Nebraska Goes Long Range Fishing - 2019 15 day Intrepid Report

Soda Pop

I've posted enough I should edit this section
Feb 12, 2011
2,572
3,614
Fresno, CA
Name
David Rouse
Boat
Long range fishing
You know what Nebraska, I am sitting here thinking to myself, not only can that guy fish, but he can write so well, that it's like we were there with you! Waiting with baited breath for the next installment.
 

ZZZZZ

I've posted enough I should edit this section
Dec 11, 2003
7,314
7,656
.
Name
.
Boat
.
Sounds like your mentor is content and happily jaded in the big fish department. So feels better to give then to receive. Like Christmas morning

When I first started tow surfing. I never gave up a turn or offered to switch up with the driver/partner if I still needed another wave that counts. Not legal in California so I was in over froth at the beginning.

12 years later. Nothing stokes me out more then driving and placing my bros into a sick tube. After my buddy gets a mental tube and asks me if I want to switch up. I decline. Because I want to drive him into another tube

Tylenol pm before dinner. If no night fishing
 

Fishybuzz

fishybuzz
Apr 4, 2003
8,507
8,240
Tucson
Visit site
Name
David Tang
Boat
Intrepid
Some fish when you hook them you know deep down that it just isn't going happen....these magnificent animals are fighting for their lives....thanks Nebraska great writing....now you know what keeps us coming back for more.
 
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hilltop

lurking in the shallows
Jan 1, 2010
1,536
719
sb 805
Name
hilltop
Boat
sold, pangas, Intrepid, and diggin the RRIII
sheesh, after Fishy's above, I'm stifled and content with silence.........thank you.
 

reellady

I'd rather be catching TUNA
Aug 26, 2011
2,265
1,044
fresno, ca usa
Name
donna
Boat
reel lady
I was there with you on every swell of the boat, winding on the down and loosing again on the lift. Getting dizzy just holding my breath trying to reel that big boy in. Keep the saga going,
 
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tugasangler

I've posted enough I should edit this section
Apr 9, 2016
848
334
Virginia
Name
James
Boat
Yankee Capts
Some fish when you hook them you know deep down that it just isn't going happen....these magnificent animals are fighting for their lives....thanks Nebraska great writing....now you know what keeps us coming back for more.
Never a more true statement from a fisherman have I heard
 
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Nebraska

I've posted enough I should edit this section
Dec 20, 2016
135
937
45
Nebraska
Name
Craig Chamberlin
Boat
Intrepid
A new day and new friends

The morning starts at 4:15am and enjoy my morning routine of seasick pill and 3 advil with coffee and 1/2 and 1/2 (what a sinful treat on the boat in your coffee every morning) and a chocolate chip cookie for luck. Since we're on anchor, I go out and try and catch a skipjack for a big bait or anything willing to bite. I end up catching a 12 and a 20 pound yft. They are both too big to be a big bait and they are too small to be my future dinner so they are their freedom but it's fun to get bit a few times. I don't recall a single fish was tagged in gray light but recent reports from other boats had proclaimed it was primarily an afternoon bite only so I chalk it up to timing and enjoy a breakfast. Back at it, I get a few baits out and all of a sudden my line goes zip for .5 seconds and then slack. I reel in a cut off fluro with no hook and Wahoo scissor cut for evidence.

Now to set the stage, my beautiful bride before leaving pats me on the butt and tells me to have a bunch of fun catching Tuna but I better bring her home Wahoo again this year...it's her fav... so I smile and head up the side of the boat to #16 where my rods are and switch out to a wire leader bait hook setup.

I fish it hard for an hour. One fellow angler is on his 2nd day of tearing the Wahoo in on a live bait wire setup and he kindly tells me he is nose hooking his baits. In that hour I fish the wire at least 5 Wahoo come over the rail by different anglers. Some even catch them on 100 pound and get lucky and pin the fish in the corner of the mouth and never get cut off. A tuna comes over the rail for the first time today and I switch back to my 100 pound gear.

2 baits later...zip and I reel in scissored line and no hook. I laugh and switch back to wire.

I fish it for an hour hard. I even hold my wire and hook side by side to a very successful Wahoo whisperer on the boat and they are essentially identical. Giving me a little more confidence that I don't think I am missing too much I get to work. I fish it hard for an hour straight and watch a # of Wahoo come over the rail again by fellow anglers but I don't get a bite. Wahoo whisperer catches 3 Wahoo in this hour alone my notes remind me and I still don't have a bite. It's fishing and I'm fishing hard but sometimes you simply aren't the bait that gets bit. It's cool...I have a long trip ahead of me still but I would love to catch Mrs. Nebraska a Wahoo or 3. National Geographic alert! We watch a Wahoo out in the chum line leap at least 15 foot out of the water chasing bait and it effortlessly lands back in the water and disappears. So cool

I take a 45 minute nap after lunch in anticipation of the afternoon bite and it treats me very well. I think it is my first ever nap during 'fishing time' but it is a marathon and not a sprint. I spend the afternoon fishing wire with no luck until around 3pm when the tuna start to bite and I go back to my 100 pound gear for the rest of the evening.

I tag a 40 and a 50 pound yft to show for my efforts. They are an incredible eating size and we are still on frozen fish so I smile knowing they will come back to Nebraska frozen whole with me and I'll enjoy working them myself.

Another magnificent meal, shower and bed. The alarm goes off at 5am and I rise and head upstairs to reports of zero bites. The wind has really picked up and I am told it is 20-25 and will be so for the next 2 days. I enjoy a cup of coffee and watch the sunrise knowing that I will try hard again for Wahoo today. This boat is really rolling. Another angler has been having great success catching the Wahoo by throwing Raiders in assorted colors and he agrees to show me a few tips and tricks as it is my first time on anchor just targeting Wahoo with an iron. Up to the bow we go...cast out...let it sink for 30 seconds as I slowly walk towards the stern following my iron in the current... put it in gear and reel like a madman until my lure is about half way in and then he teaches me a little trick and that is to drop it back down for 30 seconds a second time per cast. I learn that if I bring it in too close to the boat before dropping it back down I am reeling it back in too vertically so I have to stop my retrieve midway so I have an angle to the 2nd effort. Back near the stern and the 2nd retrieve is in. Deep breath, brace myself against the rail and walk to the bow again.

Repeat
Repeat
Repeat

I get my first bite but it doesn't stick. I reeled through the bite but it is what it is. It encourages me to continue.

Repeat
Repeat
Repeat

I make over 50 trips to the bow over a 5 hour period. It is rolling enough I almost fall while casting and have to learn to time my cast with the roll so the weight is on my back foot while I cast so I am braced better. Frankly I am about getting wore out and I remember to stop and get a drink of water and take a union break on occasion but no tuna are coming over the side but I think over 25 Wahoo were caught for the day among different anglers with the usual suspects catching the bulk. After lunch, I am at it again and I get a bite and this time it sticks! I manage to keep the fish pegged and keep it hooked for over 5 minutes including multiple runs but unfortunately it comes unpegged during a run. Full pressure, rod bent and cranking...I was close, I even saw the fish once but dangit... its gone. The Raider master has 4 so far today and I am doing the same things so I just keep thinking that I am learning, I am having a blast doing it and my # will come.

My fellow Raider thrower and I keep encouraging each other on... it is frankly the most physically demanding grind I have done on a long range boat. We keep at it. At one point I am near the bow, walking my Raider towards the stern and I hear Raider master yelling my name. I reel in fast and head to the stern and he is hooked to his 5th Wahoo of the day and wants to hand it off to me. I tell him he doesn't have to do that and he tells me he has had his bites for the day and this one is my turn. We actually have a really funny 15 seconds as we exchange the rod and reel as I first take the rod while he is still grinding on the reel and then we wait for the fish to take a little line and I take over fully. Smack on the back and he is headed for a glass of water and I am headed for a freight train of fun! This fish is a blast and I end up going around the entire boat TWICE! But in the end I land my nicest Wahoo to date, over 50 pound fish. Super thick and even a little hump or shoulder if you will and not just a skinny. So cool and I let out some whoops of relief and excitement. I demand he is in the photo with me because although this fish is going to have my tag # on it, this is our fish and not mine. It's 3pm and I am exhausted from 9 hours of Wahoo iron fishing but I am so excited and relieved. I watch the fish slip into the RSW and go grab a celebratory beer. It must have been faulty as the damn thing was gone in moments but it tasted mighty fine. My kite # is up but the boat lets you fish if you want while a deckhand mans the kite rod so I flyline for the afternoon bite a catch a 40 pound yft for my efforts. At sunset the kite gets bit and a good friend happens to be siting upstairs enjoying a cold one. He does god's work and reels tight on the fish and the clicker sound turns to drag. Gill passes the rod down to Sam and I meet him in the port corner. Sam is winding to make sure everything stays tight and looks over and asks me... are you ready?
 

muledeer07

I've posted enough I should edit this section
Jun 30, 2008
208
105
USA
Name
Wade
Boat
None
I wake up in the morning praying that when I come to work Nebraska has added another read. Sir I hope you know how amazing your words are. I would read your articles every single day. Thank you.
 
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cchris

I've posted enough I should edit this section
Oct 2, 2014
423
222
35
Name
Cris
Boat
friends :)
That’s a beautiful wahoo, good job guys
 
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surfgoose

active geezer
Jul 29, 2010
2,853
4,131
Long Beach, CA, USA
Name
Gary
Boat
whichever has the longest bunk
The wahoo picture reveals all! You were wearing the wrong color shorts! Wahoo love green best with Raider jigs, I thought that you knew that. . .
 
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Anglewood

Up to no good...
Feb 16, 2012
1,249
1,076
Culver City, CA
Name
Connor
Boat
Intrepid, New Del Mar
I had a feeling that it was Stephen that you were talking about. He can always be counted on to kill it when wahoo fishing.

-Connor
 
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Soda Pop

I've posted enough I should edit this section
Feb 12, 2011
2,572
3,614
Fresno, CA
Name
David Rouse
Boat
Long range fishing
Another great read. Yep that guy knows them wahoo. I also picked his brain before. Keep it coming brother. Thanks for the professional reports
 
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Nebraska

I've posted enough I should edit this section
Dec 20, 2016
135
937
45
Nebraska
Name
Craig Chamberlin
Boat
Intrepid
That's One Big Fish

I grab the foregrip first as I slide in next to Sam and the fully take over the rod. The weight of these kite rods and sheer size of the larger reel make a cumbersome combo and I'm glad I don't have to flyline a sardine on this thing all day but I get a good grip and hold on. Now that we have come tight on the fish, it truly gets a sense of the hot mess it is in and takes a magnificent initial run. I even remember thinking the line was quite a long ways out to start with and now this fish is running away from the boat. I navigate over most of the anglers to the starboard corner and Jack comes up at my side. 'Doin good Nebraska, we got a big fish on here?' He pulls on the line a few pulls as I reel as all deck hands love to do. This is a big fish and I can feel the lunge as it changes directions and tries to spit the hook multiple times in the first few minutes. The fish takes another massive run and I begin to worry about if I have enough line on the reel but Jack assures me these massive reels have a ton of line on them and we are just fine...for now. The fish stays high in the water column and I begin to gain a little line as it changes direction and heads further towards my side instead of directly behind the boat. It is a false sense of confidence as I 'easily' gain line because of the angle change of the fish and as soon as the fish is about straight out the side of the boat it takes another massive run losing any line I may have gained. Violent head shakes and Jack calmly reminds to just smoothly reel through them so the fish can't spit the hook. I end up in practically a stand off for 20 or 30 minutes as I can't do much to the fish and he is out in the current changing directions, big rounds of head shakes... this fish is simply pissed. Eventually the fish begins to dive.I make a little slow gains while the fish goes below the boat and I see the beautiful slow tail beat as clear as day. This is not a butterball grade of fish and I actually get nervous for the first time of the fight. I've survived the first 45 minutes or so 'crazy' section of the fight and now I am straight up and down and I'm getting 1 step closer to having a chance at landing this fish. It becomes more real.

Another angler hooks the last fish of the evening as the bite is wrapping up with the darkness and he has a 40ish pound fish on. The angler hasn't touched many fish yet and is thrilled to be hooked up and frankly has absolutely the same right to fight and try and land his fish as I do but his fish comes to the starboard corner and is just below deep color and begins to wrap my fish up. Instantly 4 deck hands, multiple spotlights and a sense of urgency comes over the corner as I don't have the rod in my hand for the first time of the fight. Deck hands are trying to get these fish separated and asses the potential mess they have. I watch the deckhand put the reel in free spool and later tells me it helps bring the wraps to the surface for them to see which way the fish are tangled. My heart sinks and I fear the worst. Same scenario, same corner a year ago and I lost what would have been my first cow to getting wrapped up on another fish. To be standing back and watch that rod tip pop straight is the worst feeling in the world and I'm having flashbacks as I pace back n forth 5 feet from the corner. Out of nowhere, they separate the two fish, grab the other angler, take the smaller fish up towards the bow 10ish steps and help him lay the wood to his fish and bring it to the rail in just moments. The gentleman is thrilled to land his fish and now the rail is clear. I am still hooked up and have dodged a major bullet. This fish is still pinned. I re-acquire the rod and get back to work on my fish. This big wind moves even the stern of the boat enough that I can essentially pin the rod to the rail and let the swell and movement of the boat do most of the work and I just have to keep up with the line. I catch Jack stopping me just a half a crank short of everything I could get on the way down and he tells me we have the fish coming up slowly and smoothly and this will prevent a herky jerky pressure on the fish so I just watch my rod tip and listen to his voice as we take each and every single swell as it's own moment in time. Miraculously, nothing on me hurts. I am still breathing through my nose, I am comfortable with my elbow on the rail in the corner and I don't have an angler within 5 yards of me as many folks are already freshening up for supper. We keep making steady gains minus a few angle changes but this fish slowly just keeps corksrewing up in the starboard corner. I make it to deep color and I get butterflies as I look over the rail at the fish. It almost seems taboo sometimes to my brain but it makes my heart skip a beat. One deckhand is running a spotlight, another has a Y out as these circles are taking me near the hull now. Another stands by with the first gaff and all along Jack is just right by my side. It gets harder and harder as the angle change on the line becomes more severe as the fish gets closer but out of nowhere I hear Sam say 'one more time around and I am going to need you to lift hard'... the fish comes near the surface, scoops out wide, tries to dive again and I hear the magic words. LIFT! I recall bending my knees and raring back on the rod as hard as I can and then it happens...they stick this beautiful fish and I go to free spool.

Oh my god is this fish beautiful. 182 pounds and the new biggest fish of my life. It's stunning. Massive. As long as I am tall. It even has a decent sickle to it and I look at this massive fish on the deck in the synthetic bring light of the deck. A big hug and high five for Jack. Then high fives all around.

I remember Captain Bill telling one of the deck hands to grab the fish cone and he is going to go grab the camera. I'm going to make the Intrepid Website. All these years... for years now I have been seeing facebook posts of these beautiful fish on the Intrepid page and hitting the like button and thinking god, I would love to catch one of those fish...and now I have. I know it isn't a cow but frankly that is even cooler. My old pb was 154 and this fish whoops that things butt. Even better that I get to savor another milestone hopefully in the future. Jack gets the fish's nose in the cone and stands it up. They hose the fish off so it has a beautiful clean appearance and even the deck below the fish. I come in to the side of Jack and grab a piece of this magnificent creature. Bill snaps a few pictures and my mentor has me turn and he snaps a few as well. Jack manages to return the fish horizontal without breaking himself in the process and a gill and gut ensues. Some more high fives and hugs and the fish slips into the RSW. I just stand there leaning against the rail in awe. I eventually realize I never even took a picture of the fish with my own phone. I was simply in the moment...my moment... and it was rad. God I love this shit.

We head inside and many are already eating their salad but god forbid I miss a meal :) and I manage to find a spot and a glass of red and enjoy a meal. Heading downstairs for a shower and only then does the adrenaline start to wear off as I grab the rail to go down the steps and I realize my thumb, my left hand and a few other parts of my body were a little surprised by my day but I assure them some more advil and a chocolate chip cookie for luck in the morning, and they will be all better.