Mono vs Fluoro Equivalence for BFT chew leaders

fakeruben

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I've read several threads discussing the use of heavy mono and fluorocarbon for chew leaders while using flat falls or sinker rigs for Bluefin. Are there any approximate apples to apples comparison for equivalent abrasion/chew resistance?

For example, "300# mono is about as good as _____# fluoro" in keeping a tuna from biting you off?

If fluoro is that much more resistant, there shouldn't be a need to go as heavy strength as mono, correct? For those fishing fluoro, how heavy are you going?
 

BluefinCurly

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I personally wouldn't consider mono for a bite leader.
FF fishing 130 to 200 Flouro and the Yo Zuri seems to have a harder surface.

Sinker rigs are different because you are presenting bait. 80 flouro in the gray, and perhaps 60# daytime, but you have a better chance of a corner hookset, whereas with the FF they inhale the whole thing.
 
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Mr. DRE

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    When rigging my jigs I considered buying flouro but hot damn it got expensive quick to rig up all my jigs. I stuck with heavy mono and as of yet none have failed (3 for 3). Re-rigging was necessary after each fish was landed though.
     
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    fakeruben

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    When rigging my jigs I considered buying flouro but hot damn it got expensive quick to rig up all my jigs. I stuck with heavy mono and as of yet none have failed (3 for 3). Re-rigging was necessary after each fish was landed though.

    Same thought consideration. The price of fluoro starts jumping up considerably the higher strength you go up. I have to infer there's no need to jump up to 300# pound flouro in the example I used.

    Just trying to figure out what the (relatively) safe range of fluoro for up to 200# fish might be.
     
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    fakeruben

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    I personally wouldn't consider mono for a bite leader.
    FF fishing 130 to 200 Flouro and the Yo Zuri seems to have a harder surface.

    Sinker rigs are different because you are presenting bait. 80 flouro in the gray, and perhaps 60# daytime, but you have a better chance of a corner hookset, whereas with the FF they inhale the whole thing.

    Any rhyme or reason to when you personally move up and down from 130-200# flouro for your leaders?
     
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    BluefinCurly

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    Any rhyme or reason to when you personally move up and down from 130-200# flouro for your leaders?
    Jig size
    If you are fishing a lighter jig, the heavier leader affects its flutter
     
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    woodfish330
    Wise anglers have learned that this "result" can be used a certain times to an anglers advantage.... depending on conditions.....
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    Brad I

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    Any rhyme or reason to when you personally move up and down from 130-200# flouro for your leaders?
    At night I usually fish heavier leaders just because they're less visible at night and more protective anytime. If you like to re-rig, some jigs might be fished anytime, but lumo jigs are usually fished at night.
     
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    For example, "300# mono is about as good as _____# fluoro" in keeping a tuna from biting you off?

    If fluoro is that much more resistant, there shouldn't be a need to go as heavy strength as mono, correct? For those fishing fluoro, how heavy are you going?

    My two cents, and is only an opinion, as I too have wondered about this...

    For this situation, I think it's like many things in fishing, where the "best answer for the moment" is to go with what you are comfortable with, as a black and white or even a general guideline type answer is moot.

    You'll have people claim one vs. the other based upon their own experiences/observations and defend the position based upon successes and failures. Many times, there are a lot of other variables that are overlooked, which would refute the conclusion, but no need to piss in someone's Cheerios.

    Another way to approach this is objective measurements. This is "a way", but not always necessarily, the "right way". I feel it's situation specific, where sometimes it is, and sometimes it "could be". This approach has the advantages of controlling a specific set of variables to minimize variances resulting in repeatable and objective results. However, it fails to take into account variables that may factor in (ie: fish behavior, or other dependencies like a poor knot connection), which could lead to erroneous conclusions about the overall objective.

    Perhaps that's why I've not seen too much information about the pros/cons of mono vs flouro as it pertains to abrasion resistance. The ones I've seen seem to suggest at some point, (ie: 200lb+ test ) you get to a point of diminishing returns and it doesn't matter. If that's the case, and it makes you sleep OK at night, then for sure, go with mono, as it is cheaper as mentioned by the skipper of the Searcher.

    REF: S. Carson's Tackle Talk Live
    Forward to 1:03:20.

    Finally, the comment from another user that uses mono and about re-rigging after each fish landed. I agree here, that I'd check out the line after each fish. But I wouldn't say if using flouro, you wouldn't have to re-rig after each fish or the frequency would be less because one is using flouro. This to me, suggests it doesn't really matter at some point of diminishing returns.
     

    IronMikeAC

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    I've read several threads discussing the use of heavy mono and fluorocarbon for chew leaders while using flat falls or sinker rigs for Bluefin. Are there any approximate apples to apples comparison for equivalent abrasion/chew resistance?

    For example, "300# mono is about as good as _____# fluoro" in keeping a tuna from biting you off?

    If fluoro is that much more resistant, there shouldn't be a need to go as heavy strength as mono, correct? For those fishing fluoro, how heavy are you going?
    I have successfully used 200lb mono which is inexpensive, and 130lb fluoro for 200lb BFT. I see them as equivalent.
     

    fakeruben

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    Jig size
    If you are fishing a lighter jig, the heavier leader affects its flutter

    See that's another reason I was working through this thought process. Do I just buy a bulk spool of 200# fluoro/300# mono as a catchall and call it a day? Or should I buy a variety of ratings and work up and down the ladder based on conditions?

    Jig size is one of those conditions, I guess.
     
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    fakeruben

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    My two cents, and is only an opinion, as I too have wondered about this...

    For this situation, I think it's like many things in fishing, where the "best answer for the moment" is to go with what you are comfortable with, as a black and white or even a general guideline type answer is moot.

    You'll have people claim one vs. the other based upon their own experiences/observations and defend the position based upon successes and failures. Many times, there are a lot of other variables that are overlooked, which would refute the conclusion, but no need to piss in someone's Cheerios.

    Another way to approach this is objective measurements. This is "a way", but not always necessarily, the "right way". I feel it's situation specific, where sometimes it is, and sometimes it "could be". This approach has the advantages of controlling a specific set of variables to minimize variances resulting in repeatable and objective results. However, it fails to take into account variables that may factor in (ie: fish behavior, or other dependencies like a poor knot connection), which could lead to erroneous conclusions about the overall objective.

    Perhaps that's why I've not seen too much information about the pros/cons of mono vs flouro as it pertains to abrasion resistance. The ones I've seen seem to suggest at some point, (ie: 200lb+ test ) you get to a point of diminishing returns and it doesn't matter. If that's the case, and it makes you sleep OK at night, then for sure, go with mono, as it is cheaper as mentioned by the skipper of the Searcher.

    REF: S. Carson's Tackle Talk Live
    Forward to 1:03:20.

    Finally, the comment from another user that uses mono and about re-rigging after each fish landed. I agree here, that I'd check out the line after each fish. But I wouldn't say if using flouro, you wouldn't have to re-rig after each fish or the frequency would be less because one is using flouro. This to me, suggests it doesn't really matter at some point of diminishing returns.

    Mainly I'm looking to at least be lobbed in the right direction, as anything above 50# leaders is new for me. A good foundation to at least start from. I don't want to be THAT guy on the boat, you know?

    Thank you for the video, if the captain says 200-300# mono is good, who am I to disagree?
     
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    woodfish330

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    My two cents, and is only an opinion, as I too have wondered about this...

    For this situation, I think it's like many things in fishing, where the "best answer for the moment" is to go with what you are comfortable with, as a black and white or even a general guideline type answer is moot.

    You'll have people claim one vs. the other based upon their own experiences/observations and defend the position based upon successes and failures. Many times, there are a lot of other variables that are overlooked, which would refute the conclusion, but no need to piss in someone's Cheerios.

    Another way to approach this is objective measurements. This is "a way", but not always necessarily, the "right way". I feel it's situation specific, where sometimes it is, and sometimes it "could be". This approach has the advantages of controlling a specific set of variables to minimize variances resulting in repeatable and objective results. However, it fails to take into account variables that may factor in (ie: fish behavior, or other dependencies like a poor knot connection), which could lead to erroneous conclusions about the overall objective.

    Perhaps that's why I've not seen too much information about the pros/cons of mono vs flouro as it pertains to abrasion resistance. The ones I've seen seem to suggest at some point, (ie: 200lb+ test ) you get to a point of diminishing returns and it doesn't matter. If that's the case, and it makes you sleep OK at night, then for sure, go with mono, as it is cheaper as mentioned by the skipper of the Searcher.

    REF: S. Carson's Tackle Talk Live
    Forward to 1:03:20.

    Finally, the comment from another user that uses mono and about re-rigging after each fish landed. I agree here, that I'd check out the line after each fish. But I wouldn't say if using flouro, you wouldn't have to re-rig after each fish or the frequency would be less because one is using flouro. This to me, suggests it doesn't really matter at some point of diminishing returns.
    Very well stated brother.
     
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    nicodemus

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    "...lobbed in the right direction..."

    Gotta say, I love that phrasing!

    I'm still new to most things long range, or BF out of SD in the last few years (but I'd listen to IronMike's thoughts above...)

    I'm budget conscious, the one LR trip I take annually pretty much taps me out financially. So things like the cost of a reel that can handle a cow tuna, or the one rod to pair it with, or the best bang for your buck... I pay attention to these things.

    I landed my biggest fish ever last year, a 167 lb. bluefin - modest by many accounts - on a flat fall with a #200 fluoro leader. My fishing buddy had a cow-size fish in gaff range, it chewed through his #130 fluoro and...

    My point being, if it's a matter or 30, 40 or $50, don't let that one most important component be the difference between bucket and budget...
     
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    BluefinCurly

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    Mainly I'm looking to at least be lobbed in the right direction, as anything above 50# leaders is new for me. A good foundation to at least start from. I don't want to be THAT guy on the boat, you know?

    Thank you for the video, if the captain says 200-300# mono is good, who am I to disagree?

    If you are in SD, Rick Maxa recently said they make up and sell flouro bite leaders at Fisherman's Hardware because most guys don' want or need to drop a benji on a coil.

    That might be your huckleberry.
     

    fakeruben

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    Several videos on youtube regarding this subject. Thought this one was interesting.


    Interesting. I've been thinking about how one could conduct the most accurate test. Obviously sandpaper =/= teeth.

    The thought's crossed my mind to save a jaw from the next catch and rake the teeth over taut mono/flouro and observe the results.
     
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    IronMikeAC

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    I've read several threads discussing the use of heavy mono and fluorocarbon for chew leaders while using flat falls or sinker rigs for Bluefin. Are there any approximate apples to apples comparison for equivalent abrasion/chew resistance?

    For example, "300# mono is about as good as _____# fluoro" in keeping a tuna from biting you off?

    If fluoro is that much more resistant, there shouldn't be a need to go as heavy strength as mono, correct? For those fishing fluoro, how heavy are you going?
    So here is my new take on chafe leaders. I'm rigging my big nitghtime jugs with 200lb nylon coated wire. Smaller diam than 200 or 300lb mono or fluoro. My smaller jigs im using 125 black wire. Very small diameter and since there's nothing on a tuna that's harder than wire, they can never chew thru.
     
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    tunakillerjoe1

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    Good info all the way around, wire, hmmmm...one would think if you were making a video, you would be able to correctly count the number of turns on the reel!
     
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