Does Braid Color Matter with Short Fluoro Leaders?

Dexter Outdoors

TanstaaflSD

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  • Dec 3, 2013
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    San Diego, CA, USA
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    Tanstaafl
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    n/a
    I was on 2 LR trips this past fall :-) !!
    I noticed a change in braid color choices this fall . . . fewer all white and more colored in less visible tones (light / dark green, etc.) . Logic suggests that bright white mainline to short FL leaders should be less successful than short FL leader to green mainline. I had switched from dark green to white for boat / crew preference (you could not see the dark green), but may next use a light green that can be seen, but may be less visible underwater.
    Does anyone have any reliable observations? If we go braid-fluoro should we have 15 to 20 foot fluoro to separate bait from from bright white?
    Thanks.
     
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    surfgoose

    active geezer
  • Jul 29, 2010
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    Gary
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    whichever has the longest bunk
    Having lost several very big tuna in the last part of the fight, from color to almost-gaff range, to "pulled hooks" I gave the matter some very careful analysis. In looking carefully at further tuna who came aboard, a lot of them had torn a larger-than-hook-diameter hole in their jaw with the shank of the circle hooks. A violent head shake could have thrown the hook.

    I gave up the braid-to-short-fluoro system, and added ten to twenty yards of heavy mono to the braid. At the critical end-game of the fight now I have something with some stretch, some shock absorber, so when the rod is at max and the reel is at max and I am straining as hard as possible to get that fish up the last few critical yards to the waiting gaffs, and he freaks out at the huge dark shadow over him and makes violent head shakes in panic, there is something that will stretch rather than rip a bigger hole in his jaw.

    Yes, that means that the rod-length fluoro leader adds another connection point to the system. But it hasn't failed me yet, and I haven't "pulled the hook" on another tuna. And it makes the whole matter of braid color moot.
     
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    undone

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    Jan 11, 2016
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    From underneath white line is least visible, from above a darker color is better camouflaged. From the side a color in between may be better.

    So find a line with this color combination and only use it right side up.

    My choice is to use white.
     
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    ZZZZZ

    I Post A Lot But I Can't Edit This
    Dec 11, 2003
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    Just convince yourself that your spectra is just a piece of eel grass or other floating debri that fish are not wary of. Its just part of the environment :D and your flouro is just a broken off jelly fish tentacle or some type of jelly life and your sardine is swimming naturallyLOL :rolleyes:

    Aged mature big fish don't get big by being stupid. They do let their guard down from time to time.

    White works just fine
     
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    Steve K

    Hey, I'm gettin' bit...
    Jan 2, 2005
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    18' Bayrunner, but I like the American Angler and the Red Rooster III
    Observing a perceived advantage to Blue vs White, I fished a few yards of 80 lb Blue Threadlock at Lupe in early October. We had 7 fish one day, 12 the next. Most lost fish to sharks I’ve ever seen, but my first trip there since we were allowed to return. Tough fishing, I had three bites, brought one to gaff.

    I now have. 300 yard spool of 80 lb JB Hollow that will be used on the January 14 day. Going to try using it for finger trap connections as well as step splicing 10 yards onto my reels. Can I get back to you?
     
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    $norkle

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    May 6, 2008
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    In my dreams!
    From underneath white line is least visible, from above a darker color is better camouflaged. From the side a color in between may be better.

    So find a line with this color combination and only use it right side up.

    My choice is to use white.

    And most pelagic fish have eyes in which the densest packing of visual receptors is below the midline of the retina---in other words most pelagics attack prey looking up-----conclusion is that white would be less visible to fish.
     
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    Loudmusic

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    Nov 15, 2011
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    Ryan
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    Fish From Shore
    Keep in mind that the deeper you go the more that colors are filtered out by the water. By the time you get to about 30' deep there are almost no reds left.

    As a scuba instructor, I have to teach my students about this as they progress to deeper diving.

    Generally speaking, you would think that the colors would be lost in the same order as the color spectrum.....red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, violet, however this is not actually always true. We intentionally use fins and masks that are High Visibility Yellow on deeper dives as it makes it easier to continue to see the colors at deeper depths.

    By about 100' deep, most colors have turned to brown but the High Visibility Yellow still looks very yellow. When looking up, the sunlight will overpower most colors so anything light will disappear but darker colors are more visible due to the contrast with the sunlight.

    Looking at the picture attached, this was taken from approximately 40' deep in clear, clean water. You'll notice the lack of color except the very bottom of the right hand kelp where cameras light Lit it up a little bit. You'll also notice that the dark colored kelp is visible all the way to the surface however due to the light at the surface, any light colored objects would disappear.

    I'm not going to say that one color of spectra is better than another, I just think color is probably over rated a bit. I use white or green, I can't say I catch more fish with one or the other. I like the white better because I can see it into the water further to better follow my line and try to avoid tangles.

    IMG_1395.JPG
     
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    fuj

    Almost A Member
    Aug 13, 2006
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    nope
    Natively black Dyneema is available. It will be interesting to see if it ever becomes available as a fishing super-braid.
     
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    Bill W

    tunaholic
  • Jan 12, 2006
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    When you have a good day it most likely be for other reasons, not because you changed to blue Spectra. A lot has to do with light at depth. Imagine fishing with the line used on long line commercial boats and they do very well. The peanut size brains that a tuna has is all about impulse reactions without a lot of reasoning. But they have great eyesight on the surface. I just do not think they care about what is happening 6 feet away from your bait.
     
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    ReelDealAngler-

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    Jul 27, 2017
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    I use blaze orange braid and have never had a problem getting bit with it (unless of course no one is getting bit at all). I did notice this year on those more finicky larger grade BFT that a slightly longer 10-12 foot leader was getting bit better than my normal 5-8 foot leader. I use the blaze orange braid because I can differentiate my line from everyone else's line which comes in handy on the long soak slow pick bite where everyone has a lot of line out and the boat is swinging... and the blaze orange actually shows up better in bright light (boat's nite lights) or dark light than white does, also know my gear in a line up and anglers tend not to grab my gear in a frenzy bite as it is very different than the rest. I also think that a fish's total side to side vision span is not greater than my 5-12 foot fluoro leader which tends to defray light making it less visible to the fish's eye... while also giving me some extra abrasion resistance over mono leader on the fighting end. With that said at times I have used the jumbo black marker (construction size) that I've notched out and run 5-7 feet of my blaze orange braid above my fluoro leader thru it blacking it out.

    G
     
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    Fishybuzz

    fishybuzz
    Apr 4, 2003
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    Tuna are pigs...they see something they think is food they eat it.. they have to cause they never know when the next meal will show up...the whole trick is getting your bait(sardine, chandelier rig, chunk, big bait, tube, salami, puffer,flyer,sea horse, triggerfish,red crab, squid, hot wing, potato chip bag) into their feeding zone and they will eat it........I have thought about how longliners can catch fish with 500# mono, 15/0 HEAVY circle hook, with a half pound chunk of bait on a static line.....not very stealthy, not very natural,not slick in any way....i came to the conclusion that tuna are pigs....

    We obsess about the presentation but really all we are doing is attempting to get our piece of bait into the zone....JMO
     
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    ZZZZZ

    I Post A Lot But I Can't Edit This
    Dec 11, 2003
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    You may send all your stealth gear to me please :D

    They are true pigs. Eat it now or never see it again. Well accept for a dead bait and a stationary kite bait and a .... But thats where, they never know when thier next meal will show up. Slurp, inhale, blow out
     
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    Squid Sammich

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    Yellowfin tuna have to eat more than other species of tuna even, between 4-7% of their body weight every single day. That is the price they pay for being warm blooded and being more of a “quick twitch athlete” than bft and others. That has a lot to do with their voracious appetites.
     
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    DannyNoonan

    Smarter than I look...
    Apr 17, 2007
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    Lund LX200 LFC
    I absolutely hate being next to somebody at the rail using a low-viz spectra color - especially early in the morning, late afternoon, or any time it's overcast. My eyesight isn't quite as sharp as it was when I was younger, and it becomes extremely difficult to tell where my (white) line lies relative to theirs. White, yellow, chartreuse - no problem. Blue, dark green, brown - impossible to see. And forget about trying to determine whether clockwise or counter-clockwise wraps will readily undo a minor tangle.

    If you really want to make friends on a LR trip, use dark green PowerPro and be sure to strip line off of your reel with your free hand to make sure the bait can wander unencumbered!
     
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    ReelDealAngler-

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    Long liners set their lines and leave them for days, many of those fish are hooked at night when stealth is not as big a factor. When sport fishing you may have 25+ baited hooks in the water at any given time, long lines have many hundreds of baited hooks in the water so more fish are attracted to the massive sent trail and large volume of bait. IMO its called sport fishing for a reason, fishing 500# mono on a 15/0 hook on a big 80 size reel (or hydraulic winch) is NOT very sporting or challenging in my view. And in 45+ years of both salt and freshwater fishing I've seen where size does matter... and at times lighter line and "stealth fishing" gets bit considerably better than not (especially so in the west coast salt walter venue if the live fin bait is smaller or not as hardy as normal and the targeted fish are keyed in on smaller forage targets).

    The "must use white braided line" BS came early on when the colored lines seriously marked up LR boat's hulls, decks, etc., the newer generation of colored braided lines retain their color better and don't tend to leave colored streaks on everything they rub against. A lot of professional Billfish captains that make their living following fishing line (with some serious purses (money) to be won in the Billfish tournament world) use hi-vis yellow and blaze orange braided lines over white... so go figure!

    G
     
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    mogambosquid

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    Oct 31, 2004
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    I like free diving and have been lucky enough to jump over the side and check things out during slack times at hurricane and the lower banks, Obviously human eyes aren't tuna eyes, but a few things have really stood out:

    White spectra is ridiculously visible, our lines look like clothes lines hanging in the current behind the boat, when viewed from above, the side or below , I've seen blue and yellow too, not much different.

    In bright conditions, mono and fluoro are really visible too, they both seem to have a kind of a fiber optic effect that looks like a laser going from the spectra connection to the bait.

    Shiny black hooks and black or silver rings totally reflect in sunlight as well, and are really apparent from pretty far away. Nose, butt or shoulder, it doesn't matter.

    From a human perspective, baits trailing all this crap look completely unnatural and kinda dumb, despite all our tweaking, there is nothing stealth about it.

    When guys would knock off a butt hooked bait to change it out for a fresh one, that bait would get eaten really fast. Even if no fish were initially visible, one or more would shoot up from 20 fathoms or deeper and inhale that bait, then lazily spiral back down. Clearly the tuna are noticing something unnatural about all the gear, and key in on a bait as soon as it's gone. Everyone has seen fish plugged with discarded hook baits when they're gutted on deck.

    I've chatted about this with some capts and crew who also like jumping over the side and looking around. The conclusion always has been that if it weren't for competition between tuna for a bait, bites would be pretty scarce. I agree that they can be pigs and very opportunistic feeders, but they are also highly evolved apex predators, keenly tuned into their environment with incredible sensory and visual abilities, definitely not mindless eating automatons. I spent some time at the Laboratorio Achotines in Panama (the tuna lab) and was able to observe spawning in yellowfin, individual fish and groups of males were clearly responding to visual and other cues from the females in the school, and synchronizing their behavior accordingly, it was pretty complex behavior and fascinating to see.

    Back to the original question, I like the black sharpie deal on white spectra myself
     
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    JohnTFT

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    Feb 11, 2007
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    The only reason to use White spectra concerns the hollow variety.

    The coating process to make hollow spectra colored can make it more difficult to make loops and splices.

    As the previous poster noted all the gear is really visible. Chumming and keeping a school around the boat creates the predatory response necessary for successful live bait fishing.

    They are pigs after all.
     
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    undone

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    Jan 11, 2016
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    I have many different colors of braid on my reels, mostly chosen for me being able to see it clearly, other colors because I got a very good deal on them. About 99% of the time I'm not that concerned about the color being an issue for the fish.
     
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