Halibut rigs for Dana Point area

pacificscout

Hey! You got any frozen ice?
  • Jul 28, 2012
    4,915
    4,511
    Fullerton
    Name
    Wally
    Boat
    16ft Scout EMBUSTERO
    Brother used one for this fish.

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    Tifoso

    Chinook,halibut,lings,bottom fish&everything else
    Jul 25, 2016
    703
    221
    norCal (central valley)
    Name
    Lou
    Boat
    🚤

    KXKH

    Almost A Member
  • Feb 28, 2018
    197
    139
    NorCal
    Name
    160
    Boat
    19' Hobie
    Three way swivel rig, about 2ft leader to a cannon ball sinker of 2-5 oz depending on current and a 4-5ft leader to the hook. I like using size 1/0 or 2/0 Owner Flyline as my single hook and adjust the length for the stinger treble to the bait size. I use size 6 Owner Stinger hook 2X.
     

    woodfish330

    I Should Upgrade My Account
  • Aug 14, 2012
    1,250
    2,456
    San Fransisco,CA USA
    Name
    John
    Boat
    Fishead
    JER....now your giving away "secrets" ...lol. After commercial halibut fishing up north... I learned many techniques.. including the effective use of hoochies... and small flashers to "wake" the fish with the actual bait right behind it.

    Another extremely effective rig utilizes larger chrome and red "spin and glow", used by salmon anglers. Again.... tease the fish.... with the flash...then bait right behind it....of course on the same line. Folded foil will work in a pinch.

    I have also utilized Capt. David Bacons ball bouncing technique...with great success. It takes practice.... but you'll be rewarded.

    Last but least.... and I'm probably preaching to the choir.... but most people aren't patient enough to make it past the initial "stun" bite.. without trying to set the hook prematurely... scaring off the fish. Use your rod holders for sure..... set the drag lightly and watch the tip for that "stun" bite.....wait for it....wait for it.....wait for it. BAM. Good luck brother.
     

    Northeastfshman

    I see OJ
  • Dec 20, 2008
    2,502
    2,229
    San Clemente
    Name
    Brett Weinberg
    Boat
    Parker 2120SCDV
    There are 2 schools of thought:
    1. Set the hook
    2. Don’t set the hook
    Which school do you guys follow?

    Wind down slowly till you feel weight, then a quick hook set. Then wind as slowly as possible with at little rod motion as possible. For whatever reason (this was true with Fluke on the East Coast as well) if you keep everything pretty still and smooth a lot times they will swim straight up nice and calm where as if you pump and crank fast or are herky jerky with the rod they start tend to head shake and make bigger runs and are far more likey to shake hooks.
     

    woodfish330

    I Should Upgrade My Account
  • Aug 14, 2012
    1,250
    2,456
    San Fransisco,CA USA
    Name
    John
    Boat
    Fishead
    I'm with you NOREASTER. Pumping your rod when reeling in a flattie is a recipe for disaster.

    Example....
    Picture your hand out the window...while your driving. Move it upward slightly....up it goes....down slightly....down it goes. Every time you pump the rod...its like that hand....gliding in the water column. Do you see what I mean. Sure and steady. Dont get too jumpy when you get color either..... allowing just enough retrieve to guide him upwards by his own power. Like leading a horse. Save that rod "lift" for the final gaff effort.

    Hook set or no.....
    Has to do with hook type. Circle....no..."j" hook...yes. Buts let's not forget that MANY many halibut a caught on the "trap" treble hook.... which is a "j" hook style. Reel down on them slowly....until you feel the weight. Then don't be Jerky. Good luck.

    Oh ....almost forgot. When near the surface, ALL wise anglers back their drag off considerably (while holding spool pressure with ones thumb) because they spook easily. The surface light.... the boat hull.... the decompression they been through.... they know.....its do or die. Many a time I have saved BIG FISH.... from sure disaster...missed gaff head shots....etc.... only to be saved as I knew.....what was coming next. The line and.leader change angles quickly and with a few bigger sweeps of their tails..... down to the bottom they flee. Make all the sense in the world...once you been through it a few times.

    Again..... good luck.
     
    Last edited:

    KXKH

    Almost A Member
  • Feb 28, 2018
    197
    139
    NorCal
    Name
    160
    Boat
    19' Hobie
    There are 2 schools of thought:
    1. Set the hook
    2. Don’t set the hook
    Which school do you guys follow?

    I bottom bounce for majority of my halibut. Sometimes I drag the sinker, proves to be really effective in my experiment when bottom bouncing isn't getting much attention. I always set the hook, often times they bite the stinger hook, as they tend to nip at it before eating it whole. I pay attention to the rhythm, once the rhythm of the bounce changes or if I can see a quick double tap, I know it right away that my bait got picked up and I let the rod tip load up a little before setting the hook. This is how us NorCal boys fish for them with live bait.
     

    Tifoso

    Chinook,halibut,lings,bottom fish&everything else
    Jul 25, 2016
    703
    221
    norCal (central valley)
    Name
    Lou
    Boat
    🚤
    I bottom bounce for majority of my halibut. Sometimes I drag the sinker, proves to be really effective in my experiment when bottom bouncing isn't getting much attention. I always set the hook, often times they bite the stinger hook, as they tend to nip at it before eating it whole. I pay attention to the rhythm, once the rhythm of the bounce changes or if I can see a quick double tap, I know it right away that my bait got picked up and I let the rod tip load up a little before setting the hook. This is how us NorCal boys fish for them with live bait.
    NorCal boy myself. 8-) Thank you!