Mikelson Yachts

Garrison

Garrison
May 21, 2008
420
237
Temecula
Name
Garrison
Boat
Mikelson 43’
Why wouldn’t I want to purchase a Mikelson 43’ or 50’?

Before a bunch of you guys who publicly share your wet dreams about Radons and Skipjacks start espousing the virtues of pleasing lines and the proper aesthetics of a sportfisher. I will first remind you, that I have seen many of you on the water and yet your wives still choose to sleep with you.😉 I will concede, and say, yes they do not look as pretty as a Carolina boat on Instagram. But my concerns are more centered around the view of the distant horizon out the window not what you see through yours.

I have had a boating evolution of sorts, off and currently on the water. Trailerable, Baja, and fishing chops were priority number one in years past. Put many many miles on a Blackman 23’, moved on to a 10 year fling with an amazingly capable little Albemarle 24’, and currently a Whaler Conquest 315 Pilot House, slipped in San Diego. All great boats, all enjoyed immensely, and all good in very different ways.

Opportunities and blessings have opened new doors, allowed more time, and created new priorities revolving around family involvement. The wife never much enjoyed bobbing and bashing a little boat through the pacific. Potty buckets and soggy snack food were not exactly her thing. The Whaler has opened up more involvement and enjoyment for all involved...........but, the bucket list dreams are still limited by the craft, and not the desire.

The wants/needs:
Seaworthiness, fishabilty, his and her comfort, enough provisions and accommodations for a larger/growing crew, long range ability for extended island stays, a bucket list Pacific Northwest trip and semi annual trips down the Baja/Cortez, with loads of local fishing in between.

The compromises:
The "coolness factor" was addressed, higher than normal cockpit deck, loss of some top end speed, limited options to choose from.

Although we have seen plenty in the harbor, we have not personally set foot on one yet. That will be changing next week, but from what I gather the Mikelson 43’/50’ and their semi displacement, low center of gravity hulls seem to fit the bill nicely. Seems to have the blend of all requirements with a built in efficiency factor that would make longer distances possible. Hard not to like the looks of many other offerings but also hard to deny the functionality of boats designed and built for our waters and style of fishing.

Any thoughts, prayers, first hand experience with their ride, knowledge of the differences and attributes between the 43’ and 50’, preferred engine packages, red flags, etc?

Thanks,
Garrison
 
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Garrison

Garrison
May 21, 2008
420
237
Temecula
Name
Garrison
Boat
Mikelson 43’
You really can't compare a 43' Mikelson (let alone the 50') to any 30' Skipjack or Radon (in fairness, I haven't been aboard the 38' skipjack). The Mikelsons are much bigger and more capable. And a much better ride in rough seas that really isn't possible with a substantially lighter hull.
I completely agree. I was not attempting to compare the purpose/capabilities of the boats themselves, rather just highlighting how some very functional and well loved craft don’t always have the prettiest packaging.
 
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af dreamer

I Post A Lot But I Can't Edit This
Apr 16, 2007
4,903
2,665
long beach,ca
Name
tom
Boat
44 luhrs dreamer
I looked at a 43 before I bought my 44 Luhrs.The 43 has V drives and I had had many in the past.When they have hatch’s that open above them it was somewhat of a turn off for me.Loved how big the bridge is and the over all.It makes my 44 look like a 40.Also was warned about the quality of the running gear.Tom
 
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MYNomad

Heading South
Dec 12, 2007
4,139
4,692
Pacific Northwest / West Coast Mexico
Name
Rick
Boat
Yes
some very functional and well loved craft don’t always have the prettiest packaging.

The exterior styling of a Mikelson is not much to look at. I loved the lines on my last boat -- it was a thing of beauty, but my Mikelson admittedly looks choppy, at best. In fishing boats, functionality is much more important, at least to me.
I meant to mention earlier -- the raised cockpit deck was always a turn off to me when I saw Mikelsons at boat shows, long before ever considering buying one. And when I made the decision to go ahead with a Mikelson Nomad, that was one of the things that bothered me (as was knowing that I could no longer cruise at 25 knots, and that the fuel burn at 18 knots was prohibitively expensive). Very shortly after taking delivery, I stopped thinking about the raised deck and quickly began to prefer slower speeds. The 43's and 50's are much faster boats (I believe), but I think you will find yourself traveling at hull speed on trips down baja, etc. And those boats are big enough and comfortable enough, and have enough amenities that the journey becomes the pleasure, not the destination.
 

Garrison

Garrison
May 21, 2008
420
237
Temecula
Name
Garrison
Boat
Mikelson 43’
The exterior styling of a Mikelson is not much to look at. I loved the lines on my last boat -- it was a thing of beauty, but my Mikelson admittedly looks choppy, at best. In fishing boats, functionality is much more important, at least to me.
I meant to mention earlier -- the raised cockpit deck was always a turn off to me when I saw Mikelsons at boat shows, long before ever considering buying one. And when I made the decision to go ahead with a Mikelson Nomad, that was one of the things that bothered me (as was knowing that I could no longer cruise at 25 knots, and that the fuel burn at 18 knots was prohibitively expensive). Very shortly after taking delivery, I stopped thinking about the raised deck and quickly began to prefer slower speeds. The 43's and 50's are much faster boats (I believe), but I think you will find yourself traveling at hull speed on trips down baja, etc. And those boats are big enough and comfortable enough, and have enough amenities that the journey becomes the pleasure, not the destination.
Appreciate the feedback. Boats to get sold, lots of boats to look at and many details to iron out before we are experiencing life in the slow lane. But I guess that is all part of the journey too.

✌🏻Fight On!
 

Johnlgarrison

I Post A Lot But I Can't Edit This
  • Jul 27, 2009
    2,638
    1,898
    63
    Temecula CA USA!
    www.inkspotsgreatdanes.com
    Name
    Johnny Garrison
    Boat
    Parker 2320 "Sticky Business 5"
    I think you should get one, If this Garrison from Temecula can't have one the other Garrison from Temecula should have one. Best of luck with your new baby.
     
    Jun 10, 2004
    667
    723
    55
    Jamul
    Name
    used to fish
    Boat
    17 Aquasport
    My slip neighbor had a 50 Mikelson and I had a 50 Silverton and his helm layout was really nice as was the overall boat. His was a 1996 and it was still very nice inside and as mentioned it had a nice raised deck as well. With his helm I would have been tempted to go solo like I used to on a 35 I owned. You will have a floating vacation spot and find yourself and your wife on it most weekends for a few years even if you don't leave the slip.
     
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    Garrison

    Garrison
    May 21, 2008
    420
    237
    Temecula
    Name
    Garrison
    Boat
    Mikelson 43’
    My slip neighbor had a 50 Mikelson and I had a 50 Silverton and his helm layout was really nice as was the overall boat. His was a 1996 and it was still very nice inside and as mentioned it had a nice raised deck as well. With his helm I would have been tempted to go solo like I used to on a 35 I owned. You will have a floating vacation spot and find yourself and your wife on it most weekends for a few years even if you don't leave the slip.
    No plans for house plants😁! But the added comfort would be appreciated.
     

    tuna sniffer

    SD '63
    Jun 16, 2005
    627
    417
    La Mesa
    Name
    Mark
    Boat
    1 tin 1 glass
    A buddy of mine sold his 50 Mikelson about a year ago. I fished on it a few times. Also some booze cruises.There’s nothing I didn’t like about it. Flybridge layout was sweet with lots of seating. Nice big salon. Plenty of cockpit space. Plenty of amenities for those longer trips you’d like to make.Not sure of the tankage though.The only thing I’m not crazy about is the lines. But who the hell cares, you don’t see those when you’re driving the boat. Boat handles real nicely.
     
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    Ali

    Master of Nothing
    Admin
    Apr 24, 2003
    22,748
    7,649
    10
    San Diego
    Name
    That Guy
    Boat
    SeaVee 340Z
    They are both great boats. You can't find a bigger boat under 50' than their 43.

    That said, I think the biggest detractors are look (I don't mind the look but they are certainly not a traditional sportfisher) and speed. These are not fast boats at all but what they are good at is everything else.

    They are well built, well designed, and very comfortable. If your plans include multiday trips and you don't mind leaving the night before they are pretty hard to beat IMO.

    In my experience, the ownership and their crew at Mikelson are top notch.

    Good luck.
     
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    SkipJack Boats

    Advertiser
    Advertiser
    Jul 8, 2020
    220
    174
    64
    Oak Hills, CA
    www.skipjackyachts.com
    Name
    Michael Englebrecht
    Boat
    25 ft Skipjack
    A friend of mine has a 43m Mik and he seems to enjoy it He still uses his smaller boat often, I think it's just easier to run solo than his 43. Why not look at a Delta? That's a badass boat for the West Coast.
    We have a 380 in the water at Newport. Would love to show off our boat!
    Please call if interested.
    Thanks Mike
     

    SkipJack Boats

    Advertiser
    Advertiser
    Jul 8, 2020
    220
    174
    64
    Oak Hills, CA
    www.skipjackyachts.com
    Name
    Michael Englebrecht
    Boat
    25 ft Skipjack
    We have a 380 in the water at Newport. Would love to show off our boat!
    Please call if interested.
    Thanks Mike
    BTW a Skipjack is actually 31,000 lbs and can go 36 mph in a good chop like you wouldn't believe.
    Let us know if you would like to see it. You might be surprised.
     

    Garrison

    Garrison
    May 21, 2008
    420
    237
    Temecula
    Name
    Garrison
    Boat
    Mikelson 43’
    BTW a Skipjack is actually 31,000 lbs and can go 36 mph in a good chop like you wouldn't believe.
    Let us know if you would like to see it. You might be surprised.
    They look like a great ride and even better fishing platform. Not sure 38’ will provide the footprint we are after or the range we are looking for.
     
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    SkipJack Boats

    Advertiser
    Advertiser
    Jul 8, 2020
    220
    174
    64
    Oak Hills, CA
    www.skipjackyachts.com
    Name
    Michael Englebrecht
    Boat
    25 ft Skipjack
    They look like a great ride and even better fishing platform. Not sure 38’ will provide the footprint we are after or the range we are looking for.
    Call me any time.
    We have 600 gallon tanks but we can ad on more.
    Mikelson is a great boat the big difference is price because ours is smaller I think.
     

    Mr Lingcod

    Almost A Member
    Mar 20, 2017
    130
    51
    Santa Barbara
    Name
    Jesse
    Boat
    The Last Soviet
    Why wouldn’t I want to purchase a Mikelson 43’ or 50’?

    Before a bunch of you guys who publicly share your wet dreams about Radons and Skipjacks start espousing the virtues of pleasing lines and the proper aesthetics of a sportfisher. I will first remind you, that I have seen many of you on the water and yet your wives still choose to sleep with you.😉 I will concede, and say, yes they do not look as pretty as a Carolina boat on Instagram. But my concerns are more centered around the view of the distant horizon out the window not what you see through yours.

    I have had a boating evolution of sorts, off and currently on the water. Trailerable, Baja, and fishing chops were priority number one in years past. Put many many miles on a Blackman 23’, moved on to a 10 year fling with an amazingly capable little Albemarle 24’, and currently a Whaler Conquest 315 Pilot House, slipped in San Diego. All great boats, all enjoyed immensely, and all good in very different ways.

    Opportunities and blessings have opened new doors, allowed more time, and created new priorities revolving around family involvement. The wife never much enjoyed bobbing and bashing a little boat through the pacific. Potty buckets and soggy snack food were not exactly her thing. The Whaler has opened up more involvement and enjoyment for all involved...........but, the bucket list dreams are still limited by the craft, and not the desire.

    The wants/needs:
    Seaworthiness, fishabilty, his and her comfort, enough provisions and accommodations for a larger/growing crew, long range ability for extended island stays, a bucket list Pacific Northwest trip and semi annual trips down the Baja/Cortez, with loads of local fishing in between.

    The compromises:
    The "coolness factor" was addressed, higher than normal cockpit deck, loss of some top end speed, limited options to choose from.

    Although we have seen plenty in the harbor, we have not personally set foot on one yet. That will be changing next week, but from what I gather the Mikelson 43’/50’ and their semi displacement, low center of gravity hulls seem to fit the bill nicely. Seems to have the blend of all requirements with a built in efficiency factor that would make longer distances possible. Hard not to like the looks of many other offerings but also hard to deny the functionality of boats designed and built for our waters and style of fishing.

    Any thoughts, prayers, first hand experience with their ride, knowledge of the differences and attributes between the 43’ and 50’, preferred engine packages, red flags, etc?

    Thanks,
    Garrison
    Why wouldn’t I want to purchase a Mikelson 43’ or 50’?

    Before a bunch of you guys who publicly share your wet dreams about Radons and Skipjacks start espousing the virtues of pleasing lines and the proper aesthetics of a sportfisher. I will first remind you, that I have seen many of you on the water and yet your wives still choose to sleep with you.😉 I will concede, and say, yes they do not look as pretty as a Carolina boat on Instagram. But my concerns are more centered around the view of the distant horizon out the window not what you see through yours.

    I have had a boating evolution of sorts, off and currently on the water. Trailerable, Baja, and fishing chops were priority number one in years past. Put many many miles on a Blackman 23’, moved on to a 10 year fling with an amazingly capable little Albemarle 24’, and currently a Whaler Conquest 315 Pilot House, slipped in San Diego. All great boats, all enjoyed immensely, and all good in very different ways.

    Opportunities and blessings have opened new doors, allowed more time, and created new priorities revolving around family involvement. The wife never much enjoyed bobbing and bashing a little boat through the pacific. Potty buckets and soggy snack food were not exactly her thing. The Whaler has opened up more involvement and enjoyment for all involved...........but, the bucket list dreams are still limited by the craft, and not the desire.

    The wants/needs:
    Seaworthiness, fishabilty, his and her comfort, enough provisions and accommodations for a larger/growing crew, long range ability for extended island stays, a bucket list Pacific Northwest trip and semi annual trips down the Baja/Cortez, with loads of local fishing in between.

    The compromises:
    The "coolness factor" was addressed, higher than normal cockpit deck, loss of some top end speed, limited options to choose from.

    Although we have seen plenty in the harbor, we have not personally set foot on one yet. That will be changing next week, but from what I gather the Mikelson 43’/50’ and their semi displacement, low center of gravity hulls seem to fit the bill nicely. Seems to have the blend of all requirements with a built in efficiency factor that would make longer distances possible. Hard not to like the looks of many other offerings but also hard to deny the functionality of boats designed and built for our waters and style of fishing.

    Any thoughts, prayers, first hand experience with their ride, knowledge of the differences and attributes between the 43’ and 50’, preferred engine packages, red flags, etc?

    Thanks,
    Garrison
    The Mikelson is cool. The Delta is really cool. I must ask: Would the people you're trying to go with (wife, kids, etc) even appreciate a nicer boat? I find some just don't like the ocean or boats, no matter what it is. If that is in fact the case, then you might as well head down to Jeff Hull's yard and score a new 29 with twin OBs and just tell everyone you'll be back in a few days, a liberated man. Good luck!
     

    Garrison

    Garrison
    May 21, 2008
    420
    237
    Temecula
    Name
    Garrison
    Boat
    Mikelson 43’
    The Mikelson is cool. The Delta is really cool. I must ask: Would the people you're trying to go with (wife, kids, etc) even appreciate a nicer boat? I find some just don't like the ocean or boats, no matter what it is. If that is in fact the case, then you might as well head down to Jeff Hull's yard and score a new 29 with twin OBs and just tell everyone you'll be back in a few days, a liberated man. Good luck!
    Plenty of crew that is game! The goal is to put smiles on more faces other than our own, and reach some waters that were previously inaccessible. Loved the ride, but I think the days of the three man boat belong in the rear view mirror, for now anyway.
     
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    oceanjake

    Member
    May 10, 2005
    978
    291
    Long Beach
    Name
    Jake
    Boat
    36’ Tiara Express
    I have had the pleasure of fishing quite a bit on a good friend’s 50. From MDR to cabo, la Paz, PV, etc in all types of seas. The boats are classy and wife friendly. The 50 has a great garage mid ship for storing all sorts of long range provisions. I personally like the unconventional look as well. The drawbacks of the boat are : economical for their size but not very fast. We got excited if running downhill and gps ran up to 18. There is very little dead rise in the transom which is not good for a head sea but very good for stability at rest. We fished in some snotty weather when others would not. Here is a big one....the hull is fully cored, including below the water line. Any water intrusion at thru hulls or other penetration points will cause extensive damage. There are some cases that have experienced this and had to be peeled to dry out over a long period and then reglassed over the entire hull. It’s not a good situation. I believe they are fully coded to keep weight down to move that big beam over the water with relatively little HP compared to similarly sized vessels, hence the fuel economy. I’d look at any potential purchase closely with a moisture meter. Finally the raised deck that was mentioned takes some getting used to. It’s nice that the engines can come out easily though. Oh...and if you’re looking at one with ZF V-drives those things are unique and expensive to repair should you need to.

    one final comment regarding the wife/family involvement. Make sure you grill her before making a large commitment on anticipated shared enjoyment. I chased my wife up in size from 30 to 42 to 60 feet in an effort to make her comfortable spending extended periods at the boat where I am most happy. In the end, mine never was thrilled about going OUT on our 60 Hatt and I’ve downsized again to something easier to single hand. Proceed with caution. Bigger is not always better.
     

    Garrison

    Garrison
    May 21, 2008
    420
    237
    Temecula
    Name
    Garrison
    Boat
    Mikelson 43’
    I have had the pleasure of fishing quite a bit on a good friend’s 50. From MDR to cabo, la Paz, PV, etc in all types of seas. The boats are classy and wife friendly. The 50 has a great garage mid ship for storing all sorts of long range provisions. I personally like the unconventional look as well. The drawbacks of the boat are : economical for their size but not very fast. We got excited if running downhill and gps ran up to 18. There is very little dead rise in the transom which is not good for a head sea but very good for stability at rest. We fished in some snotty weather when others would not. Here is a big one....the hull is fully cored, including below the water line. Any water intrusion at thru hulls or other penetration points will cause extensive damage. There are some cases that have experienced this and had to be peeled to dry out over a long period and then reglassed over the entire hull. It’s not a good situation. I believe they are fully coded to keep weight down to move that big beam over the water with relatively little HP compared to similarly sized vessels, hence the fuel economy. I’d look at any potential purchase closely with a moisture meter. Finally the raised deck that was mentioned takes some getting used to. It’s nice that the engines can come out easily though. Oh...and if you’re looking at one with ZF V-drives those things are unique and expensive to repair should you need to.

    one final comment regarding the wife/family involvement. Make sure you grill her before making a large commitment on anticipated shared enjoyment. I chased my wife up in size from 30 to 42 to 60 feet in an effort to make her comfortable spending extended periods at the boat where I am most happy. In the end, mine never was thrilled about going OUT on our 60 Hatt and I’ve downsized again to something easier to single hand. Proceed with caution. Bigger is not always better.
    Thanks for sharing your experience, appreciated. I was actually just reading some articles about the advantages and disadvantages of cored hulls. We are leaning toward the 43’, it seems to have plenty of functional space for our needs and easy enough for a couple to handle. With 800 gallons of fuel we can get where we need to go at hull speed.

    I believe both the nomad and the 43’ are solid glass below the waterline, while other models including the 50’ are cored. In some aspects (water intrusion being one, as you noted) that is comforting to know, but there are also negatives as far as strength to weight ratio, sound and insulation properties. Minor vs potential major. 👍🏻
     
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    michael e. bingham

    I Should Upgrade My Account
    May 26, 2015
    1,081
    1,568
    64
    Name
    Pura Vida
    Boat
    Pura Vida 30' Custom Panga
    Check out the Nomad mikelson , awsome boat , I looked at one a couple of months ago but it sold , I have a 39 foot blackman and a 30 foot center console now and im looking to upgrade to a 55 foot to 63 foot
     
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    MYNomad

    Heading South
    Dec 12, 2007
    4,139
    4,692
    Pacific Northwest / West Coast Mexico
    Name
    Rick
    Boat
    Yes
    Here is a big one....the hull is fully cored, including below the water line. Any water intrusion at thru hulls or other penetration points will cause extensive damage. There are some cases that have experienced this and had to be peeled to dry out over a long period and then reglassed over the entire hull. It’s not a good situation. I believe they are fully coded to keep weight down to move that big beam over the water with relatively little HP compared to similarly sized vessels, hence the fuel economy.
    Coring is definitely something to be concerned about, but it appears Mikelson does it right. Although my Nomad is not cored below the water line, it is above and that was of concern to me before deciding to go ahead and have one built. The coring Mikelson uses is closed cell and supposedly will not absorb water. During the commissioning of my boat, I kept a few of the thru-hull cores cut above the water line, I weighed them in tenths of a gram and put them in a jar with water. Over the years, I have pulled them out, dried them off and re-weighed -- none have gained any weight (ie, no water was absorbed).

    If the coring is of concern, I would try to find examples of Mikelson's with a problem -- I have never heard of any, though with other brands the problem can be ubiquitous. Also, I think you will find that most other planning hull boats are cored below the water line. Personally, I would be more concerned about wood stringers.
     

    sickcat

    Silverback
    Aug 5, 2003
    3,615
    1,623
    64
    LA
    Name
    Kerry
    Boat
    Yellow spot
    No plans for house plants😁! But the added comfort would be appreciated.

    House plants are for houses - not boats! :D

    I have been on a 50' and a 53' (?) and both were very nice. I have come to like the styling and looks. Not sure about the 43' & 50" but quite a few Mikelsons were Fexus designed. Their efficiency and comfortable ride are first class.
     

    Garrison

    Garrison
    May 21, 2008
    420
    237
    Temecula
    Name
    Garrison
    Boat
    Mikelson 43’
    Coring is definitely something to be concerned about, but it appears Mikelson does it right. Although my Nomad is not cored below the water line, it is above and that was of concern to me before deciding to go ahead and have one built. The coring Mikelson uses is closed cell and supposedly will not absorb water. During the commissioning of my boat, I kept a few of the thru-hull cores cut above the water line, I weighed them in tenths of a gram and put them in a jar with water. Over the years, I have pulled them out, dried them off and re-weighed -- none have gained any weight (ie, no water was absorbed).

    If the coring is of concern, I would try to find examples of Mikelson's with a problem -- I have never heard of any, though with other brands the problem can be ubiquitous. Also, I think you will find that most other planning hull boats are cored below the water line. Personally, I would be more concerned about wood stringers.
    MYNomad,
    Thanks, I had the same concerns after hearing horror stories of cored boats that float around the internet. I initially blew the brand off when I read articles in Marlin magazine touting a boat that could use much less fuel than similar sized competitors due to its cored hull and construction methods. Images of a lightly built styrofoam boats were quickly conjured. After heading down and looking at one, that does not seem to be the case at all. I realize the efficiency has much less to do with the construction methods, which are comparatively stout and much more to do with a semi displacement hull design. A compromise in efficiency for speed and perhaps other seakeeping characteristics I have not yet experienced. l still haven’t felt one at sea, we will be working on that next.

    I found a pretty good article by a surveyor that I will attempt to link below that brought me to somewhat of the same conclusion that you did, if anybody following along would like to read it. Although not first hand and I didn’t take any lab samples for my future reference!

    I do believe most of the coring nightmares floating around that all would want to avoid, lie in the balsa/open cell foam realm and apart from best practices. Balsa, like many things boat building, has advantages and disadvantages. I.E. balsa has stronger impact strength and sheer value but......can absorb water and rot.

    One thing that has put me at some sense of ease, is knowing that 70% of their new boat sales are to someone who has already owned one. So my brief calculations conclude, at least 70% of the boats out there are not nightmares. That said, somewhat of a moot point because as stated, leaning hard towards the 43’ unless a really nice 50’ in our budget pops up on the market first.

    Cored Hull Link

    Garrison
     
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