Progressive or non progressive press

stella marina

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I'm looking at getting into reloading...I shoot 6.5 grendel, 308, 243, 30 06 and 223. Including most typical hand gun calibers. A progressive press seem nice, but more complicated and finicky.
I'm looking at getting something i can have for years, that i won't want to upgrade in a year .
What do you guys have? And what do you like about it? Or dislike about it.
 

DennisV

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It depends on if you want to do precision shooting or just shoot the hell out of everything you see. I went the Rockchucker route myself for precision target and hunting loads.

I have a complete set of RCBS reloading equipment plus a lot of components for loading 308 /30-06/223/45acp/38,357.

Literally everything you need with the exception of dial calipers. Good stuff in very good condition.

I'm done with that hobby and I'll make you good deal on the whole set up.
 

the_tunaman

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Dillon... buy once cry once.

I have a 550 and have owned it for probably 10 years. Guaranteed for life - their warranty is unsurpassed.

Here’s some info I posted in a thread on the Hide:

I’ve had my 550 for about 10 years and have also loaded countless rounds with it. Fortunately I had great counsel when I first got serious about reloading, and took his advice.

Most of the time I’m using mine in single-stage mode, which is one of the best reasons for the 550 over the 650 IMHO. I am loading a lot of precision rounds for my .260, 6.5x47 and 7.5x55, so single stage works best for that application. I am also able to reload for my FN FiveseveN.

I load for about 15 different calibers on it. Most of the other calibers I run in progressive mode, which moves along pretty well and can put out plenty of ammo in a relatively short period of time.

I have around 25 toolheads, each permanently set up with dies configured for each application. Caliber changes take about a minute without a primer setup change, or less than 5 minutes if I have to switch from large to small or small to large primer assemblies.

I find that the Dillon powder funnels are adequate for most of the plinking applications I use them for - 30-06, 44 Spl/Mag, 38 Spl/357 Mag, 9mm.
 
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stella marina

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Dillon... buy once cry once.

I have a 550 and have owned it for probably 10 years. Guaranteed for life - their warranty is unsurpassed.

Here’s some info I posted in a thread on the Hide:
That's the unit I've been looking at the 550c looks to be the one . Do you have multiple conversion heads to quickly change from calibers?
 

the_tunaman

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I do... I load for about 15 different calibers, and have about 20 toolheads set up. It’s one of the best features, as it makes caliber changes very fast and simple.
 
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mike garrahan

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It all depends on how much shooting you do, how much time you want to spend reloading and how much money you want to spend. If you do a ton of shooting and you don't like spending a lot of time at the reloading bench and you don't mind spending a ton of money then a Dillon progressive is the way to go. If you don't do a lot of shooting and you don't mind spending time reloading then an RCBS single stage press will work just fine. A lot of times you can pick up a set of dies for $25 or $30 so your investment for each new caliber is very low.
I have a Hollywood single stage press, an RCBS single stage and an RCBS turret press. They all work just fine. You just take your time and you will be surprised how much ammo you can turn out in a few hours. The turret press is nice. You can set up dies for .38, 9mm and .45 and just rotate around depending on which caliber you want to load. Also if you get a hand priming tool it makes things go faster and easier.
 
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Jim n cali

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RCBS. Load one at a time and enjoy the labors. You’ll more than likely Never have a failure or Squib as some like to call it. Besides fine tuning is where it’s at and that Can’t be done progressively.
 

the_tunaman

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Besides fine tuning is where it’s at and that Can’t be done progressively.
Wow - that is just plain ignorant, sorry to say.

(Edited to include the quote for reference)
 
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el Toro

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Depends on shooting volume. I don’t shoot a ton and only for a couple of kinda oddball calibers I’ve got. RCBS Rockchucker works for me. It’s not the most precise and it’s no Dillon for sure, but for the money and for hunting accuracy, I think it’s great. To me the time in reloading is the set up and the case cleaning and prep. Expedite that part of the process and you can load up a few boxes in no time.
 

TEAMFISH

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I have a Dillon XL650 and currently do all my handgun loads with it. Only a few rifle cartridges at the moment, (300WM, .223/5.56, 30-30, 30-06) when I do start to reload those I'm going to go the single stage route.
Dillon's lifetime warranty is just that, no B.S. warranty. Have had mine for 25+ years
 

Bigpondonly

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Another vote for the dillon 550. 9mm, .45, .223 are all easy peasy.
 

stella marina

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I think I'm more confused now....lol...seems like the Dillon is great for volume and the lifetime warranty, single stage for keeping things simple.
I'd love the dillon, but for the sake of learning reloading, I might go single stage.
 

the_tunaman

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As you wish... it’s your decision and your money. You can turn out great ammo with an RCBS, Redding or Hornady single stage press. It really boils down to workflows, downtime (caliber and stage changes) and available time.
 
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TEAMFISH

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I think I'm more confused now....lol...seems like the Dillon is great for volume and the lifetime warranty, single stage for keeping things simple.
I'd love the dillon, but for the sake of learning reloading, I might go single stage.
Most guys prefer to do precision rifle rounds one at a time or at least have the ability to be precise on powder control, cartridge length, crimping...a Dillon is pretty accurate and I have no problem trusting it with handgun loads. I'm also not trying to crank out 1,000 rounds of 300win mag. in an hour.
 
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Aggro

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Another vote for single stage though I have several progressives. If you are learning it's the way to go. Spend time making sure you are spot on. Reloading can be dangerous if you don't know what you are doing. Go slow and go sober.
 
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the_tunaman

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Which is precisely why I advocate the 550 over some other progressive... simple to use as a single stage in addition to being able to load in progressive mode.
 

Wild Bill

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I have been reloading for many calibers for 40 yrs and here are my thoughts. You will always have a use for a single stage press if you actively pursue the hobby. They are relatively inexpensive, robust and straight forward to learn how to use. Most of the rifle cartridges you mention are not usually shot in high volume and a progressive would be overkill. Cartridges like 223 and 9mm lend themselves to higher volume shooting but prices on loaded ammo generally make it not worth the effort to reload unless we are talking specialty loadings. So I would advocate starting with a single stage, learning the ropes and see where it takes you. If you get into competition and are shooting thousands of rounds a month then you can add a progressive to the bench with a solid foundation of understanding how to load gleaned through learning on a single stage. That single stage will never become obsolete as it works great as a depriming station using a lee universal decap die to remove primers before tumbling or to unstick brass out of a sizing die. Start simple and see where the hobby takes you before dropping the coin on a progressive. That is my .02 cents anyway. As far as a kit I would not recommend that one as it is a turret press. I would start with a basic Rcbs rock chucker supreme kit that is single stage.
 

Ryanbsimmcon1

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I would recommend taking a reloading class. Dillon 550 and a Rockchucker. You will use that Rockchucker for decapping. I personally prefer single stage reloading. This hobby is almost as fun as shooting!
 
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aeon

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All depends on your level of crazy you require in your reloads. For pistol and the casual rifle plinker the progressive press is fine and will turn out quality ammo that matches factory ammo. For match winning rifle shooting the amount of crazy never ends, chasing a 5" x ring at 1000k yards is the land of single stage presses, bullet and brass sorting, weighing powder on 800$ digital scales, measuring seating pressure, annealing and other black magic. All in a effort to get runout near zero and load to load speed as small as possible.

I can crank out can shooting and coyote hunting ammo in no time. My fclass match ammo takes hours and hours longer.
 

nicky

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I have a Dillon 550B for 45ACP, and 2 Dillon XL650 with case feeders to load 223 and 9mm, which I shoot about 3-4000 rounds each every year. I shoot subsonic 147gr 9mm with my cans, which is really expensive if I have to buy the ammo.

I would never get rid of my single stage Lee breech lock, I de-cap/size all my rifle brass on it before wet tumble.


My then 7yo started shooting last year, so for we burned 6k of 22LR just this year. He'll be moving on to centerfire rifles and pistols, we are gonna need more stock pile.

Dillon just came out with 750 to replace 650, it should be nice.

Disclaimer: I moved out of California a decade ago, to where guns are legal, and my carry permit cost 75 buck and 3 weeks to receove, and it never expires.
 

jgy

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Get both. You can get a cheap single stage used for $50.

Since you're doing a lot of rifle reloads, the progressive will save you a lot of time in just the brass prep alone. I used to prep brass on a single stage and now do it all on a progressive. For precision loads, I finish off on the single stage. For plinking, I use the progressive.
 

stella marina

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Get both. You can get a cheap single stage used for $50.

Since you're doing a lot of rifle reloads, the progressive will save you a lot of time in just the brass prep alone. I used to prep brass on a single stage and now do it all on a progressive. For precision loads, I finish off on the single stage. For plinking, I use the progressive.
I got the lyman turret press, has spaces for 6 dies...either 2 3 sets or 3 2sets
I Figured that's a good way to start...I'd like to take a class to get me started...I purchased the hornady instruction book, and have read it, but I learn by doing it...I can't wait to load my own hunting rounds this year....and people I've talked to say hand loading 6.5 grendel is way more accurate than factory loads.