Newbie on a 14 day AA - what to bring?

Dexter Outdoors

Alex404

Newbie
Feb 3, 2017
20
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56
Germany
Name
Alexander
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None
Hi all, I am an Angler from Germany who loves to fish all over the world and found this forum by chance and hope you may be able to answer some of my questions.

A friend and I are planning to go on the 14day Accurate trip in Jan 2018 on the American Angler, hoping to catch a Yellowfin cow :-)


As we will be arriving by plane, our luggage is limited and of course I do not want to buy tackle/gear I will not need or can reuse. Therefore we plan to use loaner gear, if possible.

But now to the questions I have:


- I am a “lefty” do they provide left hand reels or do I need to buy it / rent it elsewhere? If yes, where?

- What about terminal tackle (rigs, sinkers, leaders, hooks, swivels, crimping stuff etc)? Will this be available on board?

- Reading this forum and watching Youtube videos, we will have plenty of fish. All we can take home are 50# each, what can I do with the rest?

- Are electrical outlets available on the AA. (for laptop, chargers etc) If yes what voltage?

- How much money in cash should I bring (loaner gear, tackle, drinks) or can you pay with credit card?

- How much is the expected average tipping for the crew?

- What personal items would you recommend to bring? (again I only have one suitcase of 50# to fill)

- How much meat do you get out of an e.g. 100# tuna?

Sorry for all these newbie questions, but I want to avoid being “that guy” who did not bring his…
 
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The Right Kind

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  • Jul 9, 2003
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    Hi all, I am an Angler from Germany who loves to fish all over the world and found this forum by chance and hope you may be able to answer some of my questions.

    A friend and I are planning to go on the 14day Accurate trip in Jan 2018 on the American Angler, hoping to catch a Yellowfin cow :-)


    As we will be arriving by plane, our luggage is limited and of course I do not want to buy tackle/gear I will not need or can reuse. Therefore we plan to use loaner gear, if possible.

    But now to the questions I have:


    - I am a “lefty” do they provide left hand reels or do I need to buy it / rent it elsewhere? If yes, where?
    You will be hard pressed to find left handed loaner reels, if you have 40-50# reels or heavier you should bring them.

    - What about terminal tackle (rigs, sinkers, leaders, hooks, swivels, crimping stuff etc)? Will this be available on board?
    All of this will be available on the boat and more. You'll find most people will be vary helpful and willing to share.

    - Reading this forum and watching Youtube videos, we will have plenty of fish. All we can take home are 50# each, what can I do with the rest?
    You can donate fish back at the landing or release them at the boat. You can take more than 50#'s home you just have to pay for it I believe.

    - Are electrical outlets available on the AA. (for laptop, chargers etc) If yes what voltage?
    All outlets will be 120v, you might want to bring a short extension cord with multiple outlets.

    - How much money in cash should I bring (loaner gear, tackle, drinks) or can you pay with credit card?
    Bring your CC, I believe you can pay for everything with it when you return to the dock but you should call Lori on that one.

    - How much is the expected average tipping for the crew?
    15-20% the cost of the trim is the norm.

    - What personal items would you recommend to bring? (again I only have one suitcase of 50# to fill)
    Sunscreen and a good book? your call

    - How much meat do you get out of an e.g. 100# tuna?

    Sorry for all these newbie questions, but I want to avoid being “that guy” who did not bring his…
    - I am a “lefty” do they provide left hand reels or do I need to buy it / rent it elsewhere? If yes, where?
    You will be hard pressed to find left handed loaner reels, if you have 40-50# reels or heavier you should bring them.

    - What about terminal tackle (rigs, sinkers, leaders, hooks, swivels, crimping stuff etc)? Will this be available on board?
    All of this will be available on the boat and more. You'll find most people will be very helpful and willing to share.

    - Reading this forum and watching Youtube videos, we will have plenty of fish. All we can take home are 50# each, what can I do with the rest?
    You can donate fish back at the landing or release them at the boat. You can take more than 50#'s home you just have to pay for it I believe.

    - Are electrical outlets available on the AA. (for laptop, chargers etc) If yes what voltage?
    All outlets will be 120v, you might want to bring a short extension cord with multiple outlets.

    - How much money in cash should I bring (loaner gear, tackle, drinks) or can you pay with credit card?
    Bring your CC, I believe you can pay for everything with it when you return to the dock but you should call Lori on that one.

    - How much is the expected average tipping for the crew?
    15-20% the cost of the trip is the norm.

    - What personal items would you recommend to bring? (again I only have one suitcase of 50# to fill)
    Sunscreen and a good book? your call

    I'm sure other will chime in with more info.
    I've fished with a couple brothers that come from France every year. They bring a lot of stuff!
    Good luck
     
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    tunacraze

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  • Nov 27, 2006
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    Alex,

    You are on a great boat and everyone from Lori in the office to the Captain and crew of the boat will bend over backwards to make yours the trip of a lifetime. Just call Lori in the office with any questions that are not answered clearly on here and they will do their best to accommodate you.
     
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    SouthBayKiller

    I Post A Lot But I Can't Edit This
    Mar 27, 2003
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    - I am a “lefty” do they provide left hand reels or do I need to buy it / rent it elsewhere? If yes, where? Probably not. Best chance would be the landing or if your trip is sponsored by a reel company you may be able to arrange something with the sponsor.

    - What about terminal tackle (rigs, sinkers, leaders, hooks, swivels, crimping stuff etc)? Will this be available on board?
    The landing is also a tackle shop, should be able to get most of what you need there. Also as other said most everything you need (and more) can be purchased on the boat.

    - Reading this forum and watching Youtube videos, we will have plenty of fish. All we can take home are 50# each, what can I do with the rest?

    You can donate it or just let it go.

    - Are electrical outlets available on the AA. (for laptop, chargers etc) If yes what voltage?

    Yes, plenty of them. All standard american plug style 110-120v.

    - How much money in cash should I bring (loaner gear, tackle, drinks) or can you pay with credit card? Check with the boat's office on that one, not sure what would be easiest for them or you.

    - How much is the expected average tipping for the crew? 15-20% of the trip cost.

    - What personal items would you recommend to bring? (again I only have one suitcase of 50# to fill) Standard toiletries that you probably are already traveling with. A mircro-fiber camping towel. Sunscreen. A good hat and good sunglasses. Rubber boots, all of this stuff is available here so unless you have it already its probably best to just buy it here.

    - How much meat do you get out of an e.g. 100# tuna? About 40-50lbs of cut meat.

    Sorry for all these newbie questions, but I want to avoid being “that guy” who did not bring his…The fact you are asking probably means you are already not that guy! Also searching on this board will come up with all kinds of other info.

    Really good read through is this thread with someone in a similar situation as yours:


    https://www.bdoutdoors.com/forums/t...-cool-cats-of-west-coast-fishing-lore.644996/

    And the result:

    https://www.bdoutdoors.com/forums/t...-cool-cats-of-west-coast-fishing-lore.644996/
     
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    FishRock

    Still trying to figure it all out
    Mar 27, 2013
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    I agree with all the feedback that Gary provided above with some additions.

    I would bring some cash. I generally bring $1,000 in cash for tipping the crew and some incidentals.

    As for personal gear you definitely need sun glasses, sun screen and a hat of some sort but you can buy all of that in San Diego if you are arriving a day ahead of your departure. X2 on a bringing a book or 2. 4 days of travel each direction.

    Your trip is the one before mine in January. Steve K. is on that trip and will likely help you out. Also call Lori at the AA office and ask her about loaner gear for left handers. I would bet Accurate would provide a couple of reels for you to use on the trip as they sponsor it. Call them too and ask if they would provide the reels on a loaner basis. From what I understand this would not be an unusual request. Worst thing they can do is say no.

    http://accuratefishing.com/

    Hope you have a great trip.
     
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    Steve K

    Hey, I'm gettin' bit...
    Jan 2, 2005
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    Hi all, I am an Angler from Germany who loves to fish all over the world and found this forum by chance and hope you may be able to answer some of my questions.

    A friend and I are planning to go on the 14day Accurate trip in Jan 2018 on the American Angler, hoping to catch a Yellowfin cow :-)


    As we will be arriving by plane, our luggage is limited and of course I do not want to buy tackle/gear I will not need or can reuse. Therefore we plan to use loaner gear, if possible.

    But now to the questions I have:


    - I am a “lefty” do they provide left hand reels or do I need to buy it / rent it elsewhere? If yes, where?

    - What about terminal tackle (rigs, sinkers, leaders, hooks, swivels, crimping stuff etc)? Will this be available on board?

    - Reading this forum and watching Youtube videos, we will have plenty of fish. All we can take home are 50# each, what can I do with the rest?

    - Are electrical outlets available on the AA. (for laptop, chargers etc) If yes what voltage?

    - How much money in cash should I bring (loaner gear, tackle, drinks) or can you pay with credit card?

    - How much is the expected average tipping for the crew?

    - What personal items would you recommend to bring? (again I only have one suitcase of 50# to fill)

    - How much meat do you get out of an e.g. 100# tuna?

    Sorry for all these newbie questions, but I want to avoid being “that guy” who did not bring his…

    I'm on this trip, have fished it five of seven times since 2011. Great bunch of guys, willing to help, share and offer advice. Crew of the American Angler is second to none and you'll really enjoy your time with them, especially the captain, Brian Kiyohara. I just fired off a couple of emails to Lori in the office (referred to as "The brains and glue of the operation" and to our chartermaster for the trip, Gary Teraoka, Pro Staff representative for Accurate as well as Calstar and Izorline. Should have answers soon regarding left handed reels.

    Regarding terminal tackle and leader material, all of that is available on the boat. If they run out, (doubtful) I'll have plenty as will the rest of the guys.

    Electrical outlets are available in every bunk as part of the reading lights. An ATM machine is available at H&M landing, adjacent to Point Loma Sportfishing. They accept ATM cards in the office, no fee. Feel free to begin and carry on an email exchange with Lori about anything. If she doesn't have an answer, she will find the answer and get back to you.

    Even though we'll be fishing in the middle of winter, it's quite tropical, warm enough for shorts, sandals and tee shirts. Latitude of Honolulu is three degrees north of Clarion Island. You might be able to pack enough in a carry on. I carry my personal belongings in a duffel, 12 x 12 x 22 inches.

    Yield on bigger tuna is around 45-50%. I turned four tuna, total weight about 525 lbs into enough to fill five 40 quart ice chests, about 250 pounds. There's a wonderful program: Fish Food Feel Good, a donation program through a Five Star Fish Processing Services. The end product goes to various charitable entities in the San Diego area for the cost of the processing.

    If email is more convenient, I'm at [email protected]
     
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    Mr GreenJeans

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    Aug 23, 2006
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    Regarding payment for the tip, tackle, and assorted beverages: settling up after the trip is usually done with cash or a personal check. A personal check drawn on a German bank is likely to be a problem. I have not heard of settling up with a credit card, so talk to Lori before the trip to see if that would be possible. Regarding the ATM at the landing, check and see what the daily withdrawal limit is. It might not be high enough to cover the $1,000 or so you will need to settle your tab.

    The fish processors are happy to take your credit card, so no problem there.
     
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    RichG

    I Should Upgrade My Account
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    Alex 404, welcome to a great addition. You have a lot of good info, above. Steve has already sent an email to the Charter Master (Gary) and Lori at the AA office. I don't know if Accurate brings or has left handed reels as loaners, but I bet they will find some. I know you have to pack light. Rubber boots can get heavy. An option would be two pairs of tennis shoes. One will always be wet when fishing but can dry out.

    It will be warm and shorts will work. Consider something you can wash and that drys fast. One pair of long pants and a jacket for the evening. I know guys that just bring old clothes and throw them away at the end of the trip. You will be riding 8 days (down and back) so you won't work up too much of a sweat on travel days, so you can probably can get away wear the same shirts, etc. for a few days, if you can personally stand it. Again if you can bring something that drys quickly, you can wash it. Just bring some soap.
    (look into back packing (hiking) clothes, just remember they might get bloody.)

    I wouldn't worry about tackle, etc. you should be able to get it on the boat or at the dock before you leave. And generally most passengers have too much and will loan you stuff. If I was going to buy anything at the dock, it would be hooks.

    Make arrangement with a fish processor before you leave. I would suggest you overnight in SD on the return so they can get it cut and frozen for your return flight.

    There are Super markets and Drug stores close to the landing that sell, sun screen, and personal items. Your CC should work. I generally tip closer to 20%, and that will dictate how much cash you need. But I am sure the boat will accommodate you.

    Keep asking questions, Welcome to our additions. It's a lot of fun.'
     
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    walkerman

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    Non-fishing stuff. A case of monster drinks for the crew. A case of red/white wine to SHARE at dinner. Some jerky to pass around during slow fishing times. A bottle of good scotch to share on a travel night. In other words, stuff to help you become one of the guys.
     
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    hucklongfin

    Deep release specialist
    Jul 3, 2003
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    I do 10 day trips and always end up with more fish than I need. I give the extra to other passengers. There's always someone who wants more. Except for Wahoo, I never have extra Wahoo! Actually, on my 1st 10 day I gave a Wahoo to the only guy on the boat who didn't catch one.
     
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    harddrive

    Wish I Was Fishing!
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    Welcome aboard. Like people are saying. I wouldn't worry about tackle and hooks and such. You can get that from the boat.

    What I would though is bring a couple of spools of 100 and 130 fluorocarbon leader. That stuff the boat sometimes runs out of. The rest, the boat will set you up and sell you what you need.
     
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    Alex404

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    Feb 3, 2017
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    Wowh, you guys are awesome. Thank you for your responses and support.

    I will definitely contact Lori and Sarah, but your answers already helped me in limiting my questions to sensible ones. A friend of mine is running a lodging & charter business in Alaska and I know these "first-timer" questions can get quite tiring.


    I think the left-hand gear will be my main challenge and I really appreciate your efforts Steve K to contact these people. Hopefully Gary & Accurate can help me out. I remember fighting a 350lbs Goliath Grouper with a right hand Reel. That was no fun. Although the water was shallow and it took only 15min, my arm was sore and I could barely turn the handle.


    Regarding the amount of fish... To be honest, If my first fish was a cow, I would stop. I would have more meat that I could carry and I would not want to kill these beautiful animals just for fun. Additionally I am more into filming and hope to get some good shots of the wildlife out there and a lot of fishing action. It is time that the AA gets some high quality videos on YT. ;-)


    Drinks. Thank you for putting this up. Should I bring soft-drinks or are they available onboard for a reasonable price? And does it make sense to bring my own, as I do not have a fridge? As to Alcohol, well I personally do not drink much, but I will bring a souvenir from the Duty-Free shop and look if I can get a case of Californian Chardonnay before we leave.


    There is one thing I am still not sure about. It is the "rail-fishing" technique. I am quite tall (6'9") and if I put the rod on the rail and have it under my arm, it would more or less point directly down to the fish... Wouldn't a belt/harness be more appropriate for me and then go with stand-up fishing?
     
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    Cubeye

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    All the above have provided a lot of good information. If you have additional questions, ask FishRock. He's from Alaska, and goes on the trip after yours. The only thing he brings on board is a small duffel bag with his personal gear. All the fishing gear is borrowed. Tackle rigging will be done by the crew if you want. All you have to do is pin a bait on and fish. If you prefer, the crew will even pin a bait on and cast it out for you. Easy Peasy Lemon Squeezy.

    FishRock makes it simple, and yes, he caught a Cow on his last trip.
     
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    Mr GreenJeans

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    Excellent questions raised. Here are my comments:

    Amount of fish - no need to stop fishing after you have caught your fill. You can catch and release; catch and give to a fellow angler; or, best of all, hook and hand to another angler who is down on his luck. This last option provides ample opportunity to take action pictures of "your" fish.

    Drinks - no need to bring soft drinks or bottled water. Both are available on the boat for $1 a bottle. In fact, some boats have a free soda fountain. Check with Lori to see if AA happens to have the free soda fountain. Also, the water from the tap is potable and safe to drink if you prefer. Regarding alcohol, even if you don't imbibe, bringing a few bottles of wine to share at dinner is a great way to make friends.

    Rail fishing - very few people do harness fishing any more. The boat won't have a loaner so you would have to buy one or maybe someone here on BD would loan you one. However, I have seen tall people successfully fish the rail. One technique is to straddle the rod butt and sit on it. The other technique is to drop to one knee while fighting the fish. The crew will happily coach you on proper technique.
     
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    FishRock

    Still trying to figure it all out
    Mar 27, 2013
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    There are a variety of soft drinks stocked in the common cooler. Just grab what you like and mark it on the sheet. They are $1 each and beer is also available as is bottled water. No free fountain but it is very reasonably priced. The water from the tap is from a reverse osmosis system and is as good if not better than any bottled water.

    I think you are right to assume that securing left hand gear is your main challenge but I also think with Steve's help that you are headed in the right direction.

    I am like you in that I don't want to kill what I won't be eating but you can ask the crew to release fish rather than landing them so I would not pass up the opportunity to fight a fish. Everyone is different and you learn a lot from each encounter. If it is a tough trip and there are not many fish being hooked you can also hook and hand a fish to a fellow angler who is not having much luck. This can happen to even the most seasoned angler. Bottom line is don't be too quick to sit it out. Your plan to do some filming is great. I am sure that everyone would be interested in the final product. You picked a good boat and from what I can tell a good group of anglers to join on your trip.

    Oh, regardless of what Kub may say I do tie on all my own hooks. And in preparation for my 5th LR trip next January I am purchasing a 100 lb. rig to bring along. So I will have my bag and a rod case to carry from the airport. Enjoy the coming months as you prepare for your trip. It is all part of the experience.
     
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    The Right Kind

    Slave to a Boat
  • Jul 9, 2003
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    Another option to releasing fish or handing off, ask a crew member if he wants a fish. They are out there all the time but they don't always get to bring home fish.
    You get to wind it in and they get to eat it. Win - win
     
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    RichG

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    Great questions. Many like the rail and going down on one knee or both will work, except for some of us "old farts" with arthritis. It's hard for me to get up and down so fast. However I am short enough to use the rail on the bow. A few years ago I was trying to use the rail and couldn't get enough leverage so I just used my harness. I usually wear a harness and a plate. If you want a harness, the boat might have one, so ask.

    Oh, if by very rare change, you are in a harness and get pulled over-board (very rare and never seen it happen). Just remember to put the reel in free spool and then unhook the reel. You'll pop up.

    As to number of fish. Mr. Green-Jeans is correct. You can catch and release or hand it off. As well as donate the fish. The galley always like fish for a nice meal. Just ask the Chef how much does he need. Who knows you get a nice fish early and then an even bigger one later. So I would not quit fishing, just slow down and pull on a few once you have enough and release or hand it off. I really don't need that much fish so I do that all the time. There is nothing better than a fresh fish meal on a long range boat.

    As to your point on the 350 pound grouper, if you are on the kite, which most likely is right hand reel, you can always ask the deck hand to crank for a while. They do this and help everyone who asks. So just ask.

    I don't know if the AA has a soda machine or just sells cans. But they usually have plenty, unless you are like "Soda Pop," and drinks a case of diet Coke daily. The boat water maker is a reverse osmosis and the water is better than any tap. So don't worry about the water. Save a water bottle and refill it, just put your name on it so no one throws away an empty. Or maybe someone can bring an extra water bottle to let you use since weight and space are a problem with international travel.

    Remember hydration and a good sports drink like Gatorade is good to bring.

    A case of wine is not necessary, just a few bottles will do, unless you are a big wine drinker. There is a store, "BevMo" down Rosecrans a few miles from the landing that has a great selection. Bevmo.com is their web site. They also have beer and other booze.

    As to ice. to keep drinks cool, just borrow a bucket from the boat and put ice in it. It works fine and most boats have a great ice maker.

    As you get closer to the date, if you can hook up with another passenger, with a car, the day before, maybe he'll take you around to gather stuff. Just have a list. You will go shopping.

    Oh, as a reminder, don't leave your stuff just laying around while in town or at the dock. Unfortunately, there are some individual that like to get things for free. It's not that bad but does happen on a regular basis. So if you have car, into the trunk or your hotel/motel room. The San Diego Airport is only a few miles from the landing and motels. So you really don't need a car for more than a few hours.

    There is this guy, Mike Morris who helps those travelers flying in and out of San Diego. Usually with tackle, etc. I don't know him but only what I have read and he appears to have a great following. You might want to contact him at bigfishtransort.com Look him up on BD, I know there has been a lot written about his services.

    Alex... you have now entered the "dark side." You opened a door to an addiction, San Diego Long Range Fishing. Most that responders to your thread would rather be fishing but for whatever reason are not at the moment and are bored so they have nothing better to do than give "advice." However, you will get some different opinion and must sort through them. I suggest you contact the other guy in Germany and chat about Customs, importing fish, etc. He'll have more ins and outs about the travel.

    Remember this is a recreational industry. The boats and crew are there to make you have a great vacation and want you to return. The boats compete with each other so they even work harder (most of the time). The passengers are for the most part a great group of people that are more than willing to help a newbie. Just be friendly and listen and learn. Occasionally there is "that guy" but not so much on the longer trips. If you work together, it becomes much more successful and enjoyable for all.

    Keep asking questions, you do have plenty of time. And welcome to our addiction.

    Rich
     
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    Bill W

    tunaholic
  • Jan 12, 2006
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    Regarding the amount of fish... To be honest, If my first fish was a cow, I would stop. I would have more meat that I could carry and I would not want to kill these beautiful animals just for fun. Additionally I am more into filming and hope to get some good shots of the wildlife out there and a lot of fishing action. It is time that the AA gets some high quality videos on YT. ;-)

    As far as yellowfin tuna over 200#, they are all males. Unlike ground fish that take a while to mature a yellowfin tuna rapidly grows to that size with food in the area being the main factor. So you are not really affecting the future populations by targeting the big males, which rely on younger tuna as a food source.

    Some fishermen donate their catch, some trade for canned tuna. No guilt....
     
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    pgangler

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    As far as yellowfin tuna over 200#, they are all males. Unlike ground fish that take a while to mature a yellowfin tuna rapidly grows to that size with food in the area being the main factor. So you are not really affecting the future populations by targeting the big males, which rely on younger tuna as a food source.

    Some fishermen donate their catch, some trade for canned tuna. No guilt....
    They are?? I didn't know that - I thought the larger fish in most species were females due to the energy requirements of creating eggs. Learn something new every day...

    Two things that are really unlikely to happen in one sentence: "If my first fish is a cow, I'll stop fishing" :appl::appl:

    I admire the ethics, but that will be a really hard promise to keep - and unnecessary since you can C&R with circle hooks.
     
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