Float Tubing Tips

Discussion in 'Kayak Fishing Reports' started by manho, Sep 8, 2016.

  1. manho

    manho 20#

    Location:
    La Habra, ca, US
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    Hi,

    looking into getting into float tubing for socal bays/harbors (mainly for spotted bay bass, halibut, sandbass... etc)
    Any seasoned float tubers can give a couple recommendations for gear, what helped, and modifications thats convenient would be appreciated.

    Thanks and tight lines!
     
  2. pescadito

    pescadito Member

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    john
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    get yourself a good pair of fins, a tide book, and look online for a 2 or 3 rod rack that you can make out of PVC and mount to the side of your tube.

    Also get yourself a good net, rubber is the easiest on fish slime coats and tails. Halibut have really sensitive tails that rot really easily, so I think rubber does the least amount of damage.

    Lastly, get yourself some leashes, because losing gear sucks.
     
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  3. slapazz

    slapazz Member

    Location:
    west hills
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    mike
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    X2 on leashes and rubber nets. Hooks don't get caught on them either. I just started and less is certainly more on your first couple trips. I had 2 rods, net, goPro, lunch, tackle, etc, and it was too much. I would bring the absolute minimum your first trip. Enjoy, it's a different feeling for sure.
     
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  4. TEAMFISH

    TEAMFISH JUST ADD WATER

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    DAVE
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    Life vest!
    Like slapazz said "it's a different feeling for sure". I've done Newport Harbor a few times. Something about kicking your seal looking flippers around is a little un-nerving, especially when a piece of kelp or some trash brushes your leg. Definitely a blast though.
     
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  5. watersdeep

    watersdeep I've posted enough I should edit this section

    Location:
    LB
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    Jed Venture
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    LONG BOARD!
     
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  6. manho

    manho 20#

    Location:
    La Habra, ca, US
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    Winston
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    Thanks everyone!

    I definitely agree by observation that a leash and net is necessary. I'm not afraid of the water or things in the water since I freedive and all.

    But I would like to hear more about how you're attaching these rod holders onto your float, or what type of gearbox (for hooks, jigheads, plastics) would be best?

    I know majority of floats have pockets, so storing them in there is convenient. I do have to say I am pretty sensitive to motion sickness, and I figured the more movement I made with my arms trying to reach things and strain my body/focus on the calm of the water- the more sick i will eventually feel.

    Thanks to those for the tips and advice. I appreciate it!
     
  7. manho

    manho 20#

    Location:
    La Habra, ca, US
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    Winston
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    what fins do you recommend? and how much am I looking to spend?
    are you in waders with boots, or without boots and just pocket fins for your feet?

    PVC makes sense, unsure how to mount it... probably would have to make a frame to rest on the back seat, and then strap/tie down to float?
     
  8. pescadito

    pescadito Member

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    i personally use waders. No need for neoprene unless that's all you have. I use a pair of breathable Gore-Tex simms and a pair of wading boots, and force fins adjustable fins. You don't have to go that rout. in the summer months, guys do it in a pair of board shorts and fins. You can get a cheap $30 pair of fins and have a great time. A lot of guys also use flats wading boots as their wading boots. Back when I first started, I didn't use boots at all. Wore Teva's to protect my waders from the asphalt, and then when I got to the water, strapped the fins straight to my ankles. One thing I would recommend is getting a pair of ankle straps for the fins in case they fall off.

    You can use clips to mount your rod rack to the D rings on the side of your tube, or you can use bungee cords. the options are pretty limitless.

    what kind of float tube do you have?

    google float tube rod rack, and you'll have a good starting point for some ideas as to how to make your own for less than $20.

    Absolutely don't go without your pfd. it should be a given that the PFD will go with you.

    On your first few trips, don't bring too much gear or else you'll just get overwhelmed. Get used to working and fishing in the tube first, and as you get more comfortable, start to increase the amount of gear you bring if needed.
     
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  9. TEAMFISH

    TEAMFISH JUST ADD WATER

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  10. Sebastian Hong

    Sebastian Hong Newbie

    Location:
    Irvine, California
    Name:
    sebastian
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    I've float tubed Newport a lot this summer. I never used waders, but I did a wetsuit once when it was kinda cold. For tackle I would say to always have a good assortment of 3" swimbaits (i like Big hammer), 1/4-3/8 oz jigheads, and some swimjigs (warbaits makes a good one). That's mainly what I use, and I like to have a finesse setup with a dropshot zoom fluke. It helps to have a different bait if you miss one on a piling an try to get it. I haven't had much luck on reaction baits like spinnerbaits and deep cranks, but I haven't fished them much.

    By far best way to fish from the tubes is to just drop a swimbait, jig, or dropshot down on pilings. It seems almost every stretch of pilings holds fish. I don't bother with inner pilings, just hit the ones at the ends of docks. Also have had good luck around open water buoys and isolated pilings in about 20 or so feet of water. The channel is also good if you find eel grass or structure, but it's kind of sketchy in a float tube on a day with lots of boat traffic.

    I just have regular Churchill swimfins, they're like $40. I got my tube off Cabelas.com on sale for $70, it's a Caddis, best one for your money. I tried the PVC tube but mine wouldn't stay upright, it's not really necessary because I hold a rod and can strap one in on this part on my tube.

    As for seasickness, I don't ever feel it but my brother doesn't usually feel very good on boats. We've been in the tubes even on "rougher" days, which isn't much for the harbor, and he hasn't felt anything ever, but I guess it depends on how suceptible you are to get seasick,

    It's so much better than shore fishing, usually only got 1-2, but my brother and I got 7 first time. Good luck, tight lines!
     
  11. kenweaver

    kenweaver Newbie

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    Ken Weaver
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    Just bought Churchill swimfins, it works as a charm, love it!
     
  12. rancanfish

    rancanfish wow, how deep is it here?

    Location:
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    Harold Head
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    Which Churchill did you go with?
     

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