Offshore News- Big Bluefins on the offshore banks

PENN

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Mar 12, 2014
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after about 5 minutes it was pretty evident that they both hooked 2 big bluefins. My buddy also missed a hookup. The guy Ron fought his fish for over 20 minutes and had it to close color and almost gaff distance. We all saw the 60-70lb class bft. Finally ,just out of gaff distance it chewed through the leader and got his freedom. The lady was still fighting a even larger class Bluefin in the bow for 10-15 additional minutes. She has had multiple 100 lb class bft to her credit so she knew what she was doing.

About 2 hours later around the 295- we spotted some dolphins busting up about a mile out . As we glassed at the school. We saw tern birds working it. Hey those aren't dolphin- they are 150-200lb class Bluefin! As we got closer they disappeared- .[/QUOTE]

Maybe I'm reading this wrong, but it sounds like they were aware they were hooked up on BFT and then targeted a second school.
 
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peteking

Everybody take a look at the bad guy-T. Montana
Apr 21, 2013
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Amazing news and how cool just to be in the vicinity!

Steve, I've stated in multiple posts on BD, that BFT are ALWAYS in So. CA/Northern Baja. They simply are not here in the numbers that are here during the Summer.

It is the lack of offshore charter and commercial fishing from October-May that keeps them from showing in news and fish reports, as well as the unfortunate fact that they are very few in numbers due to the fact that MOST BFT migrate.

Every long range skipper has seen them when they are "not supposed to be there".

The biggest factor this coming "season", when there will be scores of boats hunting schools every day, is going to be BAIT. Without bringing out the ire of the flat earthers, who also deny global warming, I will suffice to say that the water is so frigg'in hot that bait is, and will be very hard to find. That means the game fish may have to go to other places in order to eat. I hope I am wrong, but if the water does not cool down next year it is going to spell disaster for the fishery.

OK science deniers...have at me...o_O
 
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uwhcmw76

i love asian spinners
Feb 8, 2014
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I thought in august they reopened the bft catch in Mexico, did it reclose after that?
 
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Tunahead

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MAJOR: "What do you think these folks hooked up at the lower 500 Gunny?"

GUNNY HIGHWAY: "Sounds fishy to me, must be OPAH????" LOL

Heartbreak-Ridge-12-300x168.jpg
 
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P

Paddyman1

Steve, I've stated in multiple posts on BD, that BFT are ALWAYS in So. CA/Northern Baja. They simply are not here in the numbers that are here during the Summer.

It is the lack of offshore charter and commercial fishing from October-May that keeps them from showing in news and fish reports, as well as the unfortunate fact that they are very few in numbers due to the fact that MOST BFT migrate.

Every long range skipper has seen them when they are "not supposed to be there".

The biggest factor this coming "season", when there will be scores of boats hunting schools every day, is going to be BAIT. Without bringing out the ire of the flat earthers, who also deny global warming, I will suffice to say that the water is so frigg'in hot that bait is, and will be very hard to find. That means the game fish may have to go to other places in order to eat. I hope I am wrong, but if the water does not cool down next year it is going to spell disaster for the fishery.

OK science deniers...have at me...o_O
I agree, Pete! Another thing people forget is warmer water means less or no kelp growth. And like you said, those fish will go elsewhere to eat cuz we can't feed them peanuts.
 
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Slice-Of-Life

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Jun 18, 2012
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Where can one find something saying BFT is still closed in baja beside just people on here? I though when they closed it last year it was for the remainder of the 2014 year due to the reaching there quota?
 
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KID CREOLE

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I agree, Pete! Another thing people forget is warmer water means less or no kelp growth. And like you said, those fish will go elsewhere to eat cuz we can't feed them peanuts.

However, warm water makes growing kelp weak and are more liklye to brake away from the coast and island with less wind and swell, you might see more kelps.
 
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Pgnracr

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1983 there was a handful of giants caught by commercial boats some up to 750 pounds. This happened near the channel Islands. The private boats got destroyed. The same year we were trolling 2 to 4 pound Yellowfin for 65 to 165 pound Big eye.file:
1991 we were catching 60 to 150 pound Bluefin in one day range
Yep I saw in 1983 a BFT commercial gutted and gilled it weighed 708 still. Several on same day in 500 range. All caught out behind Santa Cruz island. The few sport boats the China Clipper had one on a rock cod rod 300 lbs Dacron fought for long time but parted off at Bimini. Was sick. Epic times!!!! We can hope. Big eye are pretty scarce anymore. Sad. Great memories though.
 
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Hardcor

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Yep I saw in 1983 a BFT commercial gutted and gilled it weighed 708 still. Several on same day in 500 range. All caught out behind Santa Cruz island. The few sport boats the China Clipper had one on a rock cod rod 300 lbs Dacron fought for long time but parted off at Bimini. Was sick. Epic times!!!! We can hope. Big eye are pretty scarce anymore. Sad. Great memories though.
There are two kinds of Bluefin Tuna on our coast.

TUNA, SOUTHERN BLUEFIN
(Thunnus maccoyii)
tuna_southblue.png


(Castelnau, 1872); SCOMBRIDAE FAMILY; also called Japanese Central Pacific bluefin tuna

A species of the southern ocean found worldwide from 30?S to about 50?S latitude occurring in oceanic to coastal waters below thermoclines. Southern bluefin are commonly found off the southern and eastern coasts of Australia and New Zealand.

This pelagic and seasonally migratory species has been studied quite extensively in Australian waters due to its commercial importance. They spawn in the eastern Indian Ocean with one and two year old fish appearing off Western Australia in summer. Three and four year olds appear off Southern Australia in summer and New South Wales in winter. The migratory route from the Indian Ocean to the Pacific splits into two routes off southern Tasmania. Fish move either to northern New Zealand via South Island or up the Australian coast.

They closely resemble the Atlantic bluefin (Thunnus thynnus), and were once thought to be the same species. The difference is the number of gill rakers. The southern bluefin has a total of 31 40 on the first arch while the Atlantic bluefin has a total of 34 43. Both have in common striations on the ventral surface of the liver, short pectoral fins that do not reach to the interspace between the first and second dorsal fins, and moderate second dorsal and anal fins that are never elongated like those of the yellowfin tuna (T. albacares). The finlets are dusky yellow edged with black. It is the only species of Thunnus in which the caudal keels are bright yellow except in fish larger than 150 lb (68 kg) where the caudal keels tend to be darker.

They travel in schools of similar sized fish. Their diet consists of a variety of crustaceans, cephalopods, and fish including anchovies and pilchards.

The most popular method of catch this powerful, hard fighting fish is trolling. It can also be taken from boats or from the shore using live scombroid fishes (mackerels and little tunas) for bait. It is rarely taken on dead baits. Hooked fish are prone to fast surface runs and deep sounding.

They are excellent both as a sport fish and as table fare

Albacore

tuna_bigeye.png

Tuna, bigeye (Atlantic)
tuna_bigeye.png

Tuna, bigeye (Pacific)

tuna_blackfin.png

Tuna, blackfin
tuna_bluefin.png

Tuna, bluefin

tuna_longtail.png

Tuna, longtail
BWTuna_Pacblue.png

Tuna, Pacific bluefin

tuna_yellowfin.png

Tuna, yellowfin
header-go-fish.jpg

TUNA, PACIFIC BLUEFIN
(Thunnus orientalis)
BWTuna_Pacblue.png


(Temminck & Schlegel, 1844) ; SCOMBRIDAE FAMILY

Worldwide there are three species of bluefin tuna. Two of the species, the Pacific and southern bluefin were thought to be a subspecies of Atlantic bluefin (Thunnus thynnus) because of their similar appearance. Scientists also thought that Pacific bluefin were restricted to the northern hemisphere, but the old adage that the ocean has no fences appears to be true as there are more and more substantiated reports of Pacific bluefin making deep forays down under. In fact, the new millennium has seen impressive runs of Pacific bluefin off of New Zealand, and several All-Tackle records have been caught there recently, including the current record of 716 lb 8 oz. Oftentimes Pacific bluefin tuna may be distinguished from southern bluefin by the dark color of their caudal keels at the base of the tail. Southern bluefin tuna generally have a yellow or yellowish coloration on the caudal keel, but this may not be a 100% accurate means of differentiating between species. Because Pacific bluefin may be difficult to distinguish from southern bluefin, IGFA will require that a genetic analysis accompany the application for any Pacific bluefin caught in the southern hemisphere that weighs less than the current southern bluefin All-Tackle record of 348 lb.

Albacore

tuna_bigeye.png

Tuna, bigeye (Atlantic)
tuna_bigeye.png

Tuna, bigeye (Pacific)

tuna_blackfin.png

Tuna, blackfin
tuna_bluefin.png

Tuna, bluefin

tuna_longtail.png

Tuna, longtail
tuna_southblue.png

Tuna, southern bluefin

tuna_yellowfin.png

Tuna, yellowfin
 
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PCH

El Nino 2015!!!!!!
Jul 14, 2008
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I agree, Pete! Another thing people forget is warmer water means less or no kelp growth. And like you said, those fish will go elsewhere to eat cuz we can't feed them peanuts.[/QUOTE

Those fish will feed on red peanuts trust me. Have you seen the amount of red crab along our coast, out bays are even chocked full of them. Something is coming to feed on these red crab, and its not just yellowtail and rockfish.
 
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