Grout for simple DIY Project...?

Discussion in 'Nonsense Anything Boards' started by Dinklimit, Jul 20, 2017.

  1. Dinklimit

    Dinklimit Yo Ho, Yo Ho a pirate's life for me...

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    Does grout for bathroom and kitchen floor tiles work and act similar to concrete...?

    I want to make a simple concrete dish/bowl like the ones I see in modern home decor places/magazines and on youtube/google.

    I found a DIY tutorial where you basically make a simple mold out of 2 tupperware containers. Pour the concrete inside and let it set/dry, cut/take off the containers and than bam...you now have a concrete dish/bowl for putting stuff inside.

    Well...I have a friend that has some leftover Quikrete grout and I was hoping I could use grout instead of concrete and still get the same results and/or performance as regular concrete.

    Will the Quikrete grout be fine instead of concrete for this project...?
     
  2. J Woodman

    J Woodman I know nothing

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    No, no, and no. Grout doesn't have much structural strength by itself. It needs to be in small spaces between tile/stone to work, otherwise it will just crumble. For a bowl as small as you described I don't think basic concrete will work either. You will need some type of reinforcing steel in the concrete or probably better yet, use some type of concrete with epoxy and reinforcing steel.
     
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  3. tommysdad

    tommysdad Member

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    Yeah, what he said x 3 more times. Grout crumbles pretty easily.
     
  4. eric harner

    eric harner Caliente Tuna

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    Try Pour Rock mega psi easy to work with but is a hot mix so ya work pretty fast
     
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  5. wils

    wils lazy-ass well known "member"

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    those DIY tutorials sure make things look simple. they don't tell you how many bowls were injured and/or died in the filming of those tutorials. :D
     
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  6. KnotyBuoyz

    KnotyBuoyz Not so newbie anymore

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    Use non shrink grout by Sika or Hub 100. No reinforcing required, no aggregate and can be poured wet and flowable inside the those bowls for molds.
     
  7. maurice escobedo

    maurice escobedo Counselor

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    Supercrete, or rapid set.
    The grout you're talking about is for brick and stone application and is not designed for what you want to use it for. There's more sand than cement in it.
    Hope that helps
     
  8. widgeon

    widgeon Ex-Hunter and gatherer

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    If you watched tutorials, hopefully at least one specified the material used. I'm no genius, but probably best to follow their directions. $15-20 for materials ain't gonna break anybody's bank.
     
  9. Let em eat 74

    Let em eat 74 Well-Known "Member"

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    I've been doing concrete for 27 years and know more than a little on the subject. Use high strength non-shrink grout or they make specific materials for doing countertops. A little crisco on the molds to help it pull out without it breaking is a big help as is chicken wire for structural rigidity. Concrete or grout is strong under compression, not so much under tension, that's what rebar (or in this case chicken wire) is for. If you have one, an orbital sander without the sandpaper works well for vibrating out the bubbles and making it consistent. I'd use mixing bowls because they are smooth instead of Tupperware.
     
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  10. Dinklimit

    Dinklimit Yo Ho, Yo Ho a pirate's life for me...

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    Gonna have to go with the high strength grout or the Sika/Hub 100 or Supercrete/Rapid Set.

    Chicken wire did cross my mind as an option for structural strength. Im just gonna get a couple different brands and do trial and error.

    Thanks everyone for all the input.
     
  11. Dinklimit

    Dinklimit Yo Ho, Yo Ho a pirate's life for me...

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    On a side note...

    I am also planning to make a concrete pad for a BBQ/cooking area in my backyard for my mom and dad.

    To: Let Em Eat 74...(since you have concrete expertise)...

    Do I need rebar for extra strength/durability/structural integrity if the pad is small to medium size...? What if its a pretty large pad...?

    I am planning on making a concrete pad...oh say about...4 inches thick and 6' wide by 8' length.

    Do I need rebar or can I forgo the rebar...? Is there an alternative to rebar that I can use instead (cheaper and/or better to work with)...?

    How thin of a concrete slab can most people get away with if 4" is too thick (cost wise)...? Is it possible to make a 2" thick slab and still have it be strong/durable enough for outdoor use...?
     

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