eparsa

Newbie
May 6, 2020
11
0
Tracy
Name
Elyas Parsa
Boat
Radoncraft
Need some advice on how to proceed:

Bought a boat brand new with 250 hp yamaha outboard on Aluminum Stabicraft.
After 10 hours or so on the water noticed my batteries died off and noticed corrosion on the outboard lower unit and bottom of the boat when I was washing the boat off.

The dealer took it back and found that there was a short circuit due to a burr that had cut through the battery connection to the kicker engine.
According to them this should not cause any longterm issues to the engine. They are buffing the bottom of the boat and the cleaning off the minimal corrosion off the lower unit and giving it new paint.

I don't know enough about boats and engines to know if this is right or not!

As long as I will not have long-term issues I am ok with it, since the time on the water was relatively short. Would that be ok?

Thanks in advance for the advice.

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clevel

Skipper
  • Jun 4, 2011
    1,235
    1,049
    Laguna Niguel
    Name
    Cabo Jack
    Boat
    Cobia 261
    I would be concerned of a cosmetic fix for corrosion pitted metal. The pitting will grow larger over time and lead to a hole. Anybody experienced in a long term fix for this issue?

    I would want all the anodes in and on the engine checked and possibly replaced too!
     
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    Pacific Jigger

    You’ll never know unless you go
    Sep 16, 2019
    571
    1,446
    United States
    Name
    Bud
    Boat
    Formula 233
    I wouldn't let them get away with it. That's an incredible amount of corrosion for 10 hours, and it's coming through the paint and out of the seams on the outboard. Buffing? Forget it. If they won't strip and repaint the hull, and disassemble the lower unit to clean and repaint it, I'd make them buy the boat back.
    This wasn't an aluminum boat failure, this was a rigging failure that created a 'hot' boat, resulting in damage to your boat under normal conditions and use.
    It's on them. Completely.
     
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    ShadowX

    I Post A Lot But I Can't Edit This
    Oct 10, 2010
    2,507
    2,921
    Los Angeles
    Name
    Alex
    Boat
    None
    If is a brand new boat with a brand new outboard, I would return it.

    Who knows what other damages you don't see that is inside the engine and hull. It sure doesn't look like a boat that has been in the water for 10 hours only. I would be shocked if there wasn't more damage in your lower with all that corrosion showing between the cracks.

    Depending on the amp hours on your engine, discharging the battery over that relatively short period of time can cause a lot of damage in the long term. The damages are not cosmetic. Once you pierce through the paint on the motor, the corrosion is much worse under the paint and will keep growing. Even if you cleaned off the surface corrosion, the pinholes will allow the salt water to get in under the paint and continue to corrode. At the minimum, the engine paint needs to be stripped and repainted and the lower removed to assess additional damage.

    What is hard to tell is what part of your boat was the cathodic and the anodic site. Typically, you see the rust on the cathodic side. The real problem is actually on the anodic site where the pitting starts. It basically eats away at the metal. Normally, the zinc blocks are the most anodic parts of the engine and is used as the sacrificial metal so it doesn't erode away the engine. In your case, it might be different given the amount of corrosion you see coming out of the split section on your lower. The problem is that you don't know what is going on until you take the lower apart. It could be minor damage or it could be major damage.
    1623145096146.png


    Either way, I would walk away from this and you have a right. I wouldn't keep the boat if it was my boat. You should at least get a second opinion from a mechanic that you hire to look at potential damage. Don't trust their mechanics.

    I think they are just pulling a fast one over you. The usual, "it will buff right out..." Make sure you document everything and have it in writing or record it. You might end up in a lawsuit against them.
     
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    newmar

    Almost A Member
    Jun 10, 2005
    136
    26
    69
    spring valley
    Name
    bruce
    Boat
    23 blackman /Polkboat
    I think your concern is valid.At a minimum the yamaha original engine "paint" cannot be restored in the field. The pitting in the hull is permanent. Personally I would request a replacement of the entire package,minus trailer. the dealer can sell the boat as used and recoup most of their $. That is the only thing that will make you whole again.
     
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    ShadowX

    I Post A Lot But I Can't Edit This
    Oct 10, 2010
    2,507
    2,921
    Los Angeles
    Name
    Alex
    Boat
    None
    You see the yellow arrow? There is some major pitting in the outer edge of the zinc. In a electro chemical reaction the electrons tend to concentrate in areas with sharp corners or the closest to the the cathodic side of the reaction. In this case, you can see most of the damage are in the corners shown.

    In the lower right corner, you can see the red arrow. That zinc block is much closer to the the reaction side in your lower. For some reason, the lowers are more exposed. I think there might be some areas inside the lower that is not painted. Most likely, its on the surface where the lower mates to the main engine. Usually, those surfaces are not painted and has gaskets to seal the two halves. The unpainted surface is where the electrical current concentrates to form the corrosion.

    Since the lower zinc is closer to the cathodic side, you can see the corners eaten away almost 2-3X faster than the zinc with the yellow arrow. You can see an entire chunk eaten away in that corner.

    1623175970189.png


    The main problem is not with the surface rusting or the pitting. The actual problem is that inside the lower, there might not be a zinc block and the closest part would be eaten away. If you combine the amount of material that was eaten away by the two zinc blocks, there might be a part inside with the same amount of damage or more. You won't know until you drop that lower to have it be inspected.

    Another example is right in the picture in front of you. The zinc is the most anodic part so it should get the most damage. However, you can see the bolt connecting the zinc to the engine is also rusted. It tells you that not all the current is passing to the zinc. The current goes to the easiest path available to close the circuit.

    Your engine looks like it has more corrosion damage than some boats that has been in the water for 5 years. This is called accelerated wear. The problem is that it would only get worse and not better. Fixing the problem will only slow down the damage from this point. The damage that has already occurred can not be fixed unless the parts are replaced.

    If you plan to keep the boat, make sure you have it examined by a qualified mechanic you hired. Have them drop the lower with you and your mechanic present. Take photos of any damages you see. Have them replace all the damaged parts your mechanic find. Replace the zincs with new ones. Replace the bonding straps. Replace any bad parts in the lower or the entire lower.

    Check the location where the "short" happened. I bet you there were more damages there. The wires may also be damaged due to the short. The damages are inside the wire if it has overheated. There could also be damages to other wires tied to the same bundle of wires. Check how they repaired the "short". Make sure they didn't just splice or put a new shrink sleeve over the damaged area. Once that insulation on the wire is broken, its a source for water to get in and corrode the wires.

    Make sure they install rub rails or grommets on any locations where the wires are in contact with the aluminum hull to prevent this from happening. This is especially important if they drilled a hole to run the wires through. Over time, the vibration and rubbing would wear through the wire insulation.

    If their work in this location is shoddy, you need to inspect the rest of the boat for similar problems. If the same person did this to the motor, who knows what else he may have worked on in the boat. If you don't know how to do that, get someone who is a qualified electrician to check over everything.

    Good luck.
     
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    eparsa

    Newbie
    May 6, 2020
    11
    0
    Tracy
    Name
    Elyas Parsa
    Boat
    Radoncraft
    You see the yellow arrow? There is some major pitting in the outer edge of the zinc. In a electro chemical reaction the electrons tend to concentrate in areas with sharp corners or the closest to the the cathodic side of the reaction. In this case, you can see most of the damage are in the corners shown.

    In the lower right corner, you can see the red arrow. That zinc block is much closer to the the reaction side in your lower. For some reason, the lowers are more exposed. I think there might be some areas inside the lower that is not painted. Most likely, its on the surface where the lower mates to the main engine. Usually, those surfaces are not painted and has gaskets to seal the two halves. The unpainted surface is where the electrical current concentrates to form the corrosion.

    Since the lower zinc is closer to the cathodic side, you can see the corners eaten away almost 2-3X faster than the zinc with the yellow arrow. You can see an entire chunk eaten away in that corner.

    View attachment 1287823

    The main problem is not with the surface rusting or the pitting. The actual problem is that inside the lower, there might not be a zinc block and the closest part would be eaten away. If you combine the amount of material that was eaten away by the two zinc blocks, there might be a part inside with the same amount of damage or more. You won't know until you drop that lower to have it be inspected.

    Another example is right in the picture in front of you. The zinc is the most anodic part so it should get the most damage. However, you can see the bolt connecting the zinc to the engine is also rusted. It tells you that not all the current is passing to the zinc. The current goes to the easiest path available to close the circuit.

    Your engine looks like it has more corrosion damage than some boats that has been in the water for 5 years. This is called accelerated wear. The problem is that it would only get worse and not better. Fixing the problem will only slow down the damage from this point. The damage that has already occurred can not be fixed unless the parts are replaced.

    If you plan to keep the boat, make sure you have it examined by a qualified mechanic you hired. Have them drop the lower with you and your mechanic present. Take photos of any damages you see. Have them replace all the damaged parts your mechanic find. Replace the zincs with new ones. Replace the bonding straps. Replace any bad parts in the lower or the entire lower.

    Check the location where the "short" happened. I bet you there were more damages there. The wires may also be damaged due to the short. The damages are inside the wire if it has overheated. There could also be damages to other wires tied to the same bundle of wires. Check how they repaired the "short". Make sure they didn't just splice or put a new shrink sleeve over the damaged area. Once that insulation on the wire is broken, its a source for water to get in and corrode the wires.

    Make sure they install rub rails or grommets on any locations where the wires are in contact with the aluminum hull to prevent this from happening. This is especially important if they drilled a hole to run the wires through. Over time, the vibration and rubbing would wear through the wire insulation.

    If their work in this location is shoddy, you need to inspect the rest of the boat for similar problems. If the same person did this to the motor, who knows what else he may have worked on in the boat. If you don't know how to do that, get someone who is a qualified electrician to check over everything.

    Good luck.
    Thank you so much for the information. Will look into it.
     
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    Ozzie82

    Newbie
    Sep 15, 2015
    1
    0
    39
    San Diego
    Name
    Osborn
    Boat
    13' whaler
    Need some advice on how to proceed:

    Bought a boat brand new with 250 hp yamaha outboard on Aluminum Stabicraft.
    After 10 hours or so on the water noticed my batteries died off and noticed corrosion on the outboard lower unit and bottom of the boat when I was washing the boat off.

    The dealer took it back and found that there was a short circuit due to a burr that had cut through the battery connection to the kicker engine.
    According to them this should not cause any longterm issues to the engine. They are buffing the bottom of the boat and the cleaning off the minimal corrosion off the lower unit and giving it new paint.

    I don't know enough about boats and engines to know if this is right or not!

    As long as I will not have long-term issues I am ok with it, since the time on the water was relatively short. Would that be ok?

    Thanks in advance for the advice.

    View attachment 1287609

    View attachment 1287610

    View attachment 1287611
    What dealer did you get this boat from?
     
    Upvote 0

    Shewillbemine

    "should of" is NOT a thing
  • Oct 19, 2012
    2,679
    3,113
    California
    Name
    Shewillbemine
    Boat
    Chips N Guac
    I have owned 3 brand new boats.

    What your pictures are showing is not acceptable. I hope they can fix it for you.
     
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    Spoons

    USCG Master
    Oct 21, 2004
    1,474
    975
    San Diego/SF Bay
    Name
    Capt. Erik
    Boat
    21' Center Console
    That short circuit cooked that metal. They better be calling a welder to "add" material back on. Unacceptable. Ask for a new boat. 10 hours is damn near new but with that short to the hull and lower unit you have no idea what other hidden stuff has yet to make it self visible. Fuck that....
     
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