First time offshore

John56434

Idk what to name dis
Aug 1, 2019
190
106
West side
Name
John
Boat
Fishing boat
Looking about going offshore this summer but not to far as 50 gallons of gas is just above 50 miles or so. Going offshore but want to see the land. How far do you have to be to go tuna fishing. I am not all of a sudden going 20 miles offshore thats just nuts. Any tips considering going out from o side/dana
 

Arima-bob

Ship faced aquaholic
Mar 9, 2012
5,098
3,788
Too far from water
Name
Beeulzebob
Boat
uh....
20 miles is typically about the beginning for tuna grounds. Yes, sometimes they are in a lot closer, but most of the time they tend to hang out further, and they won’t be close with this red tide situation.

Is 50 miles range meaning 150 total going by the rule of thirds? I’m curious since my 17 only holds 23 gallons, and I’ll take it 40-50 miles out (with a couple auxiliary gas cans).
 

Shimano Penn

I've posted enough I should edit this section
Dec 3, 2014
1,271
823
63
Chula Vista
Name
David
Boat
Fond Memory
Looking about going offshore this summer but not to far as 50 gallons of gas is just above 50 miles or so. Going offshore but want to see the land. How far do you have to be to go tuna fishing. I am not all of a sudden going 20 miles offshore thats just nuts. Any tips considering going out from o side/dana
You should probably post up some details on your boat, 50 gal fuel capacity would indicate a rather small boat and smaller boats typically get better fuel economy than 1MPG (in fact that's terrible). Give details on make and model, LOA and motor. Also electronics and safety gear.
Also I'd let folks know what kind of boating experience you have, conditions can change quickly "offshore".
Lastly you could look for a "buddy boat" for your first ventures out, a lot of people like the security of having help nearby if needed.
20 miles is nothing, you may need to carry some extra fuel in jugs as mentioned.
 

woodfish330

I've posted enough I should edit this section
Aug 14, 2012
1,168
2,230
San Fransisco,CA USA
Name
John
Boat
Fishead
Out of Dana.... 14 mile bank..... maybe 279.... are as far as you may make it considering your fuel limitations.

Buddy boat.... best suggestion. BOATS US tow service..... a safety net for sure.

One last thought.... fishing buddy with offshore skippering experience piloting your boat.... on that trip and others until you feel more confident. Good luck. Be safe out there brother.
 

John S.

I've posted enough I should edit this section
Aug 4, 2008
730
767
Valley Center, CA
Name
John
Boat
1996 Seaswirl 1850 W/A
You can pm me. But, I have 40 gallon capacity on my 19 foot w/a cuddy with a 115 four stroke Yamaha. I get between 3.5 to 4.2 miles per gallon depending on the sea state. I have caught tuna as close as 10 miles out to around 30 or so out. I have an EPIRB, 2 hand held VHFs, regular VHF, chartplotter, back up handheld GPS, ditch bad, surfboard, wetsuit and my buddies bring a ditch bag and I have a towing service. I pick my days carefully when I go offshore. What I am getting at, is that you need to be over prepared to go offshore. You should already know your boat's range and should be able to determine your miles per gallon average based on the existing sea state. There are some really good offshore guys here using small boats but they are also highly proficient in all aspects of boat handling and navigation. Seeing land means nothing. You can die a mile off the beach or offshore out of sight of land. Do not let the sight of land lull you into a false sense of security. There are plenty of times off shore when I could not see land and I was only 10 out and other times I could see land at 20 out. You have a compass. You cant see land? Big whoop. Dont let anyone talk you into going offshore before you are ready. If you dont like the sea state then dont go offshore. You are the skipper. You fuck up and someone gets hurt on your boat then you have to live with it. If your buddies get pissed if you nix a trip because it is too foggy then tough shit. The fish will be there. You pick another day.

John
 

John56434

Idk what to name dis
Aug 1, 2019
190
106
West side
Name
John
Boat
Fishing boat
20 miles is typically about the beginning for tuna grounds. Yes, sometimes they are in a lot closer, but most of the time they tend to hang out further, and they won’t be close with this red tide situation.

Is 50 miles range meaning 150 total going by the rule of thirds? I’m curious since my 17 only holds 23 gallons, and I’ll take it 40-50 miles out (with a couple auxiliary gas cans).
50 miles round trip
 

djam

I've posted enough I should edit this section
Jun 2, 2008
151
118
Irvine
Name
Dave
Boat
Parker 2320 (Terabite)
That's not much, it's not just getting out there and back, you will burn and burn as you run around. Maybe a lot if you are running from foamer to foamer and making your boat come up out of the hole, maybe pushing water instead of planning at times. Also depends on where you start. Starting from SD puts you closer to some areas, DP mid range, NP further and so on. I typically run anywhere from 80 -150 miles on a full tuna trip out of DP. I've got them 4 miles out, but that is one out of 50 trips. When I run to Cat or SCI straight I get about 1.9 mpg loaded up (bait, ice, hoes). I've burned 115 gallons offshore on some days. I think the other thing is if you are going, get a life raft, better to bob around in the water on one of those than in a jacket....and an auto release eprib.

I think you might be better off to get on the ho's list.
 

roberyak

Member
Aug 6, 2008
34
13
Mira Loma, CA USA
Name
Robert
Boat
Hobie Revolution
Have to agree here 50 miles round trip is a pretty short distance for offshore tuna fishing. As woodfish330 said very local banks like the 14 mile bank or 267 would be about the range. At either of those banks depending on the day you may or may not see the land but that should not be the determining factor on where you go. Watch the weather pick your windows and give it a try. Out of San Diego you could fish the upper/lower 9 mile bank which has bailed us out several times heading back from the outer and lower banks. Good luck.
 

Robert c. Sample

I've posted enough I should edit this section
Feb 11, 2019
146
369
65
Snowflake arizona
Name
Robert sample
Boat
Reel rage
Be safe season is just beginning. Take a short trip at first .Get a feel for it .Thatis how you will gain confidence in yourself and your boat.It take years to learn the ways of the ocean.Time is on your side..safety first. You will feel good coming home by using your head..And gaining knowledge everytime..good luck..have fun.
 
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Vikingman

Well-Known "Member"
Apr 16, 2006
56
78
Chula Vista
Name
Tim
Boat
24ft Skipjack Molly M
Lots of good advice here. Stay in closer until you feel comfortable with your boat. I am assuming you have a GPS chart and VHS radio on your boat? You might want to take the Power Squadron boating course as well.
 

gonzo25

GOT A BIG ONE
Nov 20, 2008
3,546
1,949
san diego calif. usa
Name
george
Boat
18' Invader CC 15' bayliner son of a beach
There will be lots of time you won't be able to see land and not be that far out, a little haze is all it takes.
The first thing you need to do is get a compass and a chart AND LEARN HOW TO USE THEM. Every gps you will buy will come with a warning not to be used for navigation but the fact is anything can happen to it or the power you need to run it, I had mine disconnected by mistake by my son in law while trying to connect a bilge pump, when he powered it back on it lost the track back and was stuck in demo mode, made it back with a compass and a chart. Even if you have a gps you will need to learn how to use it, there are several different formats that are use and if your trying to relay or find someone by the numbers you may not get right to them but you will be close. Let me know if your interested and I can give you a couple of links that will explain the different formats and how the degrees of long. and lat. are worked out and it will all make sense.

Most important, do what you feel comfortable with and don't let anyone pressure you into anything. You are the skipper and everyone's life is your responsibility take it seriously, don't be getting all fucked up, check the weather before you go and keep an eye on it at all times because it can change quickly, think about every possible problem you could have and what you should do if they happen, trust me you won't be able to think of them all. The ocean is a very unforgiving place, shit happens and it happens fast. One last tip. Everyone thinks if the shit hits the fan they will be the one who will keep a cool head and know exactly what to do... the reality is that most people will freeze and you never know how you will react until your in that situation. It's like being a clutch player, most people don't do as well under pressure, and some perform at their best when the pressure is on, either way you have to know what to do when the moment arrives. Just use good common sense and have a good time. buddy boating is a good place to start.
 

yakmandan

I've posted enough I should edit this section
May 30, 2007
691
819
AZ.
Name
DAN
Boat
19ft Bayrunner Baja
I've been going out on other people's boats for years but the first time I went off shore in my own boat I was a little nervous. Thank God for BD
There was a thread with a list of everything you should have with you on the boat I can't seem to find it maybe someone else knows where it is.

I bring a ditch bag with an eperb, waterproof hand held radio, flare gun and flares, first aid kit, Paracord, knife, mirror, dikes, cumpass and other stuff I can't remember right now
On the boat Chart plotter, compass, fire extinguisher, bolt cutters and all the required safety equipment
An extra bilge pump some hoses and clamps
There's more but you get the idea.
Know your limitations
Pay attention to the weather and water conditions.
Try to find someone to buddy boat with. That will help you feel more comfortable out there
Make sure you know how to use your equipment there might not be enough time to learn it when there's an emergency.
Be safe and have fun
 

Paul Ward

I've posted enough I should edit this section
Jul 17, 2007
1,107
523
Costa Mesa
Name
wooddog
Boat
Boaty
Looking about going offshore this summer but not to far as 50 gallons of gas is just above 50 miles or so. Going offshore but want to see the land. How far do you have to be to go tuna fishing. I am not all of a sudden going 20 miles offshore thats just nuts. Any tips considering going out from o side/dana
Go till you have no cell phone service then fish..lol
 

SouthBayKiller

I've posted enough I should edit this section
Mar 27, 2003
7,483
7,849
39
Long Beach, CA
Name
Robert
Boat
none
Once you have your safety gear figured out and the boat 100% solid do yourself a favor and pay for Fishdope. The reports are good, but most important is the charts. Learn to use and read those, learn to read weather reports and forecasts and get out there and do it.

Offshore fishing is like looking for water in the desert. When me and my group of buddies put a plan together for fishing offshore we don’t say we are going to X miles and just drop in the line, we just try to figure out a likely area and have a general areas on the chart then check them out. While on the way to that likely area we keep a lookout as the plan can and should change as you go if you see anything. Take your time, go slower than you think you should, especially in any quality looking zones.

Don’t get hung up on going to specific banks just because someone said that’s a good spot. There are almost no “spots” when fishing offshore. The banks can hold life, but in most cases they are just general areas. For instance I might tell a buddy we found fish at the 302, but that could be within 10 or so miles in any direction of that bank. Was it on the inside of the 302, Outside edge, south or north, etc. It’s just a general area reference like a city is on a map.

Lots of trips you might literally see nothing. Others you might see fish and not catch. Get and use binoculars. One bird can make or break your day. Also, slow down. It’s very easy to overshoot a good area because you are focused on getting to a waypoint. Things change constantly and small clues are easy to miss.

Put your radio on 16 and leave it there. Only listen to 72 for entertainment. It’s the original form of fake news. There is so much BS on there that even if there was real news on there you wouldn’t be able to weed it out from the BS unless you know the person on the other end. People who are fishing in groups using 72 to communicate normally use codes anyways so unless you know the code there is know way for you to know what the real waypoint is. Then you toss in all the drunks fighting, idiots, racist BS, etc. Its not worth anything except a good chuckle unless you are working with someone else.

Don’t fish for boats. A group of boats could be a good thing, could also be a bunch of idiots.

Last tip: Failure is normal. You never hear about the bust trips but anyone who says otherwise is lying. Info from anyone who never has a bad trip is BS.

Going out, not getting hurt, not breaking anything on the boat and making it back safe is a good trip.

Good luck and stay safe.
 

Shewillbemine

"should of" is NOT a thing
Oct 19, 2012
2,380
2,633
California
Name
Shewillbemine
Boat
Chips N Guac
Lately, there's almost no such thing as tuna with land in sight.

Unless you mean Catalina, San Clemente or Coronado Isands.

I launch out of Dana. Have done zero fishing this year due to the quarantine (gotta take care of kiddos; not about the virus).

I'd be happy to buddy boat with you. I only started offshore fishing a couple years ago and I know what it's like to be out there for the first few times. Terrifying and exciting. Almost always solo btw.
 

RodRage

Share the stoke!
Sep 7, 2017
2,233
3,961
58
Surf City Ca.
Name
Huntington Hillbilly
Boat
Chaparral 224 Fisherman
There will be lots of time you won't be able to see land and not be that far out, a little haze is all it takes.
The first thing you need to do is get a compass and a chart AND LEARN HOW TO USE THEM. Every gps you will buy will come with a warning not to be used for navigation but the fact is anything can happen to it or the power you need to run it, I had mine disconnected by mistake by my son in law while trying to connect a bilge pump, when he powered it back on it lost the track back and was stuck in demo mode, made it back with a compass and a chart. Even if you have a gps you will need to learn how to use it, there are several different formats that are use and if your trying to relay or find someone by the numbers you may not get right to them but you will be close. Let me know if your interested and I can give you a couple of links that will explain the different formats and how the degrees of long. and lat. are worked out and it will all make sense.

Most important, do what you feel comfortable with and don't let anyone pressure you into anything. You are the skipper and everyone's life is your responsibility take it seriously, don't be getting all fucked up, check the weather before you go and keep an eye on it at all times because it can change quickly, think about every possible problem you could have and what you should do if they happen, trust me you won't be able to think of them all. The ocean is a very unforgiving place, shit happens and it happens fast. One last tip. Everyone thinks if the shit hits the fan they will be the one who will keep a cool head and know exactly what to do... the reality is that most people will freeze and you never know how you will react until your in that situation. It's like being a clutch player, most people don't do as well under pressure, and some perform at their best when the pressure is on, either way you have to know what to do when the moment arrives. Just use good common sense and have a good time. buddy boating is a good place to start.
Good advice here ALWAYS go with your gut feeling when safety is involved, I religiously do my homework and make a float plan the night before that I relay to my wife before heading out but it never fails someone aboard thinks its their boat and they know better. Take a suggestion but ALWAYS remember your the skipper and responsible for your crew. Be safe and find a buddie boater, Once the shit hits the fan Ill be pulling my tub down n would be glad to share info.
 

yakmandan

I've posted enough I should edit this section
May 30, 2007
691
819
AZ.
Name
DAN
Boat
19ft Bayrunner Baja
I forgot to mention the plug it's easy to forget I hate to admit it but I've forgotten it twice. Luckily for me I can reach over the transom and put it in but it scared the crap out of me. The fact that I've done it twice only shows how stupid I am.
 
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Workplacesafety

Reducing workplace injuries and illnesses
Feb 20, 2010
3,483
2,852
Long Beach Ca.
Name
Jeff Bruner
Boat
14ft Valco, San Diego Long Range Boats
Make a check list before you leave your house, Dan. That was the solution for me forgetting things like the plug. In 42 years of trailer boat fishing, I've done it more than trice. LOL although it sure ain't funny. Stay safe out there.
 
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