Lots of Sheephead | Kayak Fishing Dana Point, The Strand

Jan 11, 2009
345
118
Trabuco Canyon
www.youtube.com
Name
Glenn
Boat
Hobie ProAngler 12
This past Saturday Anthony, Ryan, Quang, Cesar, and I left Dana Point harbor and peddled up north to the Strand to chase down some Sheephead. It was high tide so we spread out a bit to look for some kelp to clip onto. The kelp was submerged and there wasn’t much floating around, but that was ok. The winds and current were fairly light, so when we found a productive spot it wasn’t too difficult to stay on it.


I made two moves total with the second move going back to the productive reef that I found last week. It was so good there that I called Cesar and Ryan in and then eventually Quang.

At the ended the day I went home with 4 Sheephead after catching many shorts. Cesar and Ryan caught several, and Quang pulled a limit😲
Now last week some dude gave me some garbage about “there won’t be any Sheephead left on that spot”

Well obviously the Sheephead didn’t get to read his comment🤣
On a side note Lobster tastes like Lobster and Sheephead tastes like Sheephead, but both taste great with butter👍
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Oldtimer2

Almost A Member
Jul 29, 2020
228
495
Iowa City Iowa
Name
Rob Malone
Boat
don't got no boat
This past Saturday Anthony, Ryan, Quang, Cesar, and I left Dana Point harbor and peddled up north to the Strand to chase down some Sheephead. It was high tide so we spread out a bit to look for some kelp to clip onto. The kelp was submerged and there wasn’t much floating around, but that was ok. The winds and current were fairly light, so when we found a productive spot it wasn’t too difficult to stay on it. I made two moves total with the second move going back to the productive reef that I found last week. It was so good there that I called Cesar and Ryan in and then eventually Quang.
At the ended the day I went home with 4 Sheephead after catching many shorts. Cesar and Ryan caught several, and Quang pulled a limit😲
Now last week some dude gave me some garbage about “there won’t be any Sheephead left on that spot”
Well obviously the Sheephead didn’t get to read his comment🤣

On a side note Lobster tastes like Lobster and Sheephead tastes like Sheephead, but both taste great with butter👍


It's nice that you had luck fishing. Sheepies can be hard to find and catch. They ARE called poor mans lobster, but like you, I wasn't sure why. They taste good but not like lobster. That is until someone told me to slowly poach them in white wine, butter, and garlic. Now they tasted more like lobster.

I suspect that the poster who told you "garbage" (see your comment in red) was referring to the fact that fishing (including recreational fishing) has reduced the sheepies population quite a bit. The problem is that they are relatively slow growing (they live to >20 yr) and they are a monandric protogynous hermaphrodite. Basically that means that they are all born as females, and at some size (depending on envirorment) they change into males. Thus, taking larger fish means you are taking the males, and that distorts the sex ratio. They then have lower reproductive success, and over time that means....fewer fishies. Since sheepies tend to stay in defined territory, if you take enough fish outa one spot, you can have an effect. I suspect that was what the poster meant. You will not necessarily see the effect right away, but if enough are taken, you will see it in the next generation.

I hope you won't take offense. I didn't read the other posters comment, but I was guessing as to what he meant. Certain species (e.g., dorado) are really quick growers and are pelagic. Tough for recreational fishers to affect them. Other species (like some rockfish....and sheepies) are more susceptible to fishing pressure. I think the poster was mainly saying don't fish the same spot too much.

I like to catch 'em, I like to eat 'em, and I have no problem with you doing so. Just be aware of the biology of this particular species.
 
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Jan 11, 2009
345
118
Trabuco Canyon
www.youtube.com
Name
Glenn
Boat
Hobie ProAngler 12
Well thanks, that was pretty scientific and I’m pretty sure that’s solid science and theory👍
I certainly appreciate and respect your knowledge and input, and no I’m not offended at all. It’s important to hear other peoples prospectives.

But I always wondered how my friend who has been targeting Sheephead at least twice a week for the last ten years in the same general area manages to pull a limit every time he goes?

Sometimes I think of it like the field that I work in, Electronics. I went through so much schooling, knew the theories and formulas like the back of my hand. Aced every test and made the deans list etc..

But what I found out during 30 years of field work that I could know all the theories and formulas but they could barely help you fix a machine.

Problems, issues, broken parts, electrical malfunctions, functional issues can’t be thought on paper for you to study. There’s no theory, science, or formula designed that will help that.

So what I’m getting at is that just because there’s a science or theory behind a topic doesn’t mean it actually works that way in real life. Life is not a test tube theory where there are constants. Life is constantly moving and changing.

Sealife conditions constantly change everyday. Tides in general change four times a day. Fish move in and they move out all the time. A really bad storm system can wreak havoc on inshore reef, Kelp beds disappear and than eventually reappear. A certain spot may be great one week and poor the next.

So I guess what I’m getting at is in theory what you stated is pretty solid, but does it apply to every location or condition? How is it possible for my friend to constantly pull out quality Sheephead twice a week for the last 10 years?
 
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Oldtimer2

Almost A Member
Jul 29, 2020
228
495
Iowa City Iowa
Name
Rob Malone
Boat
don't got no boat
Well thanks, that was pretty scientific and I’m pretty sure that’s solid science and theory👍 I certainly appreciate and respect your knowledge and input, and no I’m not offended at all. It’s important to hear other peoples prospectives.
But I always wondered how my friend who has been targeting Sheephead at least twice a week for the last ten years in the same general area manages to pull a limit every time he goes?
Sometimes I think of it like the field that I work in, Electronics. I went through so much schooling, knew the theories and formulas like the back of my hand. Aced every test and made the deans list etc..
But what I found out during 30 years of field work that I could know all the theories and formulas but they could barely help you fix a machine. Problems, issues, broken parts, electrical malfunctions, functional issues can’t be thought on paper for you to study. There’s no theory, science, or formula designed that will help that.
So what I’m getting at is that just because there’s a science or theory behind a topic doesn’t mean it actually works that way in real life. Life is not a test tube theory where there are constants. Life is constantly moving and changing.
Sealife conditions constantly change everyday. Tides in general change four times a day. Fish move in and they move out all the time. A really bad storm system can wreak havoc on inshore reef, Kelp beds disappear and than eventually reappear. A certain spot may be great one week and poor the next.
So I guess what I’m getting at is in theory what you stated is pretty solid, but does it apply to every location or condition? How is it possible for my friend to constantly pull out quality Sheephead twice a week for the last 10 years?

Very nice reply, Nice to see a thoughtful poster.

Blue comment: absolutely correct. That's why Biology (which I eventually did for my career) is so much more complex that physical chemistry (which is where I started). It's a moving target, and tough to know the rules.

Red comment: First answer,....I don't know. Second answer...I can give a hypothesis. It your friend is the only major fisher of the spot: then perhaps one and/or two conditions pertain. First, the area might be a sheetload bigger area for sheepies than one would expect. Second, it might be a place where there is significant migration of sheepie populations into the area. Even though they are usually territorial, one might guess that some areas are so prime that there is movement in. If however, not only he, but many other people take fish all the time, go back to my first answer. I don't have a clue. If upon study, it turned out to not be a big area, or that there were no nearby populations which could contribute to migration, then again, first answer. It's the Sargent Schultz answer: "I know nuthink".

Thanks for the conversation...it was a pleasure.
 
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