Pros of a lower gear ratio

Discussion in 'Fishing Chit Chat' started by Jonathan nunez, Jan 7, 2019.

  1. Jonathan nunez

    Jonathan nunez Newbie

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    im just curious as to what the pros are to having a lower gear ratio then a higher one..
     
  2. InDeepShip

    InDeepShip Ah ship

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    More torque. Faster gear ratio less torque so when your trying to winch on a fish its harder to turn the handle. This is why 2 speeds are amazing. When you are retrieving a yo-yo at 5.4:1 its great for the speed but when you get bit you can shift down to the 2:1 and its like reeling in a calico.
     
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  3. Jonathan nunez

    Jonathan nunez Newbie

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    Thanks I was looking to get a tranx 300 they make a 5:1 and 7:1, it’ll will mostly be used for calico and small yellowtail
     
  4. OIF VET

    OIF VET Well-Known "Member"

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    Just my 2 cents and they ain’t worth shit. The best iron reels and rods came from before all this fast retrieve high end reels and graphiter rods and crap. All glass 8-10 foot rod and a medium retrieve reel. Example daiwa has a new series of reels to replace the bg series. Get the lower gear ratio. No need for the high end gear ratio. Why are all the reels changing when the jigs that cought all the fish haven’t changed.
     
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  5. InDeepShip

    InDeepShip Ah ship

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    Personally, i love my MXL for live bait stuff and dropper loop. The thing with those is that when your fishing that low your doing alot of pumping of the rod so you almost want the higher end to retrieve to take up line when letting the rod back down. if your going for under 10lb yellows and calicos i think either would be great. I used a friends lexa 300 and caught a decent size WSB on it and thats what caused me to buy a lexa 400 and use it as my calico and yellowtail reel they are great and they are pretty cheap.
     
  6. hucklongfin

    hucklongfin Deep release specialist

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    Go for the 7:1 on the TranX 300. On small reels, like a 300, if I can't crank, I can lift with the rod and then crank down with the reel. My TranX 300 is 7:1.
     
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  7. here'smymule

    here'smymule Well-Known "Member"

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    Capt. Bruce Root of the SportKing used 3.6 to 1 gears in Newell reels fishing Barracuda where the slow retrieve is desirable.
     
  8. hucklongfin

    hucklongfin Deep release specialist

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    A Newell 332 with 3.6:1 gears got 23.5" per crank.
    A Newell 332 with 5:1 gears got 32" per crank.
    A TranX 300 with 5.8:1 gears gets 30" per crank.
    A TranX 300 with 7.6:1 gears gets 40" per crank.
    No one says you have to crank fast all the time but if you need to it's a whole lot easier with the higher gears. I've caught Calicos and YFT on my TranX 300HG.

    If you want a wider choice of speeds look at the Daiwa Lexa 300. Between the Lexa WN, CC and HD they have 5.5:1, 6.3:1, 7.1:1, 8:1 giving between 25.1" to 37"
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2019
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  9. Heartoak

    Heartoak Member

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    I would go with the lower ratio reel for Calicos etc for bait or lure fishing. As already stated here lower ratio gives better pulling power. Also most all of the effective lures are easily worked with 5 or 6 to 1 ratio reels. I recently caught a huge leopard shark on a 363 komodo and was very happy it was not geared any higher. I have a Lexa Winn with 7 to 1 and it is a nice reel but I feel like it is geared too high when hooked up to a decent sized fish.
    The only time I think higher gearing is good is when I am reeling in a bait that needs to be changed. And for that I just spin the handle faster than normal. I throw surface iron with a Komodo 463 (6.3 to 1) and I have to say I find I get bit best when I remember to slow the retrieve way down. In other words it is geared a little bit too high for that type of fishing.
    Hth, Jeff
     
  10. Jonathan nunez

    Jonathan nunez Newbie

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    Thanks guy
     
  11. geebee

    geebee Member

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    PRO: a low gear ratio provides torque (easier to turn the handle under load)
    CON: a low gear reels line in slower than a higher gear ratio (higher gear harder to turn the handle under load)

    think of a 10-speed bicycle analogy to compare 3- and 2-speed fishing reel versus 1-speed reels

    if you are trying to pedal UPHILL (and don't have an optimal low gear) it's a lot of huffing and puffing until you tire out altogether - not a pleasant experience at all

    likewise - if you are trying to pedal DOWNHILL (and don't have an optimal high gear) it's a lot of fast work to keep the pedals under load - eventually you won't be able to keep up

    any experienced cyclist will tell you the key to bike riding over distance is maintaing a sustainable rotational rhythm that your body can handle

    some types of fishing benefit from a fast retrieve (jig fishing, for example)

    big fish are a lot easier on us to get back to the boat under a low gear (like pedaling up a hill Vs pumping, huffing, and horsing a beast up to the rail)

    the 2-speed reel benefits kick in above 40-pound line, IMHO, because most of us can muscle 7-10 pounds of drag (17-35 lbs of drag a different story)
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2019
  12. Sandydog

    Sandydog Member

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    It's not just a matter of being easier to turn. Unless you have the rod in a gimbaled fighting belt, the torque you apply to the handle has to be canceled out by your other hand holding the rod. Otherwise your rod twists (reel flops side to side) as you crank.

    That hand will have a much shorter lever arm. It's less than an inch from the axis of rotation (where your hand contacts the hypalon grip), while the handle is a good 6-10 inches or so. So it needs to apply about 10x more force than you cranking hand to counter the tendency of the reel to flop side-to-side as you crank. A lower gear ratio reduces the torque applied by your cranking hand, which in turn reduces the force your holding hand needs to apply to keep the rod from twisting.

    So it's actually the mid-weight setups which benefit most from having a low gear. The smaller reels don't generate enough cranking force for you to have a problem using your other hand to prevent the rod from twisting. The heavier reels are usually used with a gimbaled fighting belt, and the fixed gimbal prevents the rod from twisting. The mid-size reels aren't used with a fighting belt, but can require high cranking forces which results in the reel flopping side to side.

    The fighting straps which clip on to the top of the reel help solve the same problem. They're not just for helping pull the rod up on a heavy fish. They also help prevent this reel flopping as you crank.
     
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  13. Heartoak

    Heartoak Member

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    Guys the OP is asking this question in regards to a relatively small reel....Tranx 300 in this case. Based on using reels of similar size I would have to say the lower ratio versions are going to work just fine. If he hooks up with a decent YT etc.....having the lower ratio helps quite a bit. And it is easier on the drag and reel frame. I have pulled on some decent sized fish with a 300 series Komodo that is 6-3 to 1 ratio and it would be a better reel if it had a slightly lower gear ratio. Just my take on it.
    Jeff
     
  14. Paulo Grandez

    Paulo Grandez Member

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    I've been fishing Lexas 400 and 300 7.1 gear ratio for about five years now and I've never had a problem reeling in a big fish. I don't understand where this hatred for the high gear ratios comes from, I think it's mostly the older guys who just hate change.
     
  15. geebee

    geebee Member

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    InDeepShip nailed the OP in the first reply - rest is more same in other words

    i think any hatred is more personality than age, but i may be a bit biased as an older guy who's witnessed the hardware improvements and appreciates BOTH the high and low gears in my reels

    now if i could just go back and fish nineteen '50s waters with 21st century gear...
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2019
  16. Heartoak

    Heartoak Member

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    Paulo; Take a chill pill man :eek:
    Trust me nobody hates you if you choose to use a high ratio reel. And sure you can land almost anything on one. But it isn't necessarily optimum for a lot of situations. I believe the OP was looking for our opinions on what is optimum. And it doesn't have anything to do with new stuff versus old school or old guys.

    You shouldn't try to make something out of it that has nothing to do with the question. It is just simple physics.......lower gearing gives you more mechanical advantage while at the same time reduces the strain on the reel.
    FYI...... most of us "older guys" know this from experience.
    Jeff
     
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  17. cksea

    cksea <*}}}<

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    inches per crank is more important. With out spool diameter ratio is not telling the whole story.
     
  18. cksea

    cksea <*}}}<

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    Small spool dia. effectively lowering the final drive which is all that matter.
     
  19. Heartoak

    Heartoak Member

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    They don't produce these models of reels with different diameter spools for each gear ratio. So the lower ratio is always going to result in a better mechanical advantage. One "truth" here is the only way the ultra high speed versions of these little reels work at all is because these reels have a small diameter spool and are made as well as they are. Can you imagine pulling on a cow with 7 or 8 to 1 ratios on a large reel?
    Jeff
     

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