New Lo-An bigger grade on day and a half

Discussion in 'Southern California Offshore Fishing Reports' started by bill lau, Apr 4, 2018.

  1. yessokk

    yessokk Well-Known "Member"

    Location:
    Costa Mesa, Cailf
    Name:
    Walt
    Boat:
    11 ft Sears W/Duel 5.2hp
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    Take a tape measure with you next time and tape out your tuna.
    With the tuna on the deck , at the fattest section of the fish, measure from the dorsal fin to the center of the belly then double that measurement. That will give you the circumference of the tuna. Square that number then multiply the product by the fork length, from the tip of the nose to the fork in the tail or the bottom of the " V " then divide that result by 800. This will give you a very accurate estimate of its weight.
    Circumference X Circumference X Fork length / 800 = Wt.

    As a suggestion, forget the Flat Falls to target tuna over 200 ft. deep. As a result of their very slow penetration of depth due to their side to side action on decent it is extremely difficult determine their actual depth. Use a center weighted or end weighted jig and use color metered spectra so you know for sure how deep you have gotten. This is very important. And becomes paramount when the targets are 350' deep. They can be caught at depth, you just have to get there and that can be a challenge . :)

    My thoughts for your consideration.
    Walt
     
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  2. Billy L

    Billy L Tuna, lobster, Alaskan Halibut killing specialist

    Location:
    San Diego and Homer AK
    Name:
    Billy
    Boat:
    25’, 22’, 15’ Whalers
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    Thanks Walt for the info. Do you have a link for the measurement so that I can favorite it, rather than a screen shot of your post to remember?
    In Alaska when I fish for Halibut, I use this link to get the weight from the length.
    https://www.piscatorialpursuits.com/halibutcharts.htm
     
  3. Let em eat 74

    Let em eat 74 Well-Known "Member"

    Location:
    Irvine
    Name:
    Kevin
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    Whichever1is leaving
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    The info you are looking for is in a sticky at the top of the page in this forum Bill.
     
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  4. Billy L

    Billy L Tuna, lobster, Alaskan Halibut killing specialist

    Location:
    San Diego and Homer AK
    Name:
    Billy
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    25’, 22’, 15’ Whalers
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    Got it. Thanks!
     
  5. fishsmith

    fishsmith Captain

    Location:
    murrieta/ca/usa
    Name:
    Jim
    Boat:
    21' Proline "MarLinz"
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    Physics, the Mother of all sciences. Still looking for the Father though!
     
  6. Fishmeluck

    Fishmeluck Fishing = Self-Medication

    Location:
    Long Beach
    Name:
    Paul
    Boat:
    Boat free, since July 2014.
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    Think of the butt of the rod as the hex-nut, your hands on the rod being part way up the handle of the wrench, and the fish pulling on the end of the rod as being even farther up the handle of the wrench. The angler and the fish are both pulling on the handle of the wrench, but the fish is pulling on the handle of the wrench farther from the hex-nut, so the fish has the mechanical advantage.

    Fighting belts were designed to offset that advantage by transferring much of the load to your body, so your arms don't have to carry it all. Then, the rail method came along to allow the rail and your body to carry much of the load instead of your arms.

    I'm old, have a bad back, and own two old but good condition 5.5 ft tuna rods, so this new, new method of pointing the rod at the fish and just pulling up a bit to get a slight angle in the rod and then reeling down interests me. The engineer in me suggests a lengthy mono topshot instead of straight spectra would be a good idea though. Because, without a nice bend in the rod to act as a shock absorber and to keep pressure on the fish, it would be important to have that stretch in the mono keep the pressure on.
     
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  7. tunastryker25

    tunastryker25 Member

    Location:
    OC
    Name:
    Kevin
    Boat:
    Triton 2486 WA
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    Situation awareness: adapt, adjust, and do whatever it takes to land the fish is my 2 cents...
     
  8. AndyJ

    AndyJ Well-Known "Member"

    Location:
    Dana Point CA
    Name:
    Andy Jakubas
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    18.5 Cobalt
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    This makes sense. I'd love to try it on a big fish.
     

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