lj canyon swordies report

Discussion in 'Southern California Inshore & Islands Fish Reports' started by revart, Dec 4, 2006.

  1. Sortasober

    Sortasober Rarely fish w/o the kids

    Location:
    Tustin
    Name:
    Steve
    Boat:
    Sold the last 3, now looking
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    Thanks for interpreting the graph, felt like a freshman trying to understand Trig for the 1st time. Now I only feel sortastupid
     
  2. SICK FISH

    SICK FISH SICK FISH

    Location:
    Hermosa Beach
    Name:
    Gregg
    Boat:
    20' Seaway Skiff
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    Great report ~
    I can offer some info on the local swords as I know the top stick boats and know exactly where they fished since late June.

    In Aug they were thick from The oil rigs, Pt. Vincente ,out to the boot and near Point Dume

    These fish inhabited this area untill 5 weeks ago and now they are moving down the line. It is the first time in several years such a volume of swords have been inside.

    The last first hand knowledge of these fish was straight out of Oceanside pretty close to the beach 2 weeks ago.

    If conditions there have not changed dramaticaly in the last 2 weeks just go out look for life. Green water is ok and a temp of 62 is fine too.

    There is a real good chance to hook one because they are indeed there ~ The top stick boat has more than 200 Over

    SICK FISH
     
  3. BiggestT

    BiggestT I've posted enough I should edit this section

    Location:
    Fullerton
    Name:
    SM
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    Salsipuedes & Czech Mate
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    Some of you have asked about the baits I'm trolling and I've obliged with a description, but only photos can do them justice:

    [​IMG]

    Here's another photo of one on the rigging table:

    [​IMG]

    Did I say it was messy? Look at that brown shit in the bucket. That's what comes out of the gut sack in the mantle and that shit is stinky. Make a day of it, make a mess and then hose everything off including yourself as you'll need it. BTW that hunk of squid in the corner is the piece of mantle I trimmed off. Save it and use it for strip baits on moldcraft super chuggers which you can also troll for swords. Also use it to tip sabiki rigs for making mackerel.

    I call them condom squids. The mantles are trimmed and sewn to the leader then slid up into a 17" shell squid. I typically lightly hammer on a 3/4 oz egg sinker to the 400 lb mono leader just below the tip of the mantle and sew around that to hold it straight. I also make several stitches over the lenght of the mantle. Pull the beak off and the 12/0 Mustad 7691 is run through the head and out the hole were the beak was. Take a stitch through the hook eye to hold it in place. Take several stitches from the head to the mantle to hold it in place. You can sew in a red chem light for effect. I rubber band the other chem light 10' up the leader from the bait. You can freeze it all, chem lites are ok in the freezer (they don't freeze). My freezer is full of rigged sword baits and they'll last for years as any freezer dried tentacles reconstitute in water. This will give those interested more purpose when those humboldts are around :cheers: You can also use the smaller 12" to 14" squid they have at Asian markets. Just downsize the shell squid and the hook. The shell squid holds it together in the event of a bill whack and it also prevents the bait from blowing out. You can troll them all night, freeze and reuse them if they're in good enough condition. The boys in New Zealand tell me they troll the stinkiest squid they can find for swords. Like leave the squid on the hood of a car for a couple days and then rig em up and use them. We got a 204 lb bigeye thresher trolling this stuff at night this year. Depth is key. Keep 'em below 40' to minimize makos. Above 80' to stay in the sword zone.

    BTW I've used chem lites and I've used the Lindgren Pitman tricolor LEDs. Blues and purples are what I'm moving to as those colors show the best at depth. I would not troll with a hydraglow in the water. The whole idea with those is to attract bait to a drifting boat and predators will follow. You know, create a whole micro ecosystem under your boat. You're trolling to find fish, not to create a moving ecosystem. Also, the captain I fished with Florida two weeks ago fishes dark 50% of the time and I released my swordfish while fishing dark with him.
     
  4. MurderInc.

    MurderInc. Newbie

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    Los Angeles
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    Bob LeRoy
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    26 Grady white (Relentless)
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    NICE BROTHER!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
     
  5. MikeyLikesIt

    MikeyLikesIt did you say F I S H I N G ???

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    East-a-La-Mesa, baby!
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    starts with an "M".....
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    #1 boat scrubber - Team Madrugador
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    very cool!

    Id like to pull on a swordie, for about 5 minutes.:notworthy
     
  6. MurderInc.

    MurderInc. Newbie

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    Bob LeRoy
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    Thanks for that discriptive report on rigging all of my experience for what is worth out here is from the east coast. We would tie up to a lobster loran marker on one of the shelfs at night and chunk tuna while the charter would usualy sleep i would sneek out one or two lines for sword fish al caught between 100 and 250 deep on a nice live rigged Macckie or squid I am chomppin at the bit to get out here in the so cal waters for sword i've gotten GREAT advice from BD on other spieces and fished very productivly here over the last few years and cant thak you guys enough!!!!!!!!!! I'm waiting on a repair on my boat now and hope to get a shot at these babys before there gone Thank again
     
  7. Bad Dawg

    Bad Dawg Newbie

    Location:
    Oz
    Name:
    hey you
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    What's Next ?
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    Way to go Richard. You're welcome !
    We did this last year at this time and I did catch a sword on rod and reel so I have a few tips that I learned.
    1. These swordfish are not line shy, so I would go with
    heavy wire leader like 400 pound but probably about
    8' of it so you can gaff the fish. Then a 20' top shot of loop to loop 250 pound mono on top of 20' of double line.
    2. I would employ 4 outfits. Two down and two up floating
    off of balloons. We had one come right by the stern at
    0400 in the dark. While you are going to pull on a lot of
    sharks, this is the price of admission. You'll need a lot of bait.
    3. I don't believe that trolling will eliminate or reduce your
    shark bites. Hell, that's how we catch sharks. Also, I have trolled at night and we got a lot of kelp strikes. I set up in the area of the net boats, but far away enough so that if I did hook a sword it wouldn't wind up in a gillnet.

    Mako sharks are dominated by blue sharks at night. The permitted California Longliners who targeted makos did not fish at night for this reason. Don't get me wrong you will catch makos at night.

    Mako sharks are tail nippers. They will eat your bait from the rear end first, and if it's moving you will wind up with 1/2 a bait. That's why we put a stinger hook in mackerel when we fish for makos.

    In order to understand how to hook a swordfish you need to jam your arm down one of their throats one time. It is truly a unique experience, I did it as part of my training program from Captain Ken Schilling. It is like a giant pussy all the way down to the engine room. This is totally different than a marlin. Sooooo, there are only two ways to successfully hook a swordfish. 1. In the corner of the mouth. 2. All the way down into the engine room grabbing the wall or an organ. Otherwise, you are only playing with yourself. After fighting a swordfish for an hour I got the hook back without a mark on the leader. The hook will grab the inside of the throat and slowly tear out. The way to hook him deep is to allow the fish to completely swallow the bait without resistance. That will cost you line. The best hook for that purpose is a 3X strong J hook.
    There is another animal that will show up into your lights at night just to keep you awake.....Giant Humboldt Squid
     
  8. MurderInc.

    MurderInc. Newbie

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    Bob LeRoy
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    Thanks again steve GREAT insight love to read your stuff!!! How long do you think they'll be around my engine will be back together this week and i'm chompin at the bit. would LOVE to pick your brain a bit more.
     
  9. Bad Dawg

    Bad Dawg Newbie

    Location:
    Oz
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    hey you
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    What's Next ?
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    They are year around.
    this is best shot for night time inshore.
     
  10. BiggestT

    BiggestT I've posted enough I should edit this section

    Location:
    Fullerton
    Name:
    SM
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    Salsipuedes & Czech Mate
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    Interesting. I have many more nights trolling swords off SoCal than your two nights drifting and I have yet to catch a blue shark. In fact, I have only caught one blue shark trolling and that was during the daytime while trolling threshers. Nice one of about 8' in length. Everytime we've trolled swords at night it was in areas the stick boats were working during the day. Makos in the top 12 meters, swords in the top 25 meters. Most guys can figure it out ;-)

    It's not my purpose in life to educate and convert all to what I'm doing. Given the long known futility of drifting at night for swords off SoCal, I set about researching to develop a different approach that would take into consideration the constraints (ie Sharks) presented by the unique ecosystem of the SoCal bight. I acknowledge that it's still a work in progress, but I know that I'm closing in on it. Bad Dog you just continue fishing your sharks on cable; I'll troll for swords on 400 lb mono leader. That should be a big hint as to who is actually bypassing (with confidence) the unwanteds and targeting the wanted.

    To those who asked for the dope, your welcome. I have some more research stuff that plays into what I'm doing and I'll dig it up in time. I hope to hook up with those interested to work on these fish, as it's hard to get crew for experimental fishing. Unfortunately, it ain't going to happen for me during this "event" as every weekend through the end of the year is booked with travel or local activities and it's killing me.
     
  11. MikeyLikesIt

    MikeyLikesIt did you say F I S H I N G ???

    Location:
    East-a-La-Mesa, baby!
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    starts with an "M".....
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    #1 boat scrubber - Team Madrugador
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    great thread, and exemplifies why BD came about......to share good intel.


    Now, we cant wait to see a photo of you guys with toad swords......good hunting to you!
     
  12. sdfishkiller

    sdfishkiller Cod Smuggler

    Location:
    Point Loma
    Name:
    Todd Mora
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    19' Whaler: EL SUPER LIZARDFISH
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    How bout some pics? I've noticed you take offense often and are usually rather arrogant in your responses. How's the blood Pressure. Anyway this is coming from a 30yr. old punk who likes catching lizardfish. So how bout some pic's? I like reading both the steve's reports, techniques. no need to act like that. Sorry If I offend you, just think of something witty to comeback with. Happy Holidays
     
  13. Weazel

    Weazel Captain

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    North County
    Name:
    Zach
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    skipjack
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    Thanks for the tutorial Steve. When my boat gets out of the shop, I think I'll be spending a few night out on the pond.
     
  14. icscommand

    icscommand Chief

    Location:
    Rancho San Diego
    Name:
    Dean
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    20' Fish-rite CC
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    The graph and pictures really helped. Thanks for taking the time.
     
  15. byeye

    byeye i love Ali

    Location:
    In the ghetto
    Name:
    Michael T
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    ....
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    HERE HERE Mike, this is a killer thread.
     
  16. tylerderdan

    tylerderdan Stay classy San diego

    Location:
    Glendora
    Name:
    Scott
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    215cc triumph "Unforgiven"
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    The best info I have come across for swords was at the PCS seminar. Chugey Sepulveda spoke on their activity for about an hour. Todd and John Mansur local Sword boat captains did also. Then to finish the night Cory Burlew the catain of the Reaper in Florida spoke. Killer info on the swords.
     
  17. Blackfish

    Blackfish Fishing, a perpetual series of occasions for hope.

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    Lee Obvious
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    :appl: great post...enjoyed it very much

    Bump
     
  18. BiggestT

    BiggestT I've posted enough I should edit this section

    Location:
    Fullerton
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    SM
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    Here's an article on the other piece of the puzzle I've been talking about: makos in Socal. Research was done by Jeffrey Graham and Chugey Sepulveda. I've had Chugey as speak on swords and makos for the Dana Angling Club in September '05. Note the portion on results from their tagging and tracking of makos keyin on what they found on their depth patterns (in his research report, Chugey noted that they tend to be shallower at night than during the day). Then compare this to the chart that was posted by Richard here and what I've said about depths to avoid makos while staying in the zone for swords.

    I'll note that Chugey refrained from making the conclusions on trolling depths that I have,because he is restrained by the scientific method which governs his profession; I'm not. I'll also note that the notes I've read on this from the PCS Swordfish Seminar said to troll at depths from 20' on down to 80'. In talking with Chugey ('05), he had not trolled swords (yet) at night, but someone must have influenced him;-).

    Fish physiologist Jeffrey Graham.Photo: Christina Johnson, California Sea Grant
    The mako shark (Isurus oxyrinchus) is the quintessential shark - an awesome swimming machine, spectacularly acrobatic, fast, sleek and muscular, with a mouth full of razor sharp teeth, As with tunas, makos maintain body temperatures in their locomotor muscles above ambient water temperatures. This regional endothermy, as it is known technically, is believed to enhance muscle power and efficiency while swimming.
    Shortfin mako shark (above and above right): David Itano, Pelagic Fisheries Research Program, Joint Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research, University of Hawaii.
    In the Southern California Bight, the indentation along coastal Southern California that extends about 100 miles into Baja California, Mexico, mako sharks are a secondary target of the swordfish and thresher shark drift gillnet fisheries. Although larger mako sharks have commercial value, smaller ones are often discarded. Many blue sharks are also caught inadvertently and discarded as bycatch.
    Because sharks are exceptionally vulnerable to fishing pressure and because the bight is a nursery ground for newborn and juvenile sharks, biologists have expressed concerns that gillnetting might cause the mako shark population to crash suddenly and remain chronically suppressed. These concerns were heightened recently with the passage of a new regulation banning drift gillnetting north of the Southern California Bight, a measure taken to reduce bycatch of endangered leatherback sea turtles. Some biologists are concerned the regulation will heighten fishing activity in the bight, further intensifying pressure on mako sharks. Given the expected southward shift in fishing effort, it has become even more important to understand the movements and preferred habitats of both target and bycatch species.
    Tagging and Tracking Mako SharksFish physiologist Jeffrey Graham and graduate student Chugey Sepulveda were funded by California Sea Grant to track and study the movements and bioenergetics of mako sharks in the bight, the main goal being to identify habitats essential to the animals’ growth and survival. Such information will help fishery managers craft regulations for ensuring the long-term sustainability of sharks and thus the health of the marine ecosystem in which these top predators play a key role.
    In the tagging technique developed by trainee Chugey Sepulveda, a shortfin mako shark voluntarily swallows a mackerel containing an acoustic transmitter. (above left) Sea Grant trainee Chugey Sepulveda. Photo: Christina Johnson, California Sea Grant. (above right)
    During the course of the grant, the biologists tracked eight juvenile makos tagged with acoustic transmitters that emit electronic signals of water temperature and depth (pressure). Seven of the sharks were tagged within five miles of the Scripps Pier in La Jolla. One was tagged near Carlsbad Canyon about 15 miles north of La Jolla. The sharks were tracked between eight and 56 hours. Tagged sharks ranged from 75 centimeters (the length of a newborn) to 150 centimeters (the length of a two- or three-year-old) and weighed between 6 kilograms and 45 kilograms.
    MAKO FACTSAdult females are bigger than their male counterparts, often growing to exceed 4 meters in length and as much as 500 kilograms in weight. Like other top predators such as tigers and falcons, makos do not reproduce in large numbers. Females carry litters ranging from four to 25 pups; pups can be cannibalistic in utero. Makos have conical snouts, long gill slits, dark blue/gray coloring on upper body, and white on the lower. They are fast swimmers, propelling themselves through the water with short strokes of their thick, powerful tails. Makos are worldwide in distribution in both temperate and tropical seas. While primarily pelagic, they may be also found inshore. Makos do not school and are seldom seen together in large numbers. Their diet consists mainly of bony fishes such as mackerels, tunas, bonitos and swordfish. Tagging Technique
    Attaching archival tags to thresher sharks. Photos: Dan Cartamil, Scripps Institution of Oceanography. (above left and right)
    As part of the project, Sea Grant Trainee Chugey Sepulveda developed a tagging technique in which a transmitter—about the size of a small pencil—was inserted into a dead mackerel. By chumming with ground-up fish, Sepulveda attracted makos to the boat. He was then able to get a mako to voluntarily swallow a mackerel—and hence a tag. Placing tags inside the makos was an important part of the project because it allowed researchers to record stomach temperatures, believed to reflect an animal’s feeding behavior.
    FindingsData from the eight tagged sharks showed that juvenile makos spend about 80 percent of their time within 12 meters of the surface; 15 percent of their time between 12 and 24 meters depth, and five percent of their time at depths greater than 24 meters.
    Body size (and hence age) was positively correlated with maximum swimming depth. In other words, larger, older sharks spent relatively more time at greater depths than smaller, younger ones. Sharks were also observed to continue foraging after being tagged, suggesting the tags had not altered normal activity—a concern when basing scientific findings solely on observations of tagged animals.
    Four of the eight tagged sharks were lured back to the boat, captured and brought to a laboratory for further tests. Necropsies confirmed that shark stomachs contained prey, suggesting that abrupt drops in stomach temperature observed in the tracking record were associated with feeding.
    Impacts and Relevance to RegulationsUnder current regulation, drift gillnets can only be set at night and nets must be submerged at least 12 meters beneath the surface to reduce the risk of entangling whales, dolphins and other marine animals.
    Based on the findings of this California Sea Grant project, this same regulation is likely reducing the risk of entanglement to juvenile mako sharks. This information has been shared with NOAA Fisheries, the federal agency that manages highly migratory shark species.
    Since completing their tagging study, the scientists have received a second grant from California Sea Grant to conduct a similar study of thresher sharks in the bight. This project will add to what is known about the essential habitat requirements of two commercially important sharks in the region. A goal is to identify the relative amount of time different age groups of sharks spend in the depths that make them vulnerable to gillnetting.
    Although mako sharks were observed to spend most of their time above the minimum-depth requirement for gillnets, Graham emphasized that sharks still dive to deeper depths regularly. During these times, he said, they are at risk of being caught. If fishing pressure (i.e., gillnetting) were to intensify significantly, the depth-minimums would offer progressively less protection from overfishing. There would be more nets in the water to ensnare sharks going up and down, Graham said.
    “In the bight, the mako is overfished,” Graham said. “Both young and old sharks are targeted, particularly the young. Sharks take a long time to reach sexual maturity. By removing large numbers of young sharks, a serious detriment to the future population is occurring. We have no basis yet of knowing the size of this detriment for makos and threshers. However, we could be moving toward a time when the adult makos become very rare and the population crashes.”
    The data from these two projects will contribute to a number of ongoing projects and federal initiatives, namely the Fishery Management Plan for Highly Migratory Species Fisheries off the West Coast, the National Plan of Action for the Conservation and Management of Sharks, the Census of Marine Life program and its pilot project, Tagging of Pacific Pelagics.
    NOAA Fisheries, the California Department of Fish and Game, and other university scientists, the researchers will share their results with recreational fishing groups such as the United Anglers Association, commercial organizations such as the Western Fishboat Owners Association, and fisheries scientists and resource managers in Mexico.
    ###
    Contact California Sea Grant :: Contact WebMaster :: Last Updated - August 5, 2004 rsery
     
  19. revart

    revart Newbie

    Location:
    san diego
    Name:
    richard
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    someday
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    [Originally Posted by BiggestT]
    "I have some more research stuff that plays into what I'm doing and I'll dig it up in time. I hope to hook up with those interested to work on these fish, as it's hard to get crew for experimental fishing."

    Steve, experimental fishing, that's what it's about for me. trying different things, trying to put the puzzle together. to learn something new. Swordfish, what a great target species, I can't wait to see the pic's of the first one caught,(hopefully it's mine), but on the other hand if I was to catch a big mako or thresher while swordin, well then at that time I hopefully learn something new for when I'm targeting those fish and you will not hear any complaints from me.

    As far as my next trip is concerned I think that I'm going to try and mix the philosophies that you have given me with others from the big swordfishermen areas. I think I may have found another piece of the puzzle.
     
  20. Lowtide

    Lowtide Newbie

    Location:
    San Diego
    Name:
    Adobo
    Boat:
    78 Sportfisher
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