Kill em' all big and small

mindbent

I've posted enough I should edit this section
Feb 26, 2015
675
375
53
I.E.
Name
Jon
Boat
one that floats
I've done all day cattle boats in the past (way in the past) that got upset with me for releasing YT. It has to be bigger than 30# before I even consider keeping it. Bluefin need to be much bigger before I keep them.
 

skipjackrobert

I've posted enough I should edit this section
Apr 2, 2013
7,485
2,549
The OC
Name
Rob
Boat
The Constitution or Tomahawk with Stan
Is this what all sport fishing out of landings is about?

Am willing to take the heat...

Just think it's sad that nobody cares about the future. I'm not talking about a few months from now, I'm talking about a few seasons such as, what happened to the awesome albacore bite.

Conservation isn't about tree or ocean huggers, it's about continuous line peeling trips.
No some of us take a few and stop. Appreciate being out and alive, not killing everything. Some folks just like to kill everything! Not sure why?
 

tunanorth

I've posted enough I should edit this section
Dec 4, 2005
5,661
3,437
By the lake
Name
Tunanorth
Boat
Bass Tracker 16
You can look up the exact quota numbers, but ballparking for the "Northeast Pacific" zone, the yellowfin tuna quota for "all" sportfishing operations, which includes CA sportboats, the entire long range fleet, private boats, and even Mexican pangas and hotel cruisers is 10,000 tons.
The commercial quota for yellowfin tuna in the same zone is 495,000 tons; almost 50 times as much, and in better years they do reach it.
The total sport catch of yellowfin tuna is about 2 percent of the total commercial catch.
 

ShadowX

I've posted enough I should edit this section
Oct 10, 2010
1,470
862
Los Angeles
Name
Alex
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None
Only thing I will add is that I agree with movement of albacore, local abundance of bft last few years, sardines anchovies etc. But what has happened to the blue shark population is just sad. 30 years ago you could see hundreds of fins on the surface in a single trip on a glass day to Catalina. These days most shark diving operations have quit because of too many zeros after soaking 200 pounds of mackerel for 6 hours. yes, you can get a mako or 2 pretty easily right now...but blues used to outnumber them 100 to 1.
The shark population change has nothing to do with sport fisherman. The reality is there is a large demand for shark fins in the asian countries to make soup. This drives up the demand and prices. A kilogram of shark fin is worth $700 in Asia. With high prices, the poachers would net or long line for sharks, cut their fins and throw them back into the ocean. This is obviously not sustainable and causes the population to decrease. Until this poaching and demand goes away, the problem will continue to get worse.

There is an endangered fish called the Totoaba that is caught further down south. The fish swim bladder is worth $20,000 to $80,000 per kilogram. These fish will never survive with that type of demand and price on their heads.

If you understood the true root causes, you will know that fisherman in the US are more environmentally conservative than the rest of the world. We release small fish and allow larger fish to breed. We don't always need government to tell us sound fishing practices. If a person is a true poacher, no amount of regulations would prevent them from continuing to destroy the resources.

Honestly, I think the ocean is very healthy for the majority of the local fish we catch. Some of it has to do with limits on commercial and recreational fishing. Others are due to fishermen catching and releasing fish stock. Other countries that allow long lines and drag nets has decimated their local fish populations, especially in Asian countries. If you compared the US to the world, we tend to be a lot more conservative to preserve the environment and wildlife.

Someone else mentioned it. If you live long enough, you will realize today is some of the best fishing times of your life. You can't compare it back to the 50's when new technologies like monofilament completely changed fishing and resulted in larger number of catches. Other reasons are due to huge commercial fishing operations or netting operations that caused a lot of damage and bycatches.
 

double_entendre

Zat is not my tuna
Aug 1, 2010
190
128
Huntington Beach, CA
Name
Bob
Boat
Ho, ho, ho your boat
My motto is, Keep what you can eat, not what you can catch.
I really wonder about that with some of the photos posted here by guys with a deck full of dead fish. How many of those fish are going to get eaten and how many will get wasted. The States is a strange nation. The richest nation on Earth, yet many go hungry and we throw away more food per capita than any nation on earth.

It's strange to me that there seems to be a deep-seated disbelief in climate change and that sportfishers can overfish in this forum and yet that "good old days" thread is a mile long. Are there any fish species more populous today than they were, say, 100 years ago?

Yes, no question the commercial fisheries do more harm than sportfishers, and they should be heavily regulated. Of course, the same folks here who bemoan catch limits and the MLPA are simultaneously wanting commercial fishermen regulated.

FWIW, the most overfished species per Greenpeace. Wonder what the stocks were like a hundred years ago.

Alaska Pollock
Atlantic Cod or Scrod
Atlantic Halibut (US and Canadian)
Atlantic Salmon (wild and farmed)
Atlantic Sea Scallop
Bluefin tuna
Big Eye Tuna
Chilean Sea Bass (also sold as Patagonia Toothfish)
Greenland Halibut (also sold as Black halibut, Atlantic turbot or Arrowhead flounder)
Grouper (imported to the U.S.)
Hoki (also known as Blue Grenadier)
Monkfish
Ocean Quahog
Orange Roughy
Red Snapper
Redfish (also sold as Ocean Perch)
Sharks
Skates and Rays
South Atlantic Albacore Tuna
Swordfish
Tropical Shrimp (wild and farmed)
Yellowfin Tuna
 

mogambosquid

I've posted enough I should edit this section
Oct 31, 2004
590
427
Carpinteria, CA, Chiriqui, Panama
Name
Greg
Boat
22' panga, 24' diesel inboard
[QUOTE="ShadowX, post: 4891254,

Honestly, I think the ocean is very healthy for the majority of the local fish we catch.
[/QUOTE]

Look up the concept of ‘shifting baseline syndrome’ in fisheries management.
Local abundance is not indicative of general fish stock health. Despite some good fishing, the good old days are not happening now
 

skipjackrobert

I've posted enough I should edit this section
Apr 2, 2013
7,485
2,549
The OC
Name
Rob
Boat
The Constitution or Tomahawk with Stan
because its against the law to kill homeowners and snowflakes. :D
If I could, I would! You get my point smart ass! ;0
 
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plj46

I've posted enough I should edit this section
Jan 7, 2008
7,328
7,607
Socal
Name
john
Boat
24 ft grady white
No some of us take a few and stop. Appreciate being out and alive, not killing everything. Some folks just like to kill everything! Not sure why?
It's about ego and publicity.I saw a post this morning,limits of yellows for 3 or 4 guys all laying on the boat launch dock.What the hell are you going to do with all that fish ? And why lay it all out on the dock on a busy day ?
 

tommyc

Hacker
Jul 30, 2011
328
282
Livermore, CA
Name
Tom
Boat
Beatem N' Eatem
I’ve probably not seen more than 8 blue sharks total in the last 20 years.
The reality is there is a large demand for shark fins in the asian countries to make soup.
Can one of you enlighten me about any commercial use for the blue shark? I don't get out on the NorCal ocean much anymore, but the last time I did, (within the last 5 years), there was no shortage of blue sharks. I never thought anyone had a use for them as I thought they have an iodine like quality that prevents all forms of human consumption. Perhaps they have migrated north to avoid warming water like the albacore did?

As for how much fish someone can eat, I only fish once or twice per year in San Diego and I hope that those trips will produce enough fish to last the year in our household. 5 mil bags flash frozen at the processor and except for the occasional compromised package it all eats great for the entire year. Bonito, Barracuda or Skipjack not included in that statement, but they can all be good for a week or two.
 
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sickcat

Silverback
Aug 5, 2003
3,240
1,260
63
LA
Name
Kerry
Boat
Yellow spot
One of my favorite days ever was in August 1992 we were in a wide open YFT bite all by ourselves out of Ensenada with 8 blue sharks all about 7-8 feet long hanging out under the boat waiting for a free meal. We lost a bunch of fish to the sharks, but we would usually get the front half of the fish back and use those to toss and distract the sharks while we quickly gaffed fresh fish.

It was non-stop, no need to pin on a bait, the tuna would eat bare hook type fishing until we couldn’t lift our arms anymore, and we never saw another boat all day. I’ve probably not seen more than 8 blue sharks total in the last 20 years.
I also remember times when not just blues but all sharks were considerably more abundant and their absence is sad to see and IMO indicative of a larger problem.

On quite a few trips in the last few years out to Tanner/Cortez I have seen mostly blues in numbers I haven't seen in decades. Not sure why they are there in those numbers but I find it encouraging.
 
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yakdout

Professional
Jun 26, 2014
1,393
1,756
San Diego
Name
Brandon
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s and hoes
Can one of you enlighten me about any commercial use for the blue shark? I don't get out on the NorCal ocean much anymore, but the last time I did, (within the last 5 years), there was no shortage of blue sharks. I never thought anyone had a use for them as I thought they have an iodine like quality that prevents all forms of human consumption. Perhaps they have migrated north to avoid warming water like the albacore did?

As for how much fish someone can eat, I only fish once or twice per year in San Diego and I hope that those trips will produce enough fish to last the year in our household. 5 mil bags flash frozen at the processor and except for the occasional compromised package it all eats great for the entire year. Bonito, Barracuda or Skipjack not included in that statement, but they can all be good for a week or two.
Apparently the fins are good enough for a little shark fin chicken noodle.
 

pukahd

I've posted enough I should edit this section
Oct 30, 2004
708
513
Torrance
Name
Brian
Boat
Cabo 216
Also, it's the price for a trip which many wife's will compare a $160 yellowtail 3/4 trip vs buying a 2-10 lb yellows at the market.

Gotta bring home fish to justify a next trip from the wifey......
 

Sdchronix

Alpine Beer Fishing Team
Jul 26, 2018
471
566
30
San diego
Name
Anthony C.
Boat
Hooked Up Boat Club - Parker 2320
It's about ego and publicity.I saw a post this morning,limits of yellows for 3 or 4 guys all laying on the boat launch dock.What the hell are you going to do with all that fish ? And why lay it all out on the dock on a busy day ?
If I come home with limits It will all get eaten. With the way things are going it will probably be eaten before the next trip too. Me and my wife eat plenty of fish and provide fish for group dinners of friends. On top of that some is given away to friends and family as well.
Like pukahd said, gotta justify those costs. If I don't plan on eating it, it gets thrown back.

And as for laying it out on the dock. If he doesn't post the pictures did he really catch limits? hahahaa
 

maxpowers

I've posted enough I should edit this section
Jul 25, 2007
972
553
Fountain Valley, CA
Name
Mike
Boat
someday a 23' Striper
I rarely eat fish but I love fishing and have family and friends who loved fish. I keep as much as I am legally allowed since the fish are all consumed. I do try to limit my take to only 1 or 2 smaller yellows if that is all that is biting.
 
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fishkilr

on the water
Aug 27, 2012
3,287
4,324
long beach,ca.u.s.a.
Name
alby
Boat
None
Can one of you enlighten me about any commercial use for the blue shark? I don't get out on the NorCal ocean much anymore, but the last time I did, (within the last 5 years), there was no shortage of blue sharks. I never thought anyone had a use for them as I thought they have an iodine like quality that prevents all forms of human consumption. Perhaps they have migrated north to avoid warming water like the albacore did?

As for how much fish someone can eat, I only fish once or twice per year in San Diego and I hope that those trips will produce enough fish to last the year in our household. 5 mil bags flash frozen at the processor and except for the occasional compromised package it all eats great for the entire year. Bonito, Barracuda or Skipjack not included in that statement, but they can all be good for a week or two.
When we started sharkin the blues were only good for fins then a couple years later we found a guy who figured out how to sell blue shark as fish and chips on Santa Monica pier who paid us a buck a lb...
 

Omarkayak

I've posted enough I should edit this section
Jul 26, 2007
994
322
Northridge, CA
Name
Bills
Boat
11+ ft, Ocean Kayak Scrambler, P 'N' Queue Pod
I don't know much about fish, but I'm pretty sure albacore ate all the sand bass. Turned out not so good for either one. o_O

Good fishin'!
BDC OK
 

double_entendre

Zat is not my tuna
Aug 1, 2010
190
128
Huntington Beach, CA
Name
Bob
Boat
Ho, ho, ho your boat
yeah. but Greenpeace is stating that they are over-fished. I'm merely wondering how that works?
That was Greenpeace's "red list," which uses these criteria:

Five different criteria were used by Greenpeace to identify species in the 'red': first, the status of the fish, whether they are threatened or endangered; second, whether destructive fishing methods are used (such as bottom trawling); third, whether harvesting the fish has negative impact on non-target species through by-catch; fourth, whether fish are caught illegally by unregulated fishing operations (or "pirate fishing"); and fifth, whether the fishery involved negatively impacts on local communities which depend on fishing for their livelihoods.
If I had to make a reasonable guess, farmed fish tend to negatively impact local populations through increased disease and pollution, thus farmed fish are on the list.