Line color changes at depth

Discussion in 'Fishing Chit Chat' started by chxh8me, Apr 24, 2019.

  1. chxh8me

    chxh8me Anchovy Slayer

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    ripped likes this.
  2. hucklongfin

    hucklongfin Deep release specialist

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    After the color disappears it looks black! I used to scuba dive and I’ve seen it. It ain’t fake news!
     
  3. wils

    wils lazy-ass well known "member"

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    so red rockfish aren't invisible when the color red disappears at depth?
    wow...………… education - what a wonderful thing.
     
  4. chxh8me

    chxh8me Anchovy Slayer

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    I figured it would just turn gray, but this is way worse.
     
  5. ZZZZZ

    ZZZZZ natural born jig slingers

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    A good jig tickles the lateral line which is what gets the fishes attention. Its not the color. The lateral line is a huge part in how fish feed and key in on prey. Fish a good surface iron jig with 50# imo.

    Cajon red line never really took off. Red disappears first to the human eye.

    True and not. Fish recognize color shades. But no one has ever sat down with a fish and given the fish a color test (deep dark depth and surface sunny depth) and then compared the results to a human. Color to color. I think fish and humans are color blind to each other but each recognize the color for what it is, for themselves.

    So what's important imo is what humans have learned as to what colors seem to work best. But the color a human sees is not the same color to the fish.

    A 7x booger jig does not look the same color to the fish. What we know is the fish are attracted to the booger jig.

    Matching the hatch. Is money but that does not prove the fish see the same color as us. We both see sardine colors but they could be completely different in color. So matching bait fish is important but that does not mean it looks the same color to a fish. It means thats the color that represents the bait for both humans and fish.
     
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2019
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  6. kenstevens1

    kenstevens1 Well-Known "Member"

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    I kinda guessed fish likely see shading. A guy on YouTube did same test with fishing line. A great white is dark on top so looking down on him see very little against dark bottom. Looking up at his white belly you see very little against bright surface. Ande pink on my surface iron setup. Izor yoyo
     
  7. Sandydog

    Sandydog Member

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    Unfortunately, that video will only tell you what those particular colored pieces of plastic will look like underwater. Not line (or anything else) of similar color. When an object is red, that just means it's reflecting mostly red light. It can be reflecting smaller amounts of other colors, which only becomes apparent when red light disappears. (The pink bar on the very right in the video seems to reflect a large amount of blue as a secondary component.)

    Without getting too technical, the color you see is just a combination of how strongly your red, blue, and green cones are stimulated. Each of those cones actually respond to a fairly wide range of colors (red cones also react strongly to blue, which is why red + blue = purple when red and blue are at the opposite end of the color scale). And it's the ratio of how strongly those cones respond which your brain uses to assign a color.

    So there are lots of different ways to make a particular color. Two objects which appear the same shade of red on land may actually be reflecting completely different colors that just happen to average out to red to your eye. And when you put both of them underwater so the red disappears, one may turn black while the other turns blue, or even green. e.g. I had a nosebleed while diving and was puzzled when green lines started appearing on my facemask. Turns out blood looks green when you remove the red.

     
  8. mcrae

    mcrae More wishing than fishing

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    Who knows what fish think? Line color may not matter in the same way to all fish. The comparisons to human vision may be a mistake.
     
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  9. wils

    wils lazy-ass well known "member"

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    legalize 'shrooms. whats the worst that could happen.
     
  10. chxh8me

    chxh8me Anchovy Slayer

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    I firmly believe in matching the hatch, and also understand that fish may not necessarily see colors the same as humans. And braided line color shouldnt matter at all if you have a mono/fluoro leader of adequate length. Unless the situation dictates lack of need for a leader.
    This was more just a laugh at the Cajun Line (and other red braid brand) users who thought their red line “disappeared.” I know red line didn’t really catch on, but it was funny while it lasted. Just seemed like common sense that red objects dont magically disappear under water.
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2019
  11. shellback

    shellback Well-Known "Member"

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    Colour vision in billfish
    Kerstin A. Fritsches
    ,
    Julian C. Partridge
    ,
    John D. Pettigrew
    and
    N. Justin Marshall
    Published:29 September 2000https://doi.org/10.1098/rstb.2000.0678
    Abstract
    Members of the billfish family are highly visual predatory teleosts inhabiting the open ocean. Little is known about their visual abilities in detail, but past studies have indicated that these fishes were likely to be monochromats. This study, however, presents evidence of two anatomically distinct cone types in billfish. The cells are arranged in a regular mosaic pattern of single and twin cones as in many fishes, and this arrangement suggests that the different cone types also show different spectral sensitivity, which is the basis for colour vision. First measurements using microspectrophotometry (MSP) revealed a peak absorption of the rod pigment at 484 nm, indicating that MSP, despite technical difficulties, will be a decisive tool in proving colour vision in these offshore fishes. When hunting, billfish such as the sailfish flash bright blue bars on their sides. This colour reflects largely in ultraviolet (UV) light at 350 nm as revealed by spectrophotometric measurements. Billfish lenses block light of wavelengths below 400 nm, presumably rendering the animal blind to the UV component of its own body colour. Interestingly, at least two prey species of billfish have lenses transmitting light in the UV waveband and are therefore likely to perceive a large fraction of the UV peak found in the blue bar of the sailfish. The possible biological significance of this finding is discussed.

    my own opinion, formed over many beers and caught fish is that fish mostly see in the ultraviolet range
     
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  12. mcrae

    mcrae More wishing than fishing

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    I don't want my line to disappear. I want to see it to avoid tangles.Somewhat related, I don't believe in matching the hatch. I typically want my lure or bait to stand out like a whore among Nuns. I want it to be visible and everything to want to hit it.
     
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  13. chxh8me

    chxh8me Anchovy Slayer

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    I (and probably most others) am with you on that. Most would agree brighter is better at the surface (or just under) for tracking line and preventing tangles. I don’t think red losing color at that level really applies.
     

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