Nados, Yellos, beached boat and an IMPORTANT LESSON

Zululander

Member
Jul 28, 2006
216
67
28
44
Clairmont
Name
Andrew
Boat
Grady White Custom 22
Spent the day fishing the Coronado's on Saturday. We caught a few and lost too many to both stupidity and Sea Lions. Better than some, not as good as others....

At around 2 pm we heard a mayday call come over the radio and were first on the scene. Essentially these guys lost their bilge pump and by the time they realized it, it was too late. They started taking on water and ended beaching their boat in the cove at the middle islands.

We gave them a spare bilge pump and a manual pump and they tried everything they could to get the water out. Unfortunately the wave action destroyed their hull and the boat was deemed no longer seaworthy. A few of us swam out to the boat to try and help them but the minute we got to shore and based on all the bits of fiberglass on the beach it was apparent that this was now a salvage operation. We called the coast guard and they advised us that they will inform the Mexican authorities. In the end we brought the fishermen back to San Diego with as much gear as they could get off the boat. They were super grateful and were happy to be safe. This could have been much much worse. Imagine this happening at the 302 with no one around?

A $50 part cost them a boat worth thousands... thank goodness for insurance...

I have a few things to say as it relates to Bilge Pumps....:

1) Never, never, never rely on 1 bilge pump. The proper way to do it is to have 1 main bilge that you check before each trip. You should at least install a second pump positioned two inches higher, this pump should also be connected to a water alarm, so if it goes off you know there is an issue. Personally I have three plus a spare.

2) Always carry a spare pump, in fact I keep a pump with its own wire, and hose. If there is an issue I can connect it straight to the battery and I don't need to worry about faulty wiring.

3) Always carry a manual pump and buckets just in case things are really bad...

4) I honestly don't understand the open transom boats. To me this is a huge safety issue. Every boat that I have owned I have either enclosed the transom or at least filled in most of the gap with fiberglass plate.

At the end of the day, we need to be very aware of safety. You probably should also consult with an expert on this. Water safety needs to be everyone's priority.

I am sure there will be many opinions on this so have at it.

IMG_8387.jpg
 

HookEmDanO

Huhuhuge member
Jan 31, 2004
553
618
93
San Diego
Name
Dan
Boat
1997 Trophy 2352
I have 4 bilge pumps ready at all times....that water IS too damn cold for me !

plus a manual pump, plus buckets
 
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Paddyman1

A mossback is better than a hairy back
Nov 7, 2010
5,481
3,995
113
La Costa Izquierda
Name
Steve
Boat
N/A
Damn that is a nice sled to lose over $50 crackers!

Good on you Andrew for doing what you could. Lives before materials.
 
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Sdchronix

Alpine Beer Fishing Team
Jul 26, 2018
441
555
93
29
San diego
Name
Anthony C.
Boat
Hooked Up Boat Club - Parker 2320
I thought I saw a beached boat out there Sunday. Guess so.
 

ranchero

fishing-pox..?I have fishing plauge
Apr 29, 2004
857
87
28
SD
Name
Al
Boat
25 skipjack -Albatross
Thanks for the report. Went out friday and yesterday. So frustrated! Had our chances on soaks and slow troll. Few chance we had resulted in getting rocked- and chaffed/broken 30lb floro. The soaks- so many light nautilus 2/0 turn into the nose hooked sardine. Maybe that hook was too big??? Killin me. Yesterday sun sucked! We just moved around all over metering red crabs slow trolling, yoyo oeange/red salas 6x for nada.

Great job getting on the maday. Everyone needs to be ready for that call. I have been on that end before- not fun!

Most important thing is they thought quick and there were no major mishaps after the reaction to the issue. Seems to me- the first thing to go wrong is just the first... Glad everyone is OK. Don't think they need to beat themselves up. This sort of thing can happen to anyone on any size boat!

My learn- always always - inspect all through hulls regularly and make sure they are all grounded to prevent them from degrading faster. Also- inspect any hoses or anything that can prevent a float switch from working. Especially any hose going back to a thru hull- that was my potential killer

Was looking at my bilge pumps sat. I have 3 bilge pumps on the boat but this post will definitely have me looking into changing 2 of them out.

I also carry a large pump with quick connect spade connectors to battery clamps. The pump has 14ft large blue bildge discharge hose to run out a boat in a pinch. This set up is easy for a hand off

Other important stuff:
- A high water alarm- in case there's a pump malfunction - This is CRITICAL and a to-do on my boat for 6 years now.

- Wood tapered plugs. Just go get some.

That bag of plugs literally saved my life!
 

MYNomad

Heading South
Dec 12, 2007
3,201
2,697
113
Pacific Northwest / West Coast Mexico
Name
Rick
Boat
Yes
I will add to your suggestions:
1. Install and monitor a bilge cycle counter. This will help you spot any situation causing excessive water to enter the bilge, even if the pump is keeping up with it.
2. Install a "high water" alarm. This will let you know that the pump is not keeping up with the water. Absent an alarm, you won't know until there is so much water in the bilge that either handling is adversely affected, or equipment begins to malfunction due to water exposure (ie, batteries under water).

The high-water alarm should be set to come on whenever there is more water than normal. (And, IMO, offshore boats should be self-bailing, so there shouldn't normally be any water in the bilge.)
 

Zululander

Member
Jul 28, 2006
216
67
28
44
Clairmont
Name
Andrew
Boat
Grady White Custom 22
yup, on my last boat I had a high water alarm. This time around I have a high water alarm and it is also connected to a pump, so if the alarm goes off, my back up bilge is also working on the problem.
 
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aquasport18

aquasport18
Jul 30, 2012
656
361
63
san diego ca 92117
Name
the brusier
Boat
21 ft stealh vip cc.
The cold water isint so much the fear for me of goin down . Its whats in the water that scares the shit out of me imagine goin down 5 10 miles offshore at night black waters , doubt if you would live through the night. I also have 2 bilge pumps and an extra one rigged and ready . sharkbait.
 
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wils

lazy-ass well known "member"
May 31, 2003
8,858
4,970
113
not a spoiled bitch from san diego
Name
bill
Boat
I hate boats
The proper way to do it is to have 1 main bilge that you check before each trip.
Don't just turn it on and listen. Put it in a bucket or put in the plug and fill the bilge until the pump is submerged. Then test it. All it takes is one leaf stuck on the bottom of the pump where you cant see it to ruin your day.
 
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PacificPredator

Captain
Dec 9, 2010
705
190
43
LBC
Name
Brad
Boat
29' Phoenix Sportfisher

Spotfire13

Newbie
Jul 18, 2017
1
6
3
61
Oceanside ca
Name
Pat
Boat
Searay
Spent the day fishing the Coronado's on Saturday. We caught a few and lost too many to both stupidity and Sea Lions. Better than some, not as good as others....

At around 2 pm we heard a mayday call come over the radio and were first on the scene. Essentially these guys lost their bilge pump and by the time they realized it, it was too late. They started taking on water and ended beaching their boat in the cove at the middle islands.

We gave them a spare bilge pump and a manual pump and they tried everything they could to get the water out. Unfortunately the wave action destroyed their hull and the boat was deemed no longer seaworthy. A few of us swam out to the boat to try and help them but the minute we got to shore and based on all the bits of fiberglass on the beach it was apparent that this was now a salvage operation. We called the coast guard and they advised us that they will inform the Mexican authorities. In the end we brought the fishermen back to San Diego with as much gear as they could get off the boat. They were super grateful and were happy to be safe. This could have been much much worse. Imagine this happening at the 302 with no one around?

A $50 part cost them a boat worth thousands... thank goodness for insurance...

I have a few things to say as it relates to Bilge Pumps....:

1) Never, never, never rely on 1 bilge pump. The proper way to do it is to have 1 main bilge that you check before each trip. You should at least install a second pump positioned two inches higher, this pump should also be connected to a water alarm, so if it goes off you know there is an issue. Personally I have three plus a spare.

2) Always carry a spare pump, in fact I keep a pump with its own wire, and hose. If there is an issue I can connect it straight to the battery and I don't need to worry about faulty wiring.

3) Always carry a manual pump and buckets just in case things are really bad...

4) I honestly don't understand the open transom boats. To me this is a huge safety issue. Every boat that I have owned I have either enclosed the transom or at least filled in most of the gap with fiberglass plate.

At the end of the day, we need to be very aware of safety. You probably should also consult with an expert on this. Water safety needs to be everyone's priority.

I am sure there will be many opinions on this so have at it.

View attachment 1052164
The cold water isint so much the fear for me of goin down . Its whats in the water that scares the shit out of me imagine goin down 5 10 miles offshore at night black waters , doubt if you would live through the night. I also have 2 bilge pumps and an extra one rigged and ready . sharkbait.
Spent the day fishing the Coronado's on Saturday. We caught a few and lost too many to both stupidity and Sea Lions. Better than some, not as good as others....

At around 2 pm we heard a mayday call come over the radio and were first on the scene. Essentially these guys lost their bilge pump and by the time they realized it, it was too late. They started taking on water and ended beaching their boat in the cove at the middle islands.

We gave them a spare bilge pump and a manual pump and they tried everything they could to get the water out. Unfortunately the wave action destroyed their hull and the boat was deemed no longer seaworthy. A few of us swam out to the boat to try and help them but the minute we got to shore and based on all the bits of fiberglass on the beach it was apparent that this was now a salvage operation. We called the coast guard and they advised us that they will inform the Mexican authorities. In the end we brought the fishermen back to San Diego with as much gear as they could get off the boat. They were super grateful and were happy to be safe. This could have been much much worse. Imagine this happening at the 302 with no one around?

A $50 part cost them a boat worth thousands... thank goodness for insurance...

I have a few things to say as it relates to Bilge Pumps....:

1) Never, never, never rely on 1 bilge pump. The proper way to do it is to have 1 main bilge that you check before each trip. You should at least install a second pump positioned two inches higher, this pump should also be connected to a water alarm, so if it goes off you know there is an issue. Personally I have three plus a spare.

2) Always carry a spare pump, in fact I keep a pump with its own wire, and hose. If there is an issue I can connect it straight to the battery and I don't need to worry about faulty wiring.

3) Always carry a manual pump and buckets just in case things are really bad...

4) I honestly don't understand the open transom boats. To me this is a huge safety issue. Every boat that I have owned I have either enclosed the transom or at least filled in most of the gap with fiberglass plate.

At the end of the day, we need to be very aware of safety. You probably should also consult with an expert on this. Water safety needs to be everyone's priority.

I am sure there will be many opinions on this so have at it.

View attachment 1052164
I was also out there on Saturday and heard the frustration with your communication to Sea Tow . You should be commended Captain for responding to help them . Their situation could have been a lot worse if they had not beached it . The islands are not a forgiving place to be at if things go bad . I currently don’t have a spare bilge for emergencies . But Amazon will take care of that . I have two bilge pumps on boat but a spare seems like a no brainer . I will rig it so I can attach to batteries in an emergency . It’s good to know there are Captains like yourself who will help another boater . I know it took you away from fishing for awhile and that you also returned them to Shelter Island . Hopefully they take you out to dinner or buy you a case of beer for you next trip !! Good job