Corrosion on brand new aluminum boat

Discussion in 'Boating Discussion' started by GhostHammer, Apr 14, 2015.

  1. GhostHammer

    GhostHammer Greenhorn

    Location:
    Renton
    Name:
    Jon
    Boat:
    Duckworth Pacific Navigator
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    Hey folks...

    I'm having an issue with corrosion and am looking for advice on what I should do. Here's the story... I bought a brand new 24' Duckworth Pacific Navigator. I put it in the water where I was planning on mooring it while I waited for the shop to have an opening so I could get it bottom painted. It took about 5 weeks from the time it went in the water, to the time I pulled it to go into the shop. Once it was in the shop, and the painter started prepping it, he noticed that it had a a good amount of corrosion and that he could still paint it, but could not warranty the work.

    Fast forward... The boat needs to be repaired, or worst case, replaced. Everybody who has seen the boat says that the level of corrosion that's taken place should never happen naturally. I've talked to Duckworth, and they are almost 100% confident that it's due to stray voltage in the marina. I have the marina doing a test around my slip to see what they find.

    Here's the question: Who is responsible?

    I've spoken to my insurance company (no claim filed yet). My agent says, officially, that corrosion isn't typically covered. However, since this is likely due to stray voltage, this is not "normal/natural" corrosion that comes with neglect. Certainly not normal given it's a brand new boat that's only been in the water for 5 weeks. Since it's likely a boat near my slip, or the marina itself, would the marina need to pay for any repairs? Then there's a bunch of secondary, related questions like... reimbursement for loss of use, paying for a slip I can't use etc.

    Anybody with advice or experience on what questions I should ask or how I should approach this would be greatly appreciated!

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  2. PCH

    PCH El Nino 2015!!!!!!

    Location:
    North San Diego
    Name:
    Paul
    Boat:
    Gregor 20
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    Damn dude that sucks. Did you do any wiring on your boat recently? Its either your having electrical issues (something is not grounded) or there is a stray current in your marina. To me it looks like electrolysis. What part of your boat is most effected? Do you have zincs on your boat and motor?
     
  3. Fishbones

    Fishbones Your wife thinks about ME

    Location:
    Chula Vista
    Name:
    Rich
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    One Off 28' Custom Built Skipjack (SOUTHWESTERN) & 18' Sylvan (Short Runs)
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    Make sure there are no ground wires connected to the hull
     
    Northeastfshman likes this.
  4. GhostHammer

    GhostHammer Greenhorn

    Location:
    Renton
    Name:
    Jon
    Boat:
    Duckworth Pacific Navigator
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    When I bought the boat, I had a couple downriggers, a chartplotter, VHF, radio and speakers installed. So, yes, I had some work done. While it hasn't been ruled out completely, I've been told it's unlikely that the boat is the source considering the degree of electrolysis going on. Most of the hull is ok, the parts most affected are the hull centerline and (I don't know how to better describe this) a metal strip that goes around the boat.
     
  5. PCH

    PCH El Nino 2015!!!!!!

    Location:
    North San Diego
    Name:
    Paul
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    Gregor 20
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    Have all the electronics inspected and like fishbones said, dont have anything grounded to the hull. Once that is ruled out, its got to be the marina. I think there is a tool you can use to detect stray currents in the water. Look into it. All that white shit on the aluminum from electrolysis.
     
  6. fishkilr

    fishkilr on the water

    Location:
    long beach,ca.u.s.a.
    Name:
    alby
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    Indian/Aahi/Inseine
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    Must have zincs or disaster in any harbor ...
     
    captainpound likes this.
  7. kj6883

    kj6883 Capt Kirk

    Location:
    Clovis Ca.
    Name:
    Kirk James
    Boat:
    Custom Davis pilothouse w/250 hp Honda ( OFF SITE 2 ), 16' power drifter, 25'Skipjack fisherman
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    Have seen this on a new boat several times. One of my customers left his new boat in a slip for the salmon opener for a month. And it looked like yours when he took it out. Made him sick, to say the least. You must have ZINKS and several of them. Many slips have stray current around them and not much you can do about that. On an aluminum boat the hole thing is conductive , with the motor mounted to the transom. The motor is grounded in the 12volt system. This makes the hole thing a big ground. The softest metal goes first, so make it ZINKS. Good Luck
     
    captainpound likes this.
  8. ALUMINATOR

    ALUMINATOR Well-Known "Member"

    Location:
    North San Diego County
    Name:
    Dennis
    Boat:
    27' self built
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    Jon,

    Sorry to hear this, you have a beautiful boat and I am sure you will be able to get her back into shape soon.

    Spend some time reading about aluminum boat's 12 volt electrical systems, zincs and stray current in all marinas. To start I would get this to test your boat: http://www.boatzincs.com/corrosion-reference-electrode-specs.html

    You can also use a test light to check your boat for wiring issues. Just touch one end to the pos side of the battery and the other to the hull and it will tell you if the hull is grounded to your 12 volt system. Not the best thing to have and it can be very difficult to isolate the entire system.

    Talk to other metal boat owners in the marina and ask them what they have done to protect their hulls. Stray current effects all marinas and even fiberglass boats have to deal with it. Many props, shafts and rudders have been lost to this silent killer. Be glad (if you can) that you found it now before more damage was done.

    In my opinion once a boat leave the manufacture it is your responsibility to be sure it is safe in the water. Please keep all of updated and PM me with any questions.
     
  9. Randy V

    Randy V Slamma Jamma

    Location:
    Insane Diego, CA
    Name:
    Randy
    Boat:
    30' Kona Star
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    Do you have a system of sacrificial zinc anodes installed on your boat?

    I'm guessing not?
     
  10. ShadBurke

    ShadBurke I've posted enough I should edit this section

    Location:
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    Name:
    Shad Burke
    Boat:
    22' Boston Whaler Guardians
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    Not to point fingers but make sure that the boat manufacturer didn't get a bad run of alloy for your build.

    It happens.... Just ask the Yamaha guys.....
     
    bajabills likes this.
  11. cvjarrod

    cvjarrod Freshie

    Location:
    Chula Vista
    Name:
    Jarrod
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    You just need something that will measure DC voltage difference to determine if electrolysis is taking place. Any cheap multimeter will work. Here's a link explaining how:

    http://www.aluminumalloyboats.com/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=3165

    Here's another link that outlines things to prevent galvanic and electrolytic corrosion on aluminum boats:

    http://www.boatingmag.com/boats/protecting-aluminum-boats-salt-water-corrosion

    Putting bottom paint on an aluminum boat will reduce galvanic and electrolytic corrosion by over 80%. Probably wasn't a good idea to put the boat in the slip before you got the bottom painted.
     
    Northeastfshman likes this.
  12. Bigeasy

    Bigeasy yeah, yeah!

    Location:
    Vallejo, CA
    Name:
    Eric W.
    Boat:
    Tunacious 238 Coastal Twin 150-E
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    Zincs! Is that the back of your boat, transom area? Yeah, that ground thing is one of the most important things to look out for! Sorry to hear about your boat, that sucker cost you a mint and this would've sent me over the edge!!!!!!
     
  13. GhostHammer

    GhostHammer Greenhorn

    Location:
    Renton
    Name:
    Jon
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    Duckworth Pacific Navigator
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    It's definitely electrolysis. The only question at this point is where is it coming from. I had it inspected and the boat is a total loss. Now to figure out how to get it replaced.
     
  14. cattledog1

    cattledog1 Member

    Location:
    San Diego
    Name:
    Chris
    Boat:
    Sportfisher C Major 7th
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    I would consider getting a paid independent expert to privately give you an opinion on what caused this. Sounds like you have a substantial loss on your hands. In terms of finding an expert, I would check into electrolysis monitoring systems. There are a few brands, one I remember is something like "Electro Guard"- see who your local dealers are and check with them for a recommendation on an expert. Just because someone is a "surveyor" doesn't mean they will know enough about corrosion issues.

    My boat has gauges that are supposed to indicate when any sort of active electrolysis issue is taking place. Seems to me that an alarm would actually be a better idea. Amazing that this damage occurred in only 5 weeks!

    I wonder if any of the other boats near your slip were damaged? Anything metal can fall prey to electrolysis, even bronze props etc.




    Chris
     
  15. bajabills

    bajabills I've posted enough I should edit this section

    Location:
    Ca
    Name:
    Bill
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    blackman fishmachine
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    Like shad said have the aluminum tested. Make sure it's the right alloy for hulls , as there are many.
     
  16. Sly McFly

    Sly McFly Newbie

    Name:
    Jim
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    Sly McFly
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    I'm sorry for your loss, but I am wondering if there is a bottom paint for aluminum boats that can help protect the hull from this?
     
  17. PCH

    PCH El Nino 2015!!!!!!

    Location:
    North San Diego
    Name:
    Paul
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    Gregor 20
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    Yes a epoxy barrier paint in best
     
  18. af dreamer

    af dreamer I've posted enough I should edit this section

    Location:
    long beach,ca
    Name:
    tom
    Boat:
    44 luhrs dreamer
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    I owned a Striker 37 ft alu boat for years.Had a monitor as well as zinks.NEVER had a issue.I ALWAYS used a tin based bottom paint.NEVER went with the epoxy barrior and a copper based paint.Also had a diver on it every month to monitor the hull and change zinks when needed.Tom
     

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