Launching Question, Maybe Dumb

Discussion in 'Boating Discussion' started by tara11, Nov 19, 2009.

  1. kerncat

    kerncat Well-Known "Member"

    Location:
    San Diego area
    Name:
    Opos
    Boat:
    Gone to a new keeper
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    Some trailer/truck combinations are not set up right and cause problems...with the boat on the trailer and the trailer on the hitch, measure from the street to the bottom of the trailer tongue...then go to the back of the trailer and measure from the street to the bottom of the trailer frame...If your hitch is lower to the ground than the rear of the trailer frame you will have a "sag" at the bumper/hitch and the trailer rear will be much higher and need to be put further into the water...hence the bumper, etc goes in the water...if things are nice an level you are probably just backing down too far...really easy to load if you take it slow and don't sink the trailer fenders....power it on....be sure no one is standing right in front of the boat as you power on as you might miss the bow stop and really hurt someone...and never have anyone stand on the tongue between the boat and the bow stand.

    If you find the trailer tongue is too low...get a different hitch insert with a different "drop" to level things out...

    Spend some time watching others load (concentrate on the good ones..forget the nimrods that can't load or unload...you will pick out the pros in a hurry). Go to a place like South Shores in Mission bay where it's not crowded on a week day and practice, practice, practice...Also didn't see it in the thread but if you don't have side bunks (I don't mean an upright pole or rod on each side of the back of the trailer..they just act as a pivot point in a wind and can really cause problems, get full bunks)....go to a welding shop and get some installed...they will really help in a cross wind...don't use them like a pool table cushion to "bank off of" but as a gentle guide to hold the boat somewhat even as you power on..and remember...the back of the boat steers...not the front...not like a car...think about steering the back of the boat to get the front to follow along and line up.
     
  2. DaGoose

    DaGoose Go pound sand

    Location:
    Vista
    Name:
    Rick Ferguson
    Boat:
    old
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    Tara11,

    Kudo's to you for asking for help and great advice already given. It's all about getting your routine down and some practice. Once you have it down, it will only take a few minutes. I always do a final walk around the boat before launching and after retrieval to make sure everything is ok (plugs in, straps, safety chain, outdrive/outboard up and secured, antenna.... yada yada). You get in trouble when you deviate from this, usually when you rush things.

    Here's a few common practices I see at Oceanside on a regular basis that drive folks nuts.

    -Parking the rig right at the top of the launch ramp blocking traffic when all they need to do is pull all the way forward out of the way.

    -Docking the boat at the launch ramp blocking the way for others rather than using the common dock just around the corner.

    You'll have it down in no time!

    Rick
     
  3. Pescador Paul

    Pescador Paul Well-Known "Member"

    Location:
    Carlsbad, CA
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    Paul
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    Sold the Pursuit- Only a kayak and Wave Runner now
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    Side guides or bunks make driving a boat onto a trailer much easier.
     
  4. tara11

    tara11 Newbie

    Location:
    Offshore
    Name:
    Craig
    Boat:
    2520 XL, Parker, HULIHAN
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    Cool, I have side bunks , all the info is great, I will practice, we are up in MDR, so at low tide the ramp is at a 45 degree angle and high tide perfect, I will try next week when we head out and come back in, I have to change all my old habits, they work perfect, BUT my trailer cost a small fortune to repair and the back of my truck will eventually fall apart, so thanks for all the great info !
     
  5. shinerunner

    shinerunner BARKING MOONBAT

    Location:
    loafers glory
    Name:
    Jim
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    The last 3 boats I've owned and launched and retrieved pretty much the same way.
    Launching I'll skip, just try and keep your truck wheels out of the water.
    When you back the trailer down do so to the point that your lower forward bunks stick out of the water several inches. Experiment until you find the sweet spot then look at your fenders trailer logo or something for a guide while backing your truck down, with the bunks exposed they grab your hull and help you self center. Just ease in slow until the hull grabs and your stopped. Trim your engine(s) up a bit and bump the throttle and ease up to the bow roller, clip and tighten the winch....
     
  6. tara11

    tara11 Newbie

    Location:
    Offshore
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    Craig
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    2520 XL, Parker, HULIHAN
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    It all makes cents, I will give it a go and let you know how it goes, probably fine , trying to save on salt water wrecking havoc on everything :)
     
  7. Dirtguy

    Dirtguy "It's all Good!"

    Location:
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    Name:
    Carl
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    26' Sea Ray, "yes dear..."
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    Exactly! It all depends on your specific trailer , bunk arrangement or rollers , material on the bunks, carpet or plastic and if you have side guides or not. Also, how high your boat sits on the trailer. I built my own so that if the drive falls for some reason, it still clears the road by a few inches. So it sits higher than factory trailers.
    No solid defined rules on YOUR trailer. I just judged how deep I need to go in, by how deep it had to launch. I don't like using too much power to push it all the way up . That is what the winch is for. I usually coast up to the trailer. When it goes in gear, things move faster than I like.
    I like side rails and they make it line up the same every time, wind, or current, doesn't matter. It makes me laugh watching some guy without guides try to load in a wind. And all my bunks are plastic covered.
    No two boats retrieve the same. Then you have the ramp angle.

    So it is a learning experience. But be open to changin your plan fast.

    dg
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2009
  8. slief

    slief Registered Lurker

    Location:
    Simi Valley, CA
    Name:
    Scott
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    Glacier Bay 2680 Cat
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    I wish I could easily power up onto the trailer! I have an electric winch and usually have to use it which pains me, the winch and the hook as well as the boat. My bunks are over the wheel wells! I have tried powering on to the trailer but if the bow is not perfectly aligned, one sponson or the other will slide off the side on the bunk at the front. MDR is one of the steeper ramps I launch from. Channel Islands Harbor can be a real struggle and I have to get my rear tires into the water to even get the boat part way up onto the bunks. Maybe I need to practice powering onto the trailer.

    [​IMG]
     
  9. Dirtguy

    Dirtguy "It's all Good!"

    Location:
    Gilbert, AZ
    Name:
    Carl
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    26' Sea Ray, "yes dear..."
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    Nice boat !
    Honestly, I would look for some side rails for that trailer. Cheaper than glass repair if you do drag it over the fender. I swear, once you've loaded a boat with them, you won't go without. And mine have a built in ladder on the sides. Makes for a real nice easy entry and exit.

    dg
     
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2009
  10. shinerunner

    shinerunner BARKING MOONBAT

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    loafers glory
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    Side bunks ease the pucker factor 10x
     
  11. Dirtguy

    Dirtguy "It's all Good!"

    Location:
    Gilbert, AZ
    Name:
    Carl
    Boat:
    26' Sea Ray, "yes dear..."
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    You know, after thinking about this, a cat like this could use some "Inside guide rails." you could make them similar to outers, but on the inside. I could see this working great and maybe starting a new trend for these cats.

    dg
     
  12. slief

    slief Registered Lurker

    Location:
    Simi Valley, CA
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    Scott
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    Thanks!
    I hear you on the guides however running over the fenders is not an option on my trailer! :food-smiley-014:

    There are guide bunks between the sponsons. The boat only has a few inches to move in either direction if I come some what straight up on the trailer.

    [​IMG]





    If you look at the front of the boat at and the leading edge of the bunk in the pic below, you will see some additional guides for the bow that keep it aligned nice when traveling as well as loading. They only stick up about 2" from the bunk. If I am 1" on either side of those, it won't align properly. One thing I might have to think about is removing those and doing something a bit different that would allow for more leeway at the bow.... Hmmm, now you really got me thinking..

    [​IMG]
     

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