Permanent mount VHF?

Reel 007

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Jun 12, 2006
1,911
1,089
Glendora Ca
Name
Leon
Boat Name
28 Wellcraft Coastal "vagabond'
The Shakespeare Phase 3 is a lot more money - Any feedback on why this one is more expensive? It is worth it?
I have had mine for about four years now, it works fine, the mast (fiberglass portion) is heavier than other Shakespeare antennas the base is heavy stainless steel, the Phase III seems better constructed than other antennas.
Previously I had a Digital model 992-MW the base was badly corroded after a couple seasons.
...And yes, I think it's worth the extra dollars.
 
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ShadowX

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Oct 10, 2010
3,118
4,727
Los Angeles
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Anonymous
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None
The Shakespeare Phase 3 is a lot more money - Any feedback on why this one is more expensive? It is worth it?

I wouldn't say its a lot more expensive. The 5225XT is the low end, but the higher end 5225XP is $250-$300, so the price difference isn't much.

Some of the reasons why the Phase III is more expensive than a 5225XT antenna:

1) Its rated for 150W instead of 100W (5225)
2) Has a S0239 connector instead of cable directly attached so you can use higher grade cables
3) Has silver plating (the 5225XR has silver, but the 5225XT is unplated brass/copper)
4) Warranty is 8 years instead of 5 for the 5225XT

Both antennas are collinear phased 5/8 wave elements, so the performance should be comparable other than the silver plating on the Phase III antennas.

The 5225XT comes with 20 foot of RG8/X cable which is worth about $20, but the Phase 3 allows you to change out to higher quality cables like RG213/U, 400MAX, LMR-400, etc if needed.
 
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Bend Session

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  • Jan 3, 2017
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    SEAWOLF
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    JACK COLE SPECIAL
    I wouldn't say its a lot more expensive. The 5225XT is the low end, but the higher end 5225XP is $250-$300, so the price difference isn't much.

    Some of the reasons why the Phase III is more expensive than a 5225XT antenna:

    1) Its rated for 150W instead of 100W (5225)
    2) Has a S0239 connector instead of cable directly attached so you can use higher grade cables
    3) Has silver plating (the 5225XR has silver, but the 5225XT is unplated brass/copper)
    4) Warranty is 8 years instead of 5 for the 5225XT

    Both antennas are collinear phased 5/8 wave elements, so the performance should be comparable other than the silver plating on the Phase III antennas.
    On west marine’s website - they don’t have the 5225XP - could that be the Shakespeare 8900? That has the silver plated brass element and is $250
     
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    Bend Session

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  • Jan 3, 2017
    1,079
    801
    COSTA MESA
    Name
    SEAWOLF
    Boat Name
    JACK COLE SPECIAL
    On west marine’s website - they don’t have the 5225XP - could that be the Shakespeare 8900? That has the silver plated brass element and is $250
    Just answer my own question - called Shakespeare and they said the 5225XP is the same product as the 8900 - guess the 8700 and 8900 are private labels for west marine
     
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    ShadowX

    I Post A Lot But I Can't Edit This
    Oct 10, 2010
    3,118
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    Just answer my own question - called Shakespeare and they said the 5225XP is the same product as the 8900 - guess the 8700 and 8900 are private labels for west marine

    It could be. That is one of the reason why Shakespeare has a very confusing line of products. There is a lot of overlap and confusion on the differences between the different products. It would be much easier if they just make a matrix that compares the different models. I think if they did that, it would clear up a lot of the confusion.
     
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    May 13, 2004
    762
    1,018
    75
    Long Beach and points due west
    Name
    Bob Ballew
    Boat Name
    2520 Parker with twin 200 Yamahas
    ...One issue not mentioned is interference from other electronics and wiring...It is recommended to keep antennas at least 3' from other antennas and electronics, plus, run the wiring separate from the bundled wiring found on most boats. It also helps when changing out antennas, as you don't have to clip off the plastic fastners holding all the wiring bundles.
    ... Contrary to most opinions, I have had good luck with center pin quick-connectors (no soldering required). Just make sure the pin is well centered in the coating..
    ...Connector shortages exist, so, it is a good idea to get those before installing the antenna....The wide selection can get confusing with little help from the sales clerks....Also, the general opinion is to not shorten your antenna wiring to less than 10', although others say 3' is the minimum cutoff for a run..Any expert advice on that issue is appreciated...
    ...I recently installed a 8900 antenna for my 2nd backup radio, with good reception; using the quick-connector....
     
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    ShadowX

    I Post A Lot But I Can't Edit This
    Oct 10, 2010
    3,118
    4,727
    Los Angeles
    Name
    Anonymous
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    ...One issue not mentioned is interference from other electronics and wiring...It is recommended to keep antennas at least 3' from other antennas and electronics, plus, run the wiring separate from the bundled wiring found on most boats. It also helps when changing out antennas, as you don't have to clip off the plastic fastners holding all the wiring bundles.
    ... Contrary to most opinions, I have had good luck with center pin quick-connectors (no sodering required). Just make sure the pin is well centered in the coating..
    ...Connector shortages exist, so, it is a good idea to get those before installing the antenna....The wide selection can get confusing with little help from the sales clerks....Also, the general opinion is to not shorten your antenna wiring to less than 10', although others say 3' is the minimum cutoff for a run..Any expert advice on that issue is appreciated...
    ...I recently installed a 8900 antenna for my 2nd backup radio, with good reception; using the quick-connector....

    I personally prefer to solder and crimp all my UHF connectors. However, a properly installed solderless connector is still far superior to an improperly installed UHF connector. The common mistake is to not solder the center pin and also the ground braid to the connector. I've seen my share of horror stories on people who just pushed the connector in and wonder why they have bad transmission/reception. Generally, they blame the antenna.
     
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