Outriggers, yea or nea?

Discussion in 'Washington Fishing Reports' started by TexMojoII, Feb 10, 2012.

  1. TexMojoII

    TexMojoII Well, Shit!

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    Larry
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    Well, while I was deployed, I bought some stuff for the boat and totally forgot about a pair of outriggers I had purchased. Nothing major, just some cheap ones that are 15 feet, I think their made by seachoice. Anyway, what do you guys think about using them for Tuna? I don't see many boats out at WP using them, I think I noticed one guy two years ago using for Salmon and that was it. Just thought I would get your take on them.
     
  2. goatram

    goatram Notable Member Gate Keeper to the Great Northwest

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  3. TexMojoII

    TexMojoII Well, Shit!

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    Thanks, I read that thread and it just made it more confusing. LOL, I may put them on this year, we will see. Still getting the hang of Tuna myself and I think we have been fortunate, other than having to be towed in, LOL, but we cavemen have boated fish each time out which is always positive. I only asked because I was rambling around in the garage looking for a beer and came across the outriggers, I had totally forgot about them. I think I will direct my focus on dialing in how we've been working so far since it has been productive and them tweak things later. I have bought three new tow ropes though. Thanks
     
  4. goatram

    goatram Notable Member Gate Keeper to the Great Northwest

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    The early part of the season when you want them. Have you not sat thru Father Todd's Seminar Yet? Get with the Program. If Bo has the open House this April You can See it and Buy a New Boat and trade in the Clunker. A good day on the Peninsular I would Think. Your SWMBOed might not think so.
    Even though I gave you the Idea Do not Blame me for any repercussions if you attend the Seminar and Whined up with a New Defiance.
     
  5. TexMojoII

    TexMojoII Well, Shit!

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    I looked at them at the boatshow but they never called me back. Tried to trade in my two derelict fish barges for one of their pretty floaters but I guess it was too much. A phone call one have been nice though. Yeah, divorce papers could be presented to me if I did pull the trigger, I am looking but, well, still looking over my shoulder. LOL
     
  6. jskfish

    jskfish Member

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    I use my outrigggers on almost every tuna trip. You certainly can catch fish without them but they improve your spread and provide you with another tool to enable a successful trip. There are times when the jigs on the rigger get hit more than the flat lines. If you already have them I would certainly use them:)
     
  7. easydoesit86

    easydoesit86 nubbie

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    I always thought about putting em on my boat, but never did cause I don't want the extra headaches and rigging. I'm still confused on the early season thing, if livebait is available I will always grab it and use it. I'd rather waste time livebait fishing than trolling around with outriggers catching a few fish. I think I want to concentrate on trolling deeper instead of wider. Don't get me wrong, a wider spread will produce more fish, but for me and my boat it's not worth the expense and hassle.
     
  8. Marlin Mike

    Marlin Mike pimpin aint cheap

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    outriggers are the way to go for early season tuna. up until three years ago they went on every trip with us. and were very sucessfull with them. Then we increased our arsenal and use them for the first part of the season and leave them dockside when the bait game is goin off.


    mm
     
  9. Roll the Bones

    Roll the Bones Dr. Fong

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    I am with the rest of the guys on the early season outrigger usage, it is a lot of fun watching a properly set spread go off and hooking 3-7 fish at a time. When it rolls into later in the season I seldom use them. Just look for birds and start pitching baits.
     
  10. wdlfbio

    wdlfbio Once you go Cat, you never go back

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    I hate the damn things, but we use them early on when fish are fewer and farther between. Figure we are more likely to rise fish with 6-7 rigs in the water over a larger area than 4-5. We don't troll to catch multiple, just hook one and then try to kill the rest via livies, iron, etc.
     
  11. Green Wasabi

    Green Wasabi Flip Squad

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    I've got them on my tin can boat and use them. I like using them. They work great.
     
  12. chadminnick

    chadminnick Newbie

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    I've never fished tuna here in the PNW, so forgive my ignorant question: why use outriggers in the early part of the season and not later?

    Is it because fish are closer to the surface earlier in the year then move deeper later so your methods change? Or is it because the availability of bait to feed on is more abundant later so you do better finding bait instead of trolling around the ocean?
     
  13. Marlin Mike

    Marlin Mike pimpin aint cheap

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    In the early part of the season the tuna will eat bout anything. As the seaon continues, they become a little more finicky and you need to try different tactics. just my opinion. Plus later on in the seaon there is the need for more room leavin at home just makes sence. If the live bait is goin off. You dont have cast around em and they just seem to be in the way,
     
  14. wdlfbio

    wdlfbio Once you go Cat, you never go back

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    Early on, there just aren't as many fish or schools around, so it may take more time to find them or it may take a greater spread to get them attracted. Outriggers allow us to cover more water with a larger spread.

    Later in the summer they are far more common and it doesnt take as much to find them. In addition, there are more of us out there working together so when one boat finds a good school, a quick radio call with coordinates and it's game on...
     
  15. Tower Todd

    Tower Todd Number #2

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    The number one reason for outriggers is to troll your gear outside of the whitewash in clean water where the fish can easily target them from below. They also allow for you to troll more lines without knitting a sweater.

    Earlier in the season the fish are not a schooled together as are later in the seaon as they haven't keyed on the bait so much. Once the fish start tightly schooling, trolling becomes less effective and bait will excel.

    TT
     
  16. chadminnick

    chadminnick Newbie

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    Thanks for the answers!
     
  17. Jailer1

    Jailer1 Sea Raider

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    :2gunsfiring_v1:
    This may sound stupid, but an old salty commercial guy gave me his opinion on the topic. He said that earlier in the season , the tuna are feeding more on squid, and not so much on the small wigglies .then when the season progresses, their diet changes to mostly schooling bait fish. If that makes sense, he did tell me to troll smaller jigs later in the season to help get hook ups, which sure did improve our troll, and transition to bait.
     
  18. kanuckle head

    kanuckle head Newbie

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    Another stupid reply: I do not know how a outrigger is rigged to enhanced surface fishing. I was only taught by downriggers :zelfmoord

    Is multiple lines able to be rigged on port & Star...........
    Sorry if I just Hi jack'd
    I am a sponge look'n 4 knowledge

    Peace
    Kh
     
  19. chadminnick

    chadminnick Newbie

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    Depending on the length of an outrigger, you can theoretically run more than one line horizontally. On a downrigger you're running them vertically.

    I don't fish for tuna here in the PNW but have fished a lot down south in the warm water offshore. I don't think I've ever seen more than two lines on an outrigger. There just isn't the space to separate the line to keep them untangled.
     
  20. fishchasr

    fishchasr Member

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    I wouldn't hunt tuna without them but I know several people to do and are still successful. I think I put more tuna in the box with them and believe outriggers are definately a plus for all the above reasons. I purchased entry level Dotline outriggers from cabela's during my first two seasons while learning the tuna game. Last summer I upgraded to better and heavier TACO brand riggers. So if anyone is interested in a fully rigged pair of Dotline riggers and bases, I've got a deal for you.
     

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