Lure spread and a new way of thinking

Discussion in 'Hawaiian Fishing Reports Forum' started by Turbo808, Jan 23, 2011.

  1. Turbo808

    Turbo808 Newbie

    Location:
    Hawaii
    Name:
    Turbo
    Boat:
    Lila may
    • Messages:
      (46)
    • Likes Received:
      (0)
    Aloha Bruddah's and Sista's

    Today, I am going to be taking to you today about running a new style of spread. Specifically for the local Hawaiian Island offshore waters.


    View attachment 255318

    I'm going to do my best to try and explain the diagram I've provided. This whole spread takes place 15 to 30 feet behind your boat depending on your boats size, how it trolls in the water and so forth.
    Let's start with the lures since they will be the first thing in the water. I am using a combination of 4 inch to 9 inch lures. (jet heads, pineapples, poppers, straight runners what ever tugs your poi poi) I like to run the 4 inch off the center looking to pick up any aku or shibi that are fixed on smalls baits.<the aku="" and="" shibi="" always="" seem="" to="" hit="" the="" baits="" are="" falling="" behind,="" however="" i="" will="" talk="" more="" about="" that="" in="" 1="" just="" sec="">. A Pair of 5 1/2's on 1 side (corner and rigger) and a pair of 7 to 9 inch on the opposite side. Now that the lures are in the water the next step in building your lu'au is adding the spreader bars.
    I hook 2 spreader bars together, a larger 18 inch bar first, followed by a smaller 9 inch bar. These bars are teasers only no hook's. The point of this spread is trying to build a bait ball with the appearance of being solid up front, weak on the laterals and unprotected in the rear. It's extremely important to understand when building your spreader bars, that different island fish are eating different kinds and sizes baits on different islands. A little homework is going to be required. Take a look at you local launch's and ask if you can look in the stomachs of what is being brought in. Post it for your fellow fisherman if you have the time. It's actually very important. On the 18 inch bars I am using 19, 3 to 3.5 inch plastic squid baits, and 10 on the 9 inch bars. Make sure you are using the same color and size squids for all the bars. I really don't know if it matters but that's the way I do it. When constructing your bars it's your choice on what lbs test you want to use. (I use 80 to 100) I attach 600 lbs main line to the leader of the spreader bar and clip it to the transom.
    Next in the water is your toad. I carry 6 on board with me 3 14 inch and 3 larger 16 inch. They are made from boat bumpers painted like aku/mahi/shibi. The 14 inch I like to use closer in shore and around buoy's, the larger 16 inch when I am looking not to scare away aku and smaller shibi. 2 inches might not seem like a lot but it has a much larger profile in the water by up to 30% in my opinion. On the rear of the toad I trail a single teaser about 2 to 3 feet behind. (teaser only no hooks) The toads primary mission is to stay under water. There is much information on construction, if you have any questions. I use the exact same set up to attach the toad to the transom that I use for the spreader bars with one exception I put 3 teasers on the main line in front of the toad at 10 inch's, 18 inch's and 24 inch's. Thus giving the appearance that the toad is chasing the teasers.
    Finally the last thing in your spread are the dredges. I use 16 of the same size baits as on the spreader bars except I make them a different color. I like to use very bright squid baits. Orange, pinks, and yellows. There is more water turbulence closer to the props so that's my logic on that. All teasers on the toad should be the same color as on the dredges.
    Now that everything is in the water spacing is your last task. Your going to want to keep the spreader bars as close to the toad as you can with the lures no more then 3 feet away from the spreader bars. The toad is going to sway 4 to 5 feet on either side depending on speed and other factors. The dredges should be no more then 3 feet on front of the first teaser on the toad.
    This covers the spread, however as I said earlier aku and shibi like to pick up the baits that fall behind. A trick I like to use is hand lines. Once I hook up on the center I drop a hand line back, behind the spread with a rigged squid bait the same color as on the spreader bar. Another trick I like to use is borrowed from our Ika shibi brothers. Bring enough Ika shibi chum to last the day. I throw a cup of chum every 5 min right in the prop wash, more when birds and or fish are close and striking. If done correctly trolled at 3 to 9 knots, depending on location (buoy's, the 500 ledge, the 1000 ledge pinnacles, and what species your targeting) If fished correctly this is absolutely deadly.
    How deadly you ask? Using this trolling pattern as base, combined with chumming, hand lines, pitch baits and other commercial tricks has proven to be a winner. As a commercial trolling fisherman I was hesitant to share this knowledge, but I was taught by my uncle a traditional commercial aku, ika shiba fisherman, and everything that is learned was taught by someone. My last 35 hour trip netted me 27 ono, 14 mahi, 2 marlin less then 275, 17 aku about 20 lbs each and 2 ahi 74 and 103. It's not easy and it's not casual sport fishing, but if your willing to work hard, work your gear and work your charts you will earn your ocean hunter stripes.
    The spreader bars and dredges I am using were built by Rick from Best of Big Game. My lures are almost exclusively Kelela's. He is a local lure maker by the name of Malolo Bob. Both great bruddahs and a all around awesome guys. I personally love their gear. I have some other tricks I use for targeting specific species aku, shibi, marlin, ono, and mahi. If you have question I will share with you what works for me. Aloha</the>
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Jan 24, 2011
  2. el capo

    el capo Member

    Location:
    El Mundo
    Name:
    miguel
    Boat:
    none
    • Messages:
      (6,000)
    • Likes Received:
      (15)
    Looks like it would be very effective.
     
  3. Startmeup

    Startmeup Official Sponsor of Bloodydecks Advertiser

    Location:
    Lahaina, Hawaii, USA
    Name:
    Lee
    Boat:
    Start Me Up Sportfishing
    • Messages:
      (698)
    • Likes Received:
      (11)
    Awesome, great to see people trying new things. It cant hurt, thats how the bird got started. I remember running tiny jets on straight 130 with no leader a mile behind the boat to catch Ahi. We had a great run in the mid 80's by Molokini Crater and that worked great.
     
  4. grander007

    grander007 Well-Known "Member"

    Location:
    Honolulu
    Name:
    zzzz
    Boat:
    46, Bertram, Deep Blue
    • Messages:
      (1,732)
    • Likes Received:
      (105)
    I have been running a 'toad' aka moldcraft fender teaser shorter than the short corner on the same side, and it seems to have worked well w/ marlin. Re spreader bars I'd make sure to have a long enough leader in front of the bar, unless you don't mind losing it and the lure when a marlin crashes it. I have also had alot of luck w/ Pakulas concepts...

    0901 3D Lure Pattern Concept

    Thanks for sharing your thoughts!

    Tight lines,
     
  5. BNaks

    BNaks Newbie

    Location:
    Mililani/HI/USA
    Name:
    Brandon
    Boat:
    Baby Hawk
    • Messages:
      (396)
    • Likes Received:
      (2)
    That is a serious set-up. What needs to be cleared when you get a strike? Are the dredges and spreader bars below the surface??
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2011
  6. Turbo808

    Turbo808 Newbie

    Location:
    Hawaii
    Name:
    Turbo
    Boat:
    Lila may
    • Messages:
      (46)
    • Likes Received:
      (0)
    Grander007,
    I think it is a little hard to understand because of the 2 dimensional aspect of the diagram. The lures and spreader bars are not connected. My last trip out was 35 hours. I had 5 marlin strikes landed 2, both smaller then 275.
    I did have 1 of them attack the toad pretty hard, but he (since it was again smaller then 300 lbs) swam right through it and attacked one of the spreader bars. He ended up eating 5 or 6 of my squid baits. The marlin pulled it right off the bar.
    I use small eggs weights lightly crimped with glass beads to separate the baits for that reason. So if a marlin or big ahi hits the bar instead of lures it just pull's the squid off and leaves the bar to be re rigged. Or am I missing what your saying entirely?
     
  7. Turbo808

    Turbo808 Newbie

    Location:
    Hawaii
    Name:
    Turbo
    Boat:
    Lila may
    • Messages:
      (46)
    • Likes Received:
      (0)
    Bnaks,
    Actually it's surprisingly simple. The dredges are under water but neither the spreader bars or dredges have hooks. I throttle up when I get a strike not long 5 to 6 sec puts a little line out, gives me time to figure out what just hit and what I want to do. Mahi leave it on keep chumming. ono kinda similar leave it in gear 2 knots ish keep chumming see if something else bites. Smaller fish under 40 lbs have my partner hand line in if you know how to handle a fish and get its head turned in the right direction its a very quick ride to the boat less then 1 min. Large tuna dive deep and do large planing circles. that gives you plenty of time to clear any line you need to clear. 7 out of 10 times when the fish hit the lures because they are already on the outside of the bait ball they just swim away from the boat. Marlin do not they are unpredictable. However again throttling up gives you space and time start clearing lines.
     
  8. grander007

    grander007 Well-Known "Member"

    Location:
    Honolulu
    Name:
    zzzz
    Boat:
    46, Bertram, Deep Blue
    • Messages:
      (1,732)
    • Likes Received:
      (105)
    Cool, I understand...lures run separately ie not attached to spreader bars...i like it!

    Tight lines,
     
  9. dausualinc

    dausualinc Newbie

    Location:
    Honolulu
    Name:
    Kekoa
    Boat:
    30' Knife
    • Messages:
      (802)
    • Likes Received:
      (1)
    Great write up, Love the concept. Gotta do the extra work to put fish in the box!
     
  10. Tower Todd

    Tower Todd Number #2

    Location:
    Touring the Pacific Ocean at 12 knots
    Name:
    Todd S.
    Boat:
    274' Long Range
    • Messages:
      (5,996)
    • Likes Received:
      (559)
    Thanks for the detailed write-up. It is awlays cool to see how others set up their spreads. We use spreader bars in Washington for Albacore with small squids and they are deadly on them here too.

    TT
     
  11. popoki

    popoki Newbie

    Location:
    Formerly of Hanapepe Kauai, now Honolulu
    Name:
    Quintin
    Boat:
    "Ho'oKele" 26 Alii Kai
    • Messages:
      (402)
    • Likes Received:
      (16)
    looks promising! gonna have to invest in some supplies first. where are you getting your spreader bars from?
     
  12. Keta

    Keta Ignorant Sheep Farmer

    Location:
    Still in Oregon
    Name:
    Lee
    Boat:
    3' Too Short
    • Messages:
      (3,100)
    • Likes Received:
      (4)
    I don't see anything new here.
     
  13. Turbo808

    Turbo808 Newbie

    Location:
    Hawaii
    Name:
    Turbo
    Boat:
    Lila may
    • Messages:
      (46)
    • Likes Received:
      (0)
    Bunching your spread together I believe is a relatively new concept to most single lure fishermen. Obviously I'm not reinventing the wheel here. All the techniques I employ were taught to me by someone. All I did was put them together and share what works for me in Hawaiian waters.
     
  14. DaGoose

    DaGoose Go pound sand

    Location:
    Vista
    Name:
    Rick Ferguson
    Boat:
    old
    • Messages:
      (1,740)
    • Likes Received:
      (17)
    Hi Lee!

    Everything has been done before. Turbo808 came up with some of is own unique ideas based on his on the water fish savvy, to incorporate them into a spread that works for him, with the rigged baits not attached and spreader bars and dredges on the boat lines with the toad in the middle.

    Give him a wee bit of credit for thinking outside the box and sharing with others.

    Tight Lines!

    Rick
     
  15. Keta

    Keta Ignorant Sheep Farmer

    Location:
    Still in Oregon
    Name:
    Lee
    Boat:
    3' Too Short
    • Messages:
      (3,100)
    • Likes Received:
      (4)

    Turbo,
    What you are describing is typical east coast spreader bar fishing, possibly new to where you are fishing. BTW, Where did you get the name "toad" for your teaser? You should give the credit to the person that did some of your "research" for you.

    Hi Rick,
    Sharing is great but the credit should go to the people that originally developed this fishing method on the east coast of the lower 48. When I was forced to move out of Alaska and was down with a shattered leg I did a lot of reading about warm water fishing and saw this method in several books that were printed in the '90s and earlier. Non metallic spreader bars make it much easier to fish than the old metal ones and credit for this should be given to the person most responsible for this advancement.
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2011
  16. MidwayJ

    MidwayJ Newbie

    Location:
    Oahu, EA25IDE, right under that big Iwa
    Name:
    John
    Boat:
    P-14 "Debbie Ann"
    • Messages:
      (557)
    • Likes Received:
      (0)
    Way to contribute to the discussion, Lee. Whether it's "new" or not isn't really relevant to the thread, it was just an intro into a discussion of a method of fishing that isn't utilized or is underutilized here in Hawaii. Time to unbunch and wash your panties, go back to the mainland boards and find someone else's thread to shit on.

    This is new to me, thanks Turbo 808!
     
  17. Keta

    Keta Ignorant Sheep Farmer

    Location:
    Still in Oregon
    Name:
    Lee
    Boat:
    3' Too Short
    • Messages:
      (3,100)
    • Likes Received:
      (4)
    Spreaderbars might be underutilized but not 'new" to your area. I just like to see credit given to those that came before us. Much in Turbos post is right out of some reaing material I have in my bookshelf, including the term "toad". BTW Although I haven't fished your waters I can add much to this discussion, not Hawaii specific but fish are fish everywhere they live.

    Using dredges behind diving planners or on downriggers is another "new" way to fish, one I have used for some time now (I've used downriggers since the mid 70's for everything fron kokanee to large Pacific halibut) but I would never clame to have come up with doing it. Giving your spread some depth adds much to it's ability to attract fish and if they are deep and won't come up downrigers are the best way to get your hooks down to them. Downriggers are almost a "must have" item in the Pacific NW and on the Great Lakes but they are just now catching on in other places and I think they are "underutilized' in your area. Combine Turbo's "new" method with a pair of planers or downriggers and your catch rate will increase.

    There is more to this than what's on the surface and I do not want to get into a pissing match with people/person I tend to like and has always been upfront with me.
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2011
  18. Turbo808

    Turbo808 Newbie

    Location:
    Hawaii
    Name:
    Turbo
    Boat:
    Lila may
    • Messages:
      (46)
    • Likes Received:
      (0)
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2011
  19. Keta

    Keta Ignorant Sheep Farmer

    Location:
    Still in Oregon
    Name:
    Lee
    Boat:
    3' Too Short
    • Messages:
      (3,100)
    • Likes Received:
      (4)
    You can't piss off of or dis this ignorant sheep farmer.

    The fishing method you describe fishes well but you should consider adding some depth to your spread.
     
  20. Morris Lures

    Morris Lures Pirate

    Location:
    Mililani
    Name:
    Nick
    Boat:
    FORCE 21
    • Messages:
      (687)
    • Likes Received:
      (73)
    Thanks for some new ideas and info turbo.
     

Share This Page