Getting in shape for the trip

Discussion in 'San Diego Long Range fishing Reports' started by italian/chef, Nov 25, 2018.

  1. italian/chef

    italian/chef Member

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    pietro
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    I see a lot of threads about preparing gear for long trips, but I was wondering if anyone has recommendations for exercises that can help physically prepare you for a long battle with a giant tuna? I’m going in January on a long trip for the first time. I am turning 50 and am in decent shape but am looking for advice.
    Thx
     
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  2. Fincutter

    Fincutter Well-Known "Member"

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    Bartlett, IL
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    Greg
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  3. locvetter

    locvetter Well-Known "Member"

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    Loc Vetter
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    I am on the same trip, and am not in decent shape. Also, have a Masters in Kinesiology after my Bachelors in Physical Education, both before my MD. It is "will" and discipline. Probably the most important thing is find something you enjoy doing. Very few people stick to fitness programs they do not enjoy doing. A few people work at fitness because they enjoy pain and stress for the sake of fitness. Not very many.

    Please, be very careful: in 38 years as an orthopedic surgeon there were countless patients that injured themselves because of enthusiastic commitment to a fitness program. It takes very small misjudgment to get an overuse related injury. It can take a huge long time, if not forever, to recover.

    I look forward to meeting you 1/19 on the RP.
     
  4. ZZZZZ

    ZZZZZ natural born jig slingers

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    Costa Rica. San Diego, Old Del Mar
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    .
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    One of the absolute best ocean core conditioning, balance conditioning, endurance conditioning, and working all those little important muscles that are rarely used that are used for lr fishing. With out a doubt. Are stand up paddle boards. Can be used for exercising in the ocean paddling, harbor, lagoon, lake, swimming pool, slow moving rivers.

    Its not about being buff

    The abbreviation is SUP. Stand up paddle board.

    Do some research on the benefits. Its the real deal.

    Health benefits
    http://www.healthfitnessrevolution.com/top-10-health-benefits-standup-paddleboarding/

    Exercise routines
    https://m.youtube.com/results?search_query=stand+up+paddle+board+exercise+routine

    SUPs. Samples
    https://paddling.com/gear/manufacturers/california-board-company/

    Have a stellar trip
     
  5. ReelDealAngler-

    ReelDealAngler- Born To Fish

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    Dana Point
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    Garry
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    Reel Estate
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    Being in good shape is as much about proper FOOD intake as it is about EXERCISE... limit your SUGAR intake... eat real foods (natural) and stay away from processed garbage food and most fast food. When LR fishing drink lots of water and get plenty of electrolytes.

    With today's modern fishing equipment coupled with good fighting technique a lot of the "grunt work" is done for you. It's more about stamina, breathing properly and having good stance/form (body balance) when it comes to your your physical condition.

    On my last Shogun 7-day I watched an 83 year old man land a 238lb BFT with very little crew assistance... he just slow cranked that fish to the boat while loading up his rod and then cranking in the slack line (we had a good swell which helped), he is also an experienced LR fisherman so he knows how to get comfortable on the rail and he knows how to breathe and he just works at his own pace (slow... but very steady!), he keeps constant tension on his line (he basically guides the fish nose first to the boat).

    G
     
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  6. shellback

    shellback Well-Known "Member"

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    I heard frank say one time "all you have to do is walk up and down hills and then about 2wks before the trip carry around a 30 size reel everywhere you go."
    while this might be an oversimplification, I tried this before my last trip and it worked well.

    arthritis is really limiting my strength training at this point so im now focusing on the above adding core and balance work. using the rail and good technique.

    youth is truly wasted on the young
     
  7. italian/chef

    italian/chef Member

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    Thx for the info
    I already started drinking less ; ) I Limit myself one beer x day ; )
     
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  8. HBB

    HBB Newbie

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    Barney
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    Bad idea! You need to get your tolerance up. You should be putting down 8-12 beers a day.
     
  9. Luke

    Luke Uses alot of bait!

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    I retired three years ago and decided I no longer had the excuse of “no time” to fit in serious exercise. My objective was two fold: 1) greater overall strength to handle anything I might hook, and 2) greater endurance to stay at the rail as long as I wanted. After a year of weight lifting at the direction of a trainer I shifted to a program called BodyPump. It is a group arobic free weight program to music. BodyPump has been around for 50 years. I do three group sessions a week at the local YMCA, each session is for an hour. I push myself each session and feel it. I found this to be perfect for being in shape for LR fishing, both strength and endurance objects are being met.

    Luke
     
  10. locvetter

    locvetter Well-Known "Member"

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    Loc Vetter
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    Two more points, alluded to above:

    SAID principle: Specific Adaptation to Imposed Demands. If you want to get better at a sport - break down the elements of the skills and work on those. For long range, there are few things better than tasing your 80 lb setup -- say a 20 size real, with stand up rail rod, carry it to a local pond or the like - and cast and retrieve, cast and retrieve. Using a hookless lipped crank bait that you pull in as fast as you can. This will tire you. The body is such that when you fatigue it, and then recover, you get fitter for the skills used to create the fatigue.

    Skills building: There does come a time in life, and Pietro, you are not quite there yet, but soon, when you can try and get weight lifting type stronger - but just can't. You can try and cycle faster or further, but you can't. But you can become more skilled. Great example: A former professional partner of mine was, in his prime, the NCAA heavy weight power lifting national champion. He discovered at some point that he just was not getting better at cycling, swimming, or weight training. He still had the coordination to enjoy flying remote control airplanes. Had an idea. He went to Las Vegas and he and his wife hired a juggler from Cirque de Soleil, and they developed a little juggling act --. New skills can be developed and refined, without getting fitter.

    So: Go casting and retrieving. Also, see how much weight you can get off the floor, and for how long, with line coming out the tip top of one of your rail rods, using something like the back of a couch as a lever. (Minimum legal height for rail of a passenger vessel: 1 meter. Height of back of many couches and chairs: 1 meter. Coincidence? Not!) Is under arm, between your legs, kneeling or squatting your favorite option?

    The 83 yo mentioned by Garry above did not get that fish with strength and stamina -- he finessed it. (At least I hope that is the case, as it is what I am planning to do.)

    Right now, whenever the thermometer gets above 45, I got to Wirth Lake, walk with my Mak SEa 20II and 7'6" UC Viper rod to the far end, and cast until I am tired. Rest a bit, changing to different ball or lure, do it again, weld back to the parking and then go home. Sometimes the looks and comments when people watch me casting tennis balls or hookless DTR Minnows adds texture to the day. I am getting better. It is 38 degrees here now.
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2018
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  11. ripped

    ripped I've posted enough I should edit this section

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    I have heard it said that when aging " the legs are the first to go". They weren't kidding. The bluefin in my avatar was a devil fish taking me 5 times around the boat. I spent the year leading up to this trip working free weights to match the amount of drag I expected to pull on. When it was all said and done my upper body was fine but my legs were rubber. It took a couple of days to recover.
     
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  12. larry dickson

    larry dickson Member

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    Chuck Roast
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    Right on Gary. That was Bob W. I spent some time talking with him, super nice and amazing guy, and also great fisherman, lots of patience too. He is also diabetic (type 1), was balancing his insulin shots and diet (sugar intake) peanut butter sandwiches for glucose during the trip. Also has an amazing outlook on life, and realizes every day is a gift and blessing from god. A lot wisdom right there. Could learn a lot from him. I beleive he had 2 over 200#.
    Anyhow a wise friend once told me "it is much easier to stay in shape than to get into shape". Getting and Staying in shape is a life style choice. Physical and mental. When I start my day with some type of workout it always goes much better. I like to mix it up, SUP, swimming, dumbells + bands + balancing, walking are some of the ways I do it. Diet + sleep and enjoying your workouts are important too.
    God bless and tight lines to all.
     
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  13. Wandering Blues

    Wandering Blues I've posted enough I should edit this section

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    Curtis
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    I run typically 18-20 miles per week at 5500’ altitude and consider myself to be pretty fit. And yet, when I finally hooked into a triple digit bluefin this year, my mouth went dry, my legs felt like giant ham hocks, and I thought my head would explode. The Captain was helping me and after a minute he looked at me and gave me the best advice- “Dude, start breathing....”
     
  14. alan760

    alan760 Well-Known "Member"

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    Cardio, walking 2-3 times/week for 40-50 minutes, with walking up and down hills and stairs in my route. Step ups and squats to strengthen my legs and toe touches to stretch my lower back. Kayaking for upper body work and light weights at home for arms and shoulders. Also do crunches and wipers to work on mid section and lower back.

    Cardio is probably the most important since you may be standing at the rail for 10-12 hrs each day.

    If your boots don't have arch supports, buy some. Also I splurged on a black Friday sale and just got the Xtra Tuff shortie with flat soles which I am hoping will be more comfortable and cooler than the standard boots. Cheap knee pads also have saved my knees from scrapes and bruises.
     
  15. ReelDealAngler-

    ReelDealAngler- Born To Fish

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    Great fishing with you Larry... yes Bob has the right attitude which is a big part of his success, he is a true student of the LR game and I admire him... and I can only hope I'm as able as he is at his age.

    You being an ex Baywatch lifeguard know how important diet, exercise and pacing yourself truly is. The gear and terminal we have today really allows us to fish well beyond where most LR anglers would call it quits in the earlier years...just have to have the desire, the funds and the right attitude to get out on the water... and having that never ending desire of getting a true shot at landing your personal best never hurts either. In talking with Bob he was VERY appreciative of having the opportunity to hook and land those beautiful BFT we caught (fish of a lifetime!).

    G
     
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  16. Russ Scholl

    Russ Scholl Member

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    Far too few people enthusiastically committed to a fitness program and that is way more dangerous.
     
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  17. Abaco

    Abaco Member

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    Yeah, this is a legit question. Now that I've eclipsed 50 things are a-changin'... I have a habit, for better or worse, or trying to muscle the fish and get them in quickly. Probably would have been much easier 20 or more years ago. I, anymore, do compound, basic power lifts 2 to 3 times per week. But, I plan to start integrating back in the cardio. And, pacing myself a tad better on my next trip, next fall.
     
  18. carloscafe

    carloscafe Member

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    Darrin
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    These are all good fitness ideas. They are sure to help with the pushing of the carts when the trip returns.
    Just a little joke from a 48 year old guy with a microbrew habit that has given me a gut.

    Darrin
     
  19. shellback

    shellback Well-Known "Member"

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    the legs and then the mind (speaking for myself)
     
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  20. surfgoose

    surfgoose active geezer

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    Gary
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    Any kind of exercise program done regularly (even just walking a few blocks) will help a lot. But I have found that avoiding injury while fishing is even more important.

    I don't wear a few pieces of finger wrap tape anymore, I wear gloves. The fly-fishing gloves made in Idaho by The Waterworks are light, strong, and easy to wear all day. They are called "the Stripper" and are $10 each, so you need to buy both right and left hand gloves. Bob Marriott's Flyfishing Store carries them, too. Easy to take on and off for eating, and having the palm protection keeps your sweaty hand scent off of the bait and lures. It matters.

    Alan mentioned the Xtra Tuff shortie deck boots and insole arch support pads. YES! Also they have finger pull tabs on both front and back, which really helps as you get older. And wear thin socks, not bulky sweat socks.

    Alan also recommended "cheap knee pads." I strongly urge you to spend $35 or less on a quality pair of McDavid 6440 kneepads in a large size (I wear 2XL) and put one or both on as you dress in the morning. They are as thin as your little finger and you won't know that you are wearing them, until you drop a knee to the deck and find that you are perfectly comfortable, not tearing up your knee at all while using the rail.

    And while a lot of fishermen will tell you that you have to spend 10 or 12 hours a day at the rail, I have learned that a whole bunch of that time is completely unproductive and wasted. Just like in deer or other big-game hunting, there are going to be large chunks of time when the prey is just not moving. The captain may have you on the anchor in a great spot, and is not moving until another school comes by, but that doesn't mean that you have to exhaust yourself in the hot sun for hour after hour when nobody on the boat is hooked up (because the fish are not there, right then.) If you are an older fisherman, you have to pace yourself physically in ways that you don't have to when you are still in your 40's and 50's. Don't feel any peer pressure to exhaust yourself. And the small hours of the night can be amazingly productive, if you have not spent all of your energy in the mid-day doldrums.
     

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