Leader for bait vs jigs

coastvibes

Newbie
May 15, 2021
5
1
30
Los Angeles, CA
Name
Lawrence
Boat
n/a
From the research that I've done, it seems people are recommending heavier line for throwing irons, yoyo
s, jigs, etc. Why is that? Say I'm using a 30lb setup for flylining or sinker rig and decide I want to throw irons, can I just tie it on or do I need heavier line? I'm new as you can tell
 

2Rotten

Live in Oregon/Love to Fish San Diego!
Jan 10, 2010
538
1,211
Junction City OR
Name
Rod Lathrop
Boat
24' North River Seahawk Hardtop "Sun Dog"
From the research that I've done, it seems people are recommending heavier line for throwing irons, yoyos, jigs, etc. Why is that? Say I'm using a 30lb setup for flylining or sinker rig and decide I want to throw irons, can I just tie it on or do I need heavier line?

In my experience jig strikes are often fast, aggressive, reaction strikes. The jig is moving quickly and erraticly. The fish has a tight reaction window to make a go/no-go decision. They typically aren't sitting there eye-balling the jig trying to decide whether or not to eat it. Also, many jigs are fished with "J" hooks or trebles. Often times the hook is inside the mouth, which means the leader is going to have to withstand abrasion from the mouth and teeth. So; first you don't need to use light leader to get a bite because the fish is reacting aggressively to your jig motion, and once they do bite you need heavier leader to keep from getting chewed off.

Fly-lining 'dines is different for 3 reasons. First, the lighter line you use, the stronger your 'dine can swim; less weight and drag from a heavier leader makes for a more natural presentation. Second, the Tuna has a great deal of time to sit there and ponder. Your 'dine is a slow mover compared to a Tuna, even if it is a lively fast swimming bait. The Tuna has all the time it wants to make a Go/No-Go decision. Lighter line is less visible. Third, many people use Circle Hooks with 'dines, or they use a small "J" hook but fish it like a Circle Hook. This typically results in the hook-up happening in the corner of the jaw, safely away from the Tuna's teeth. Because there is less risk of abrasion from the teeth of the Tuna, you can often get away with fishing lighter leader when fishing a sardine.

Long-winded reply to a simple question! Good luck!
 
Last edited:

Shewillbemine

"should of" is NOT a thing
  • Oct 19, 2012
    2,679
    3,114
    California
    Name
    Shewillbemine
    Boat
    Chips N Guac
    Thanks guys! This was helpful. So whats the general rule of thumb for deciding how much heavier to go?

    Go as heavy as they will let you. I lost 3 bluefin fishing with 30# fluoro leader recently so I'm switching to 60# and 80# for my jig setups.
     
    Upvote 0

    Caseymcv

    Old man
    Feb 6, 2017
    472
    197
    Wildomar
    Name
    Casey
    Boat
    In my dreams
    From the research that I've done, it seems people are recommending heavier line for throwing irons, yoyos, jigs, etc. Why is that? Say I'm using a 30lb setup for flylining or sinker rig and decide I want to throw irons, can I just tie it on or do I need heavier line?

    In my experience jig strikes are often fast, aggressive, reaction strikes. The jig is moving quickly and erraticly. The fish has a tight reaction window to make a go/no-go decision. They typically aren't sitting there eye-balling the jig trying to decide whether or not to eat it. Also, many jigs are fished with "J" hooks or trebles. Often times the hook is inside the mouth, which means the leader is going to have to withstand abrasion from the mouth and teeth. So; first you don't need to use light leader because the fish is reacting aggressively to your jig motion, and once they do bite you need heavier leader to keep from getting chewed off.

    Fly-lining 'dines is different for 3 reasons. First, the lighter line you use, the stronger your 'dine can swim; less weight and drag from a heavier leader makes for a more natural presentation. Second, the Tuna has a great deal of time to sit there and ponder. Your 'dine is a slow mover compared to a Tuna, even if it is a lively fast swimming bait. The Tuna has all the time it wants to make a Go/No-Go decision. Lighter line is less visible. Third, many people use Circle Hooks with 'dines, or they use a small "J" hook but fish it like a Circle Hook. This typically results in the hook-up happening in the corner of the jaw, safely away from the Tuna's teeth. Because there is less risk of abrasion from the teeth of the Tuna, you can often get away with fishing lighter leader when fishing a sardine.

    Long-winded reply to a simple question! Good luck!
    Go explanation
     
    Upvote 0

    jer dog

    Fishing is life
    Jun 22, 2006
    9,162
    7,569
    Garden Grove
    Name
    Gerry
    Boat
    One that floats
    Jigs, i'd fish at least 80lb, bait it's what the crew recommends.
    With heavy jigs for yellows,
    You need to keep them from getting to structure, and cutting you off,
    So 40LB or better to get them turned
    Around, some times 80 LB,
    Is not enough, lol.
     
    Upvote 0

    SD2600

    Opinions aren’t constitutional- they are earned
    Apr 13, 2017
    666
    542
    40
    San diego
    Name
    Dustin
    Boat
    26' sea swirl
    All of my trolling jigs have about 3-4’ of 80lb. Both of my jig sticks are spoiled with 50lb braid to about 100 yards of 40 mono. When targeting tuna I tie a 2’ section of 80lb to the 40….. sinker rig depends on the size of the school and time of day 50-80…. Flat fall night time 200lb mono leader…. Fly line 20 and up
     
    Upvote 0

    hucklongfin

    Deep release specialist
    Jul 3, 2003
    9,510
    7,921
    Mission Viejo
    Name
    MarkT
    Boat
    Blazer Bay 1860
    I don’t use fluoro for surface iron or yo-yo. I do with snipers, FF and poppers since I’m targeting tuna. I use a 50# leader for surface and yo-yo, 60# at times for yo-yo. I use an 80-100# leader for poppers.
     
    Last edited:
    Upvote 0

    ZZZZZ

    I Post A Lot But I Can't Edit This
    Dec 11, 2003
    8,169
    10,490
    .
    Name
    .
    Boat
    .
    From the research that I've done, it seems people are recommending heavier line for throwing irons, yoyo
    s, jigs, etc. Why is that? Say I'm using a 30lb setup for flylining or sinker rig and decide I want to throw irons, can I just tie it on or do I need heavier line? I'm new as you can tell

    You can. For cuda, bones, calico, ect. I would still fish 40lb for that stuff on a surface iron. Get the fish to the rail to release or swing over, without breaking off. Rip out of kelp. Maybe a aged mature biscuit eats it. Most of those are lost

    A adult imo. Surface iron with straight mono 40lb Coronados and north or 50lb. If SCI ect mossbacks 50lb. 50lb still casts if using old school straight mono

    Below San Martin Island. 50lb surface iron. Always

    Yoyo, I like 50lb. Structure oriented fish

    50lb :D
     
    Upvote 0

    ZZZZZ

    I Post A Lot But I Can't Edit This
    Dec 11, 2003
    8,169
    10,490
    .
    Name
    .
    Boat
    .
    If firing a magic jig in tough fishing. I don't want to loose it
     
    Upvote 0

    ZZZZZ

    I Post A Lot But I Can't Edit This
    Dec 11, 2003
    8,169
    10,490
    .
    Name
    .
    Boat
    .
    For a few seasons. I fired a 7x booger stock. The jig had 1 full hook with no barb and 2 half hooks, remaining. The full hook was bent back numerous times

    I fished with vonnys panga fleet and beach launched in February. To fish Punta Banda

    Lost that 7x in 10 feet of water on a solid yellowtail school that chased bait into the rocks. Almost cried. I have never hooked a yellow again in that shallow of water

     
    Upvote 0