Dead Battery Help

Discussion in 'Hawaiian Fishing Reports Forum' started by beauchat, May 26, 2010.

  1. beauchat

    beauchat Newbie

    Location:
    Kaneohe,Hawaii
    Name:
    Russ
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    17 Radon
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    So i go to run my motor on Saturday and it turns out that the batteries are too weak to turn the motor over. When I turn on the ignition Ill get a click and a weak sound from the starter motor. (BTW im running a dual battery setup and put the battery switch to BOTH to try get it started)

    My question is, How long does a motor have to be running to charge a battery? I run my motor religiously every week for about 10 minutes. Last time I took the boat out was at the end of march for a full run so i assumed that the batteries were fully charged.

    Can the batteries slowly drain over this period of time even thought im running it weekly for 10 minutes? Should I be runnig the boat longer to recharge the batteries? Since the last time I took it for a run was only about 2 months ago, it seems odd that the batteries would drain so soon. Im gonna have the batteries checked but if this happens again maybe i have to suspect a bad alternator.

    One of the batteries was dated 12/2007 so its about 30 months old. Any ideas?
     
  2. ConSeaMate

    ConSeaMate Legend in my own mind

    Location:
    Escondido
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    Buster Brown
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    The motors on a boat do not recharge the battery's......they only maintain the charge in them.......
     
  3. jagerhunchback

    jagerhunchback MCLMM

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    sometimes oahu.....mostly iraq occasionally afghan
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    mike
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    trickle charger.
     
  4. beauchat

    beauchat Newbie

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    Russ
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    Shouldn't the alternators be charging the batteries when the motor is running?
     
  5. jagerhunchback

    jagerhunchback MCLMM

    Location:
    sometimes oahu.....mostly iraq occasionally afghan
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    mike
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    this kind of explains it Charging System Basics

    i'm not sure how much electronics and stuff you are running, on my boat i do alot of night fishing and have way more crap then i need, so i have 2 house batteries and 2 batteries just for the engines, i trickle charge my stuff if i think i'm sucking juice out of the batts from all the lights and other crap i run at night. another thing is that batteries do come to a point where they wont hold a charge anymore so you need to just replace the batteries. i believe a number of the board members buy their batteries from costco as you can replace them under warranty up to a year after you purchase them.
     
  6. DaveR

    DaveR Newbie

    Location:
    Irvine
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    David
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    28' Skipjack
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    Batteries slowly loose their charge, and allowing them to do so shortens the life of your batteries which of course costs you more. You should be either trickle charging, solar charging or charging on a regular (e.g.: every 2 weeks) basis.

    And alternators will recharge batteries if sized appropriately, and the engines run long enough to do so... not likely in 10 minutes for the average set-up.
    .
    .
    .
     
    Last edited: May 26, 2010
  7. Mo Betta

    Mo Betta Offshore Prop Changer

    Location:
    El Cajon
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    Frank
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    25' Wellcraft sportsman "Mo Betta", 14' Livingston"Caballito"
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    I replace my batteries every 2 years, just to be safe. 1 battery this year, the other battery next year. Cheap insurance.
     
  8. fishjunkie

    fishjunkie Newbie

    Location:
    San Diego
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    Kurt
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    Here is the skinny on batteries. They just dont go bad like people think. It is imortant for a battery to be clean. A battery will discharge if current is allowed to travel from the negative terminal to the positive terminal. Debris moisture and salts will provide a path for this discharge. 10 min is not enough time to charge a marine battery. A trickle charger is your best bet for maintaining your batteries at home, and isolating your starter battery is always a good idea if you dont plan on running your engine for long periods of time.
     
  9. abdiver7777

    abdiver7777 abdiver7777

    Location:
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    Sir2you
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    No Name........
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    Find out the capacity of your alternator.... most are 35 amp....... if each battery is rated for 250 amps and they are pretty far down you are looking at about 15 hours of run time in the mid rpm range to fully charge them........ pretty basic math but other factors involved like how much load is on while cruising.... it adds up fast....
    Radar, radio, gps, fish finder, lights, etc all take away from from the capacity to charge the batteries.
    I suggest a solar charger or a "Battery Tender" to keep the batteries topped off while in storage.
    I also suggest a simple test to check for parasitic power draw when everything you can think of is off during storage.
    take a small dashboard 12v light bulb and solder about 5 inches wire on each terminal, then disconnect the ground cable at the battery terminal. Now touch one wire to the battery terminal and the other to the ground cable and see if the bulb glows. if yes something is drawing power killing your batteries while in storage.

    you could have somthing as minor as a radio that keeps enough power to maintain channel memory. One little power draw can discharge a battery pretty fast.
    1/2 amp X 24hr/day = 12 amp/hr of battery draw..... 12 amp/hr x 14 days = 156 amp hours. That means your battery is dead...........

    good luck....... I hope your batteries are just not too old and need replacement......

    I sure miss those huge Tuna you guys get........
     
  10. pura vida

    pura vida Pura Vida II

    Location:
    Murrieta
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    Gene Miller
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    Good response

    Dirty cables, or damaged cables will also prevent the batteries from accepting a charge. If the battery (s) do go bad, then they obviously won't hold a charge.
     
  11. abdiver7777

    abdiver7777 abdiver7777

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    PS: if you have a volt meter measure the voltage at the battery before starting. You should have about 12.5 - 12.8 volts. after you start the engine take a reading again. you should have 13.5 - 14.3 volts, this means your alternator is doing its job.
     
  12. coffeeman

    coffeeman Newbie

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    mario
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    everyone pretty much flogged this already but here is my .02. outboard motors are not inboards or car engines. their alternators/magnetos are mainly used to keep the engine supplied with power and some extra to maintain batteries. If your alternator isn't charging 100% then the motor will compensate and draw from your batteries. I usually just hookup the charger right when I get home for a few hours and check battery voltage as it is not an auto charger. A word of caution if you charger is not autoshutoff it will overcharge your batteries and dramatically shorten the life of the battery and possibly make it explode or in my case, as i have forgotten to remove the charger, make the batter swell up and spew acid all over itself. Try and get deep cycle batteries as these are ment to be discharge many more times than standard batteries. Most culprits of outboard charging on 2 strokes anyways is the rectifier. If your on the mainland anytime soon stop by harbor freight and pick up a solar trickle charger for cheap which will maintain a good charge till you use the boat. Napa has them, but wayyy more expensive.
     
  13. MANAPUA MAN

    MANAPUA MAN Newbie

    Location:
    HONOLULU HAWAII
    Name:
    CAPPY
    Boat:
    23' TROPHY W/A "KEKILIA"
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    You're doing exactly what many believe is appropriate to keep batteries charged....."Starting and running the engines for 10 minutes or less" some even do this daily instead of once a week.
    However.........This is not going to replenish or charge what you have just drained out by starting the engine/engines.
    The starter has the largest draw down on the batteries of all the electrical components on your boat. Each time you start the engine/engines....for 10 or less minutes, you have withdrawn more than you can put back in 10 minutes.
    It's like going to the bank and withdrawing more than you deposit......
    You have to run the engines for a long period of time to get back to charged conditions.
    You need to put a charger on them batteries.....You're causing more harm with the short starts and run for ten minutes.
    These guys are correct.....If your terminals are dirty, running the engines all day won't put anything back into the batteries especially the huge draw down you just made when you started the engine/engines.
    Pull both batteries and have them tested then fully charged....and stop running them for ten minutes.... the starter is sucking the life out of them.
    If you are worried about drain while they sit....disconnect one of the terminals.
    Hope you get her going....... "Ahi" is here and it's show time.
     
  14. jonesd055

    jonesd055 Newbie

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    Hawaii Kai
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    Jonesy
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    I got my replacement batteries (gel) from Costco - so far so good and they have the 1 year warranty like Jaeger said (get my vehicle batteries from there too). Anyone use those solar trickle chargers , are they any good, any recommendations on a particular model/brand??

    Aloha,
    Jonesy
     
  15. untensan

    untensan Newbie

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    Kealakekua
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    Terry
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    In my experience I've used the solar trickle charger and had the battery fluid boil out of the battery. They are not regulated so they will continue to charge a fully charged battery.

    Terry
     
  16. MANAPUA MAN

    MANAPUA MAN Newbie

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    HONOLULU HAWAII
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    CAPPY
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    You should install regulator on any trickle charge..... Regardless of type of charger...
    Especially if you are unable to be there to monitor......
     
  17. mrmahi

    mrmahi Newbie

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    mrmahi
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    One of the best components I installed on my boat was a Guest marine onboard battery charger/maintainer. It will extend your battery life, and is by far the most useful pieces of equipment I have on the boat. Just plug it it after each trip, no cables to hook up, made to withstand the marine environment, can be used on all battery types, etc etc. Just make sure the water (distilled, please) is topped off every few months if you have flooded lead acid batteries. Flooded batteries can discharge about 10% over a month without being connected to anything. The rate of discarge depends on the type of battery, temp and other variables. It is extremely harmful to let a battery sit unused in a partial state of discharge...especially flooded batteries.
    Amazon.com: Guest 2611A Charge Pro Series Marine Battery Charger (12/24-Volt, 10-Amps 5/5…
     
  18. JimmyK

    JimmyK Fisherman wannabe

    Location:
    Waipahu, Hawaii
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    JimmyK
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    17' Seaswirl Striper CC, Krystana C.
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    I use this: Ctek 7002. Will not over charge, reconditions batteries, and is very compact, easy to store.

    www.ctek.com.
     
  19. force21

    force21 Oldie

    Location:
    Kailua Hi USA
    Name:
    Glenn
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    21 Force JAYMIELYN
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    Batteries will drain standing over a period of time, most alternators (especially in outboards) are designed to supply the amperage needed to run the electronics of the motor (i.e., electronic fuel injection, ignition, power trim). You add additonal components like Depth finders, GPS, etc & now your consumption is higher. Even car alternators takes a long time to recover a batteries low state because it regulates the amount of amps needed to keep the vehicle running and "trickles" the left over amps to charge the battery. Also you may have a "draw" sapping the battery(s) down, try disconnecting the negative terminal when you are not using the boat & see if they maintain the voltage.
     
  20. beauchat

    beauchat Newbie

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    Russ
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    For reference my boat has a gas inboard. Guess i have to look into a charger.
     

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