Newbie to Lures-what should load it up with for SD fishing ?

Tuna-Sniper

Tuna Sniper
Oct 26, 2015
1,292
1,159
Inland Empire
Name
tom
Boat
2018 Parker 2320 SL
I have fished for couple years in San Diego but never got into using lures until last year using Coltsnipers and Flatfalls and got hooked. I dedicated two new 8' rod and reel setups just for lures this year and wondering what other lures should I get. I already got 8-160g Flatfalls and 9 coltsnipers and I hear the words Salas and Tady a lot but wondering if they do the same thing just different name and what size should I get ?

Thanks

Tom
 
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LEGENDS

Yogi Bear
May 7, 2011
1,174
321
Lakeside
Name
Sam
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None
Completely different lures than flat fall type jigs.. Tady and salas both make surface iron and yoyo jigs. Surface iron for top water action like when yellows are eating in the upper water column. Yoyo for when yellows are stuck to the bottom. Your flat falls and colt snipers have more a flutter action on the fall. You can also get into stickbaits and poppers.
 
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Tuna-Sniper

Tuna Sniper
Oct 26, 2015
1,292
1,159
Inland Empire
Name
tom
Boat
2018 Parker 2320 SL
Are surface iron lures the same as yoyo lures ?
 
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tanner.s

Fish Slaughterer
Oct 18, 2012
1,896
599
San Diego
Name
Tanner
Boat
1997 Proline 23 W/A
Surface irons look the same, very different though. Surface irons kick and are light. Yoyo irons just kind of wiggle or spin and are very heavy, usually more compact.

I would grab a few Salas 6x's for yoyo and Salas 7x/Tady 45 for surface. If you have a wad of cash burning a hole, go to Angler's Arsenal and buy a bunch of JRI irons, they are by far the best.
 
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Brad I

Common Sense Isn't Common Enough
Jun 20, 2015
1,795
2,236
San Fernando Valley
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Brad I
Boat
Nope
Surface irons can really work well at times, but it sure helps to be a good caster--you want to try to both reach a target in the distance and cover as much ground as possible so that fish have the greatest chance of seeing and eating the lure.

So most people have a specialized outfit for surface iron--a good casting reel (almost always a star drag, which are always single speed) and a longer rod (8 ft+) so they can fire off a long cast. This helps you get bit, but is a disadvantage compared to a shorter rod and 2 speed if you end up fighting a big fish, but its better to have difficulty fighting a larger fish than have no difficulty fighting no fish.

For yoyo, you want a reel that can retrieve line quickly (40" + per handle crank) as usually you want the lure to scoot by the fish quickly and have the fish bite more out of reaction to the lure than having the fish study the lure and decide whether to bite. There is no casting involved, so most angler use a 6-7 ft rod for this. I like using at least 100 yards topshot because winding spectra back onto the reel quickly is hard on my hands, and that way I also know when my lure is 100 yards down.

In both cases, it seems like most anglers use 40 or 50 pound line.
 
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tanner.s

Fish Slaughterer
Oct 18, 2012
1,896
599
San Diego
Name
Tanner
Boat
1997 Proline 23 W/A
I'd say don't bother with anything less than 50 on the yoyo. If you get bit a couple cranks off hard bottom, you're going to need to turn that head fast.
 
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