Progressive or non progressive press

Discussion in 'Gun Talk' started by stella marina, Jul 5, 2019.

  1. stella marina

    stella marina Well-Known "Member"

    Location:
    santa cruz
    Name:
    Andrew
    Boat:
    Parker 2320, 16 Klamath cc, 10 ft Livingston "bass slayer"
    • Messages:
      (1,096)
    • Likes Received:
      (336)
    I'm looking at getting into reloading...I shoot 6.5 grendel, 308, 243, 30 06 and 223. Including most typical hand gun calibers. A progressive press seem nice, but more complicated and finicky.
    I'm looking at getting something i can have for years, that i won't want to upgrade in a year .
    What do you guys have? And what do you like about it? Or dislike about it.
     
  2. DennisV

    DennisV Well-Known "Member"

    Location:
    Paloma, CA
    Name:
    Dennis Vagt
    Boat:
    Just a NuCanoe Frontier now.
    • Messages:
      (462)
    • Likes Received:
      (658)
    It depends on if you want to do precision shooting or just shoot the hell out of everything you see. I went the Rockchucker route myself for precision target and hunting loads.

    I have a complete set of RCBS reloading equipment plus a lot of components for loading 308 /30-06/223/45acp/38,357.

    Literally everything you need with the exception of dial calipers. Good stuff in very good condition.

    I'm done with that hobby and I'll make you good deal on the whole set up.
     
  3. the_tunaman

    the_tunaman Well-Known "Member"

    Location:
    Norco
    Name:
    Roger Nelson
    Boat:
    Ranger Z20
    • Messages:
      (513)
    • Likes Received:
      (579)
    Dillon... buy once cry once.

    I have a 550 and have owned it for probably 10 years. Guaranteed for life - their warranty is unsurpassed.

    Here’s some info I posted in a thread on the Hide:

     
    Bigpondonly likes this.
  4. stella marina

    stella marina Well-Known "Member"

    Location:
    santa cruz
    Name:
    Andrew
    Boat:
    Parker 2320, 16 Klamath cc, 10 ft Livingston "bass slayer"
    • Messages:
      (1,096)
    • Likes Received:
      (336)
    That's the unit I've been looking at the 550c looks to be the one . Do you have multiple conversion heads to quickly change from calibers?
     
  5. the_tunaman

    the_tunaman Well-Known "Member"

    Location:
    Norco
    Name:
    Roger Nelson
    Boat:
    Ranger Z20
    • Messages:
      (513)
    • Likes Received:
      (579)
    I do... I load for about 15 different calibers, and have about 20 toolheads set up. It’s one of the best features, as it makes caliber changes very fast and simple.
     
    stella marina likes this.
  6. mike garrahan

    mike garrahan TheSabreGuy

    Location:
    la habra hts
    Name:
    mike garrahan
    Boat:
    23 ft. crestliner
    • Messages:
      (1,631)
    • Likes Received:
      (1,217)
    It all depends on how much shooting you do, how much time you want to spend reloading and how much money you want to spend. If you do a ton of shooting and you don't like spending a lot of time at the reloading bench and you don't mind spending a ton of money then a Dillon progressive is the way to go. If you don't do a lot of shooting and you don't mind spending time reloading then an RCBS single stage press will work just fine. A lot of times you can pick up a set of dies for $25 or $30 so your investment for each new caliber is very low.
    I have a Hollywood single stage press, an RCBS single stage and an RCBS turret press. They all work just fine. You just take your time and you will be surprised how much ammo you can turn out in a few hours. The turret press is nice. You can set up dies for .38, 9mm and .45 and just rotate around depending on which caliber you want to load. Also if you get a hand priming tool it makes things go faster and easier.
     
    stella marina likes this.
  7. Jim n cali

    Jim n cali Member

    Location:
    TEXAS
    Name:
    Jim
    Boat:
    None
    • Messages:
      (587)
    • Likes Received:
      (143)
    RCBS. Load one at a time and enjoy the labors. You’ll more than likely Never have a failure or Squib as some like to call it. Besides fine tuning is where it’s at and that Can’t be done progressively.
     
  8. the_tunaman

    the_tunaman Well-Known "Member"

    Location:
    Norco
    Name:
    Roger Nelson
    Boat:
    Ranger Z20
    • Messages:
      (513)
    • Likes Received:
      (579)
    Wow - that is just plain ignorant, sorry to say.

    (Edited to include the quote for reference)
     
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2019
  9. el Toro

    el Toro I've posted enough I should edit this section

    Location:
    Point Loma
    Name:
    Nate
    Boat:
    Artemis
    • Messages:
      (9,059)
    • Likes Received:
      (1,552)
    Depends on shooting volume. I don’t shoot a ton and only for a couple of kinda oddball calibers I’ve got. RCBS Rockchucker works for me. It’s not the most precise and it’s no Dillon for sure, but for the money and for hunting accuracy, I think it’s great. To me the time in reloading is the set up and the case cleaning and prep. Expedite that part of the process and you can load up a few boxes in no time.
     
  10. TEAMFISH

    TEAMFISH JUST ADD WATER

    Location:
    TORRANCE
    Name:
    DAVE
    Boat:
    25' Skipjack Fisherman
    • Messages:
      (1,810)
    • Likes Received:
      (947)
    I have a Dillon XL650 and currently do all my handgun loads with it. Only a few rifle cartridges at the moment, (300WM, .223/5.56, 30-30, 30-06) when I do start to reload those I'm going to go the single stage route.
    Dillon's lifetime warranty is just that, no B.S. warranty. Have had mine for 25+ years
     
  11. Bigpondonly

    Bigpondonly Bloodydecks Seafood Co.

    Location:
    San Diego
    Name:
    Dave
    Boat:
    Parker 2120
    • Messages:
      (1,482)
    • Likes Received:
      (255)
    Another vote for the dillon 550. 9mm, .45, .223 are all easy peasy.
     
  12. stella marina

    stella marina Well-Known "Member"

    Location:
    santa cruz
    Name:
    Andrew
    Boat:
    Parker 2320, 16 Klamath cc, 10 ft Livingston "bass slayer"
    • Messages:
      (1,096)
    • Likes Received:
      (336)
    I think I'm more confused now....lol...seems like the Dillon is great for volume and the lifetime warranty, single stage for keeping things simple.
    I'd love the dillon, but for the sake of learning reloading, I might go single stage.
     
  13. the_tunaman

    the_tunaman Well-Known "Member"

    Location:
    Norco
    Name:
    Roger Nelson
    Boat:
    Ranger Z20
    • Messages:
      (513)
    • Likes Received:
      (579)
    As you wish... it’s your decision and your money. You can turn out great ammo with an RCBS, Redding or Hornady single stage press. It really boils down to workflows, downtime (caliber and stage changes) and available time.
     
    TEAMFISH likes this.
  14. Jim n cali

    Jim n cali Member

    Location:
    TEXAS
    Name:
    Jim
    Boat:
    None
    • Messages:
      (587)
    • Likes Received:
      (143)
    LOL
     
  15. TEAMFISH

    TEAMFISH JUST ADD WATER

    Location:
    TORRANCE
    Name:
    DAVE
    Boat:
    25' Skipjack Fisherman
    • Messages:
      (1,810)
    • Likes Received:
      (947)
    Most guys prefer to do precision rifle rounds one at a time or at least have the ability to be precise on powder control, cartridge length, crimping...a Dillon is pretty accurate and I have no problem trusting it with handgun loads. I'm also not trying to crank out 1,000 rounds of 300win mag. in an hour.
     
    stella marina likes this.
  16. Aggro

    Aggro Keepin my pimp hand strong!

    Location:
    Clairemont
    Name:
    AGGRO
    Boat:
    skiff
    • Messages:
      (13,257)
    • Likes Received:
      (2,230)
    Another vote for single stage though I have several progressives. If you are learning it's the way to go. Spend time making sure you are spot on. Reloading can be dangerous if you don't know what you are doing. Go slow and go sober.
     
    stella marina likes this.
  17. the_tunaman

    the_tunaman Well-Known "Member"

    Location:
    Norco
    Name:
    Roger Nelson
    Boat:
    Ranger Z20
    • Messages:
      (513)
    • Likes Received:
      (579)
    Which is precisely why I advocate the 550 over some other progressive... simple to use as a single stage in addition to being able to load in progressive mode.
     
    Bigpondonly and TEAMFISH like this.
  18. stella marina

    stella marina Well-Known "Member"

    Location:
    santa cruz
    Name:
    Andrew
    Boat:
    Parker 2320, 16 Klamath cc, 10 ft Livingston "bass slayer"
    • Messages:
      (1,096)
    • Likes Received:
      (336)
  19. the_tunaman

    the_tunaman Well-Known "Member"

    Location:
    Norco
    Name:
    Roger Nelson
    Boat:
    Ranger Z20
    • Messages:
      (513)
    • Likes Received:
      (579)
    Kits are a good starting point.
     
    stella marina likes this.
  20. Wild Bill

    Wild Bill Drinking the Suzuki Kool-aid and liking it!

    Location:
    Camano Island
    Name:
    Steve
    Boat:
    Otter Craft
    • Messages:
      (3,114)
    • Likes Received:
      (2,879)
    I have been reloading for many calibers for 40 yrs and here are my thoughts. You will always have a use for a single stage press if you actively pursue the hobby. They are relatively inexpensive, robust and straight forward to learn how to use. Most of the rifle cartridges you mention are not usually shot in high volume and a progressive would be overkill. Cartridges like 223 and 9mm lend themselves to higher volume shooting but prices on loaded ammo generally make it not worth the effort to reload unless we are talking specialty loadings. So I would advocate starting with a single stage, learning the ropes and see where it takes you. If you get into competition and are shooting thousands of rounds a month then you can add a progressive to the bench with a solid foundation of understanding how to load gleaned through learning on a single stage. That single stage will never become obsolete as it works great as a depriming station using a lee universal decap die to remove primers before tumbling or to unstick brass out of a sizing die. Start simple and see where the hobby takes you before dropping the coin on a progressive. That is my .02 cents anyway. As far as a kit I would not recommend that one as it is a turret press. I would start with a basic Rcbs rock chucker supreme kit that is single stage.
     
    Bigpondonly and stella marina like this.

Share This Page