was a tech rep for an aviation gas turbine engine manufacturer. Some of the engineers at the time responsible for designing the innards of gas turbine helicopter engines were young party animals doing things to their brains that could be considered not so good for you. No matter where the work place was, there were drug taking dope smoking people (don't ask me how I know) working in every industry in every type of position, including engineering. So you got boats like this, made like this. You got the Ford Pinto. You got some of the trash we had in aviation coming out at the time that wouldn't pass quality assurance at Briggs and Stratton. It was an amazing time of .. er...ah well, I really can't remember that much about it for some reason. I do remember it being a time of exciting things going on under interesting circumstances, so although it may have seemed we were doing amazing things back then, the actual results tell a very different story, like the one being illustrated here in this post that originally used construction nails to hold the deck down. What a concept. Seemed like a good idea to someone at the time, back in the seventies. Whew! What a bunch of garbage they all put out back then. No wonder.


    Okay, so enough of the seventies.


    After fitting the cap to the hull, it was time to install the bumper strip.


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    The bumper strip being installed. The rivets go through it and through the two hull pieces. Then the rubber bumper is installed. The rubber strip must be placed in the stern locations, left and right, and then stretched into place. Otherwise, if you start at one end of the strip and go around in one direction, it will always end up short.


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    Another view of the bumper strip install.


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    Engine coming out from under the work bench. 7 months on it's side. It spent about 9 years this way when I found it. By this time I had installed the windshield.


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    Ready for an engine.


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    The installation tool.


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    I have a boat now. This was three days before I launched it, on May 28.


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    A little leaner and meaner. It seems that out and back from the salmon grounds is about 5 gallons of gas, better than before. I love the very low freeboard. I really like smallness. Smallness offers certain advantages. In 8 foot seas halibut fishing, no problem. In 3 foot heavy wind chop, it can be a problem. Much stronger and lighter, still a 70's tri hull, but I have a toy to build some more mods into. Can't wait.


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    Planned mods will include a larger fishing area on deck. This ain't easy on a 15 footer.


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    The outboard external structural stringer in view, with stuff hanging off of it. 4 Scotty stainless wire pole holders. These are BY FAR my favorite holders. I have 5 of them, 4 deployed and one in storage for a center located pole in the trolling spread when needed.


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    On the maiden voyage, after shaking out some bugs in the first 30 minutes, I went out to the halibut grounds and drifted for 4.5 hours with one hookup that came unbuttoned, and then into the salmon grounds for one dinner fish before coming in. It was a superb maiden sea trial, lasting about 8 hours overall.


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    Transducer mounting. No holes in the transom this way with the blocks. Note the inboard one that I broke off one day hitting some bull kelp. JB Weld and I never had another problem with it. With the bilge the way it is now, I can mount a through hull transducer someday.


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    This shows the three bilge pump clear output hoses coming out of the bilge. They discharge into the splash well and over the transom.


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    Total bow compartment access, either on land or at sea. My two bow tanks are in there. Next season my windshield will be mounted on that hinged deck. The deck is 18mm hydrotek and supports the full weight of a heavy person. You can easily fish off of it. I've even napped on it.


    So the rest of this post will be the pilothouse construct.
     
  16. polfishski

    polfishski Well-Known "Member"

    Location:
    Descanso
    Name:
    Tom
    Boat:
    20 SkipJack (Tail Chaser)
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    That was a great read and very inspiring post. Thanks for sharing. Great work
     
  17. Stomper

    Stomper Clatu Verada Fishon

    Location:
    Humboldt Bay, Ca.
    Name:
    Robert Reed
    Boat:
    15 foot pilothouse trihull with radar and other electronics from hell
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    So we enter the third winter of fooling around in the garage with this 70's thing. That was last winter, 2012-2013. I started it so late like a complete dummy, that I didn't get done until a week before salmon season closed up here in early September. I think I was done about August 25th or something like that, so this took me about 6 months. I got two good months of fishing in with the boat while I fished the lion's share of the season on my buddy's Davis Rock Harbor 25.

    No drawings or plans were used to do this. It was pretty much an exercise of cardboard patterns cut and trimmed, and even laying up wood pieces and cutting them to fit. I made a couple of sketches for ideas about the sliding canopy tracks and general look of the thing while amping on highly caffienated coffee late at night (the store clerk calls the stuff "tweaker coffee" which isn't far from the truth.


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    I built the foundation 2 years ago with this bow cover. It was made with this in mind.


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    Sketch out the base line in what looks about right. I'm not going to have to worry about the windshield frame bashing my forehead in during rough seas anymore. Pretty easy to see how it's done from here on.


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    The base panels cut out. Started with the center rectangle, and then cut the outer panels to fit. Compound angles done.


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    The center window panel rectangle. Outer panels cut to fit, those compound angles done.


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    And then trim the top to look better...


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    Looking a little better. Take it all off and use the patterns to cut plywood.


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    A paint can was used for the window radius tracing. I don't recommend this in hindsight since I used old school rubber window masks with locking strips. I originally was going to cut out plexiglass and bolt it to the wood but later went with laminated safety auto glass. The corner radius needs to be larger for the rubber masks but I was able to remove the wrinkles having installed dozens of truck windshields in the past.


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    Cut out the plywood


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    Cardboard is awesome stuff. Cardboard and packaging tape. Cardboard patterns and then trace to the wood, then cut out the wood.
     
  18. Stomper

    Stomper Clatu Verada Fishon

    Location:
    Humboldt Bay, Ca.
    Name:
    Robert Reed
    Boat:
    15 foot pilothouse trihull with radar and other electronics from hell
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    Continuing on..


    Working on the canopy. While deciding on opening windows and hatches, I decided it was just too much hassle to order windows and hatches and having to return them if I didn't like them. So I pumped some more high powered coffee and decided to do it fighter canopy style. It would slide back away from the wind shield frame like a fighter canopy would for visibility and fresh air, and the "hood hatch" would still open forward with the wind shield attached. The whole mess would be removable in about 10 minutes to have an open boat but I won't do that often if at all. It's smaller than it looks, the wind shield frame is only 19 inches high. The center roof piece is 9mm thick Aquatek mahogany ply, and the outer roof panels are 5mm Hydrotek mahogany ply. The wind shield frame is 12mm Hydrotek, and the fore deck that it's mounted to that hinges up and forward is 18mm Hydrotek. The Aquatek is lighter than Hydrotek. The whole thing was predicted to be probably be no more than about 80 lbs of weight and actually turned out to be about 90 when I was done..


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    Started with the center piece as always and built out from there.


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    The slope or rake angle of the canopy roof was a function of proportion mixed with having it high enough for some head room while in the pilot's seat. I think the roof of the thing is about neck high. I didn't want a standing up type of house. The boat is small so the house was small but protective against wind and rain. I was concerned about water intrusion and how I would seal the sliding roof to the windshield frame. More on that later as it turned out very interesting with good results.


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    Different views to get the correct perspective.


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    It would be trimmed and configured a little differently than here, with some twists and curves not yet made.


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    I was starting to worry about making the May 1 season opener and actually knew I would never make it. As it turned out I was 4 months late getting it in the water.
     
  19. Stomper

    Stomper Clatu Verada Fishon

    Location:
    Humboldt Bay, Ca.
    Name:
    Robert Reed
    Boat:
    15 foot pilothouse trihull with radar and other electronics from hell
    • Messages:
      (148)
    • Likes Received:
      (30)
    The canopy was developing more. After I got the top secured, I fabbed the sides and then cut it for the sliding canopy setup.
    I was wondering if it would stand the POUNDING of the tri hull scenario in the evil waters of the Pacific Ocean? Could I build it strong enough and light enough? That was the question......


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    Forward leaning windshields are totally the bomb when it comes to needing a more roomy feel and giving yourself more space in front of your fat face. The top of the old windshield frame was directly above the steering wheel, dangerous with this bone jarring tri hull. The other benefit of the forward sweep is the instantaneous clearing of ocean spray off the glass when on the run. A little rainex and it's amazing how fast the spray disappears with this setup.


    [​IMG]


    Lots of late nights.
     
  20. Stomper

    Stomper Clatu Verada Fishon

    Location:
    Humboldt Bay, Ca.
    Name:
    Robert Reed
    Boat:
    15 foot pilothouse trihull with radar and other electronics from hell
    • Messages:
      (148)
    • Likes Received:
      (30)
    For the rest of this post, I'm just going to copy my original post from the Humboldt Tuna forum as it was posted there last year. It was written while I was building, so it's mostly in present tense.
    =====

    I was brainstorming just standing there, looking at this thing while the morning high caffeine content special brew coffee was kicking in. That's how it's being built, just making it up as I go along without any drawings except some sketches for ideas. I've been reworking this sketch over the life of the project. The sketch shows the windshield farther forward than it really is.


    [​IMG]
    This morning I was working out more details of the rail that the sliding canopy will be on. Also, I worked out the details of how to secure the canopy in any position after opening it. This is smaller than it looks, so it's not going to be a problem to move it fore and aft and lock it in place. Should give me plenty of air ventilation when it's open. This will be necessary for preservation of life support due to the DEADLY fumes from the 70's Frankenstein Chrysler outboard.


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    Later I'll show how the roof and windshield separate when the canopy is slid aft. Here the pieces are clamped, awaiting a glass layup.


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    So I tacked the pieces in place with some glass strips just to hold them in place so I can remove the clamps.


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    The inside and back side of the windshield frame. Those tacked on vertical strips will come back with the canopy roof. They will be pretty heavily glassed down for rigidity.


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    Fairly straight. I put in a small twist to the outer canopy roof panels so they would slope down a little more at the rear of the canopy.


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    More diddling on paper, working it out in my brain.


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    The roof will go back with the canopy. That horizontally mounted strip will stay with the windshield frame. The vertical strip behind the windshield will be part of the canopy roof and will slide away from the windshield frame with the roof.


    So I cut a few more pieces at a casual pace. I have the whole week off this next week, so I can get some stuff done on this. I'm beginning the get an idea of what this will look like.


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    It's self supporting now, and I'm beginning the sides. The base track pieces will probably be worked out in the next day or so.


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    Different views for perspective...


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    Different lighting even..


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    Can't wait to see it done with paint on it. All white.
     

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